Spain maintains ‘blackface’ tradition despite PC ‘outrage’

Later this week a seasonal tradition will be maintained in Spain despite politically correct ‘outrage’.

This is the ‘Three Kings’ festival associated with the Christian Feast of Epiphany and the biblical story of the three Magi – often referred to as ‘kings’ or ‘wise men’ who travelled to visit the baby Jesus.

Across Spain colourful parades will be held, followed by feasting and the opening of presents.

At each of these parades, Spaniards will dress up as the Three Kings – Melchior, Caspar and Balthasar.

And the woke problem is that traditionally Balthasar has been represented as a negro, so those playing his part wear ‘blackface’, now regarded as ‘racist’.

This traditional identification of Balthasar as black dates back to one of the first English historians, the Northumbrian monk Bede who died in 735. Bede identified the Three Kings as representatives of the three sons of Noah – in other words the forefathers of the three racial groups that populated Europe, Asia and Africa.

‘Blackface’ traditions in the English Morris Dancing tradition have been under attack

H&D readers will quickly perceive how all of this creates problems in the politically correct 21st century!

The good news is that so far Spain has resisted pressure to abandon their traditions in the name of political correctness. If only our own English traditions had been so steadfastly defended.

Unfortunately, similar traditions in England have been abandoned in recent years. For example just last week the Silurian Border Morrismen changed their Boxing Day tradition and for the first time painted their faces green rather than black. This is just the latest example of an attack on English traditions, that has particularly targeted Morris men.

But to end on a positive note, as we are still celebrating the New Year holiday – head over to our new Instagram account to see a newly subtitled version of the great nationalist song Cara al Sol (‘Facing the Sun’) especially appropriate for this time of year as having bid farewell to the old year, we hail the new year in optimistic spirit.

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