The advertising industry and 21st century brainwashing

Recently the Russian-based television station RT broadcast a programme about British nationalism, The Patriot Game presented by former MP George Galloway. Amid the usual leftist hysteria there were several minutes from an interview Galloway conducted with veteran racial nationalist Martin Webster.

Mr Webster stood up well to Galloway’s standard line of liberal outrage and moral blackmail, and among the issues he raised was the incessant and insidious propaganda campaign by advertisers to promote multiracialism.

By coincidence in the very same week, an article appeared in the London Review of Books, mainly focused on the over-hyped ‘scandal’ of online campaigning and data analysis by the UK firm Cambridge Analytica during Donald Trump’s 2016 presidential campaign. The relevant sentence from the article was as follows:

New digital advertising billboards at Piccadilly Circus are harvesting data (they contain cameras to analyse the facial expressions of people in the crowds passing by).

This form of intrusive surveillance has obvious commercial attractions, turning Piccadilly Circus into a gigantic ‘focus group’. But is it too paranoid to imagine political / propagandistic implications also?

For example, if advertising billboards were to contain such cameras, it would be possible to compile mountains of data aggregating the responses of the general public to particular depictions of multiracialism. This would reveal public attitudes far more accurately than an opinion poll (where many respondents will give polite or ‘politically correct’ responses on racial questions).

Such data collection would allow propagandists to calibrate their approach more carefully and precisely: to promote multiracialism (or other agendas) in the most effective manner, whether gradual or blatant, according to what proves effective among the covertly surveyed passers-by.

 

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