Stasi state targets British nationalists

Alex Davies of National Action, speaking at H&D’s 2014 John Tyndall Memorial Meeting in Preston

East Germany’s notorious Stasi – the political police – ceased to exist soon after the Berlin Wall came down in 1989 and the ‘German Democratic Republic’ disappeared into the dustbin of history.

Yet Stasi style policing is with us in Britain today, in the form of the ‘Terrorism Act’ that bans political groups, regardless of whether any ‘terrorist’ crimes have been committed or planned.

Last year Tory Home Secretary Amber Rudd banned the national-socialist youth group National Action. Former NA activist Jack Renshaw is in Preston prison on remand, awaiting charges for alleged membership of a ‘terrorist’ group; several serving British soldiers were arrested for alleged NA membership a few weeks ago in a still mysterious case; and this week several individuals seen as the former leaders of NA were similarly arrested, though not yet charged.

Now the ban has been extended to cover two alleged aliases for NA: Scottish Dawn and NS131. Under the Terrorism Act this latest action is unnecessary, as the law already forbids any attempt to restart a banned organisation under a new alias, but the new banning orders are probably a ‘belt and braces’ policy – a similar approach was taken in issuing extra bans for numerous aliases of the Islamist group Al-Muhajiroun.

The question remains whether this is the start of a wider crack down on the so-called ‘far right’, or whether it is a cosmetic exercise by the Home Office. Government experts must be well aware that a widespread crackdown on Islamism, including many banning orders and possible internment without trial, is likely – so it might seem politic to lock up a few White nationalists as well.

 

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