England Rugby drop ‘Saxons’ name in ethnic diversity drive

England’s rugby union team is the latest to fall into line with the worldwide disparagement of White identity.

This week the rugby authorities decided to rename the England reserve team, previously known as ‘England Saxons’. It will henceforth be known as ‘England A’, because the word ‘Saxon’ was thought to be an obstacle to the all-important drive to make rugby more ‘diverse’.

For some years now England Rugby have been trying to persuade crowds at international matches held at the Twickenham stadium in west London to stop singing their traditional anthem Swing Low, Sweet Chariot. Though there has never been any suggestion that this was intended to mock black heritage, the mere use of an originally black slave song is now seen as ‘cultural appropriation’.

While blacks are encouraged (indeed increasingly required) to be cast as White characters in historical plays, films and television productions, it is forbidden for Whites to stray onto black territory, as it is almost sacrilegious for a White to touch holy relics of black history and culture.

Examples from the world of sport include the renaming of the Washington Redskins as the Washington Football Team; and the suggested renaming of the Atlanta Braves and Cleveland Indians baseball teams. Another American football team – Kansas City Chiefs – have run into similar controversy and banned the use of native headdresses and face paint by fans.

Fans of Kansas City Chiefs are now banned from using once-traditional headdresses and faceprint

The term ‘diversity’ of course always means ‘less White’.

One never hears any suggestion that a Black-dominated sport or a Black-dominated form of popular culture should be made ‘more diverse’.

Perhaps in some cases that’s a good thing. If sectors such as ‘gangsta rap’ were to be made ‘more diverse’, then perhaps shootings and stabbings in London would also become ‘more diverse’, rather than featuring primarily blacks killing other blacks.

Saxons might now be unmentionable in England Rugby circles, but 24 hours after their name was purged, the real historic Anglo-Saxons had the last laugh.

The Cerne Abbas Giant

The famous 180 ft Cerne Abbas Giant, carved into a Dorset hillside, has after years of speculation been dated to the late Saxon period. Detailed sediment analysis, studying grains of sand and long-buried microscopic snails, revealed yesterday that the Giant was created somewhere between 700 and 1100 AD.

No one has yet suggested that he was created by Africans.

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