Race police force resignation of FA Chairman

Greg Clarke, now ex-chairman of the Football Association

Greg Clarke, chairman of the Football Association, governing body in England for the world’s most popular sport, was forced to resign this week after using a forbidden racial word: not ‘n****r’ or ‘c**n’ or ‘w*g’ or ‘y*d’ – but merely ‘coloured’.

It didn’t help Mr Clarke that the context of this forbidden word was his testimony before a parliamentary committee, where he engaged in typical politically-correct grovelling. When discussing social media “abuse”, Clarke told the committee:

“…if I look at what has happened to high-profile female footballers, high-profile coloured footballers, and the abuse they have taken on social media. It is a free-for-all.

“People can see if you’re black and if they don’t like black people, because they’re filthy racists, they will abuse you anonymously online.

“They can see if you’re a woman, some of the high-profile black, female footballers take terrible abuse, absolutely vile abuse.”

Despite this typical White male self-abasement, the single word ‘coloured’ was picked out, and again despite a further abject apology, Clarke swiftly resigned.

Until about 1980, the word ‘coloured’ was perfectly normal in polite British discourse, but it’s now obligatory to say ‘black’ if one specifically means a negro, or use umbrella terms such as BAME if referring to non-Whites in general.

As with so much political correctness, this revision of vocabulary has come to Britain from the USA, where the term ‘coloured’ was part of the segregation of Whites and Coloureds that ended in the 1960s (although the word survives in its archaic meaning as part of the title of the anti-racist National Association for the Advancement of Coloured People (NAACP) founded in 1907).

‘Mixed race’ has followed ‘half-caste’ into the dustbin of forbidden terms (or perhaps as Mrs Clinton put it the “basket of deplorables”). This is because it’s no longer acceptable even to imply that there is such a thing as race, especially a putative ‘pure’ as opposed to ‘mixed’ race. Meanwhile the ‘N’ word is widely used at street level among ‘African-Americans’ and their co-racialists worldwide, but is among the worst sins imaginable if used by Whites. Other once-common words such as ‘piccaninny’, despite originating among blacks themselves, have long since been banned from White useage.

Many once common terms are now forbidden to Whites

This policing of language is a means of keeping Whites in line, constantly guarding their tongue and apologising for the imagined sins of their ancestors. Yet it’s becoming a dangerous game for the political establishment.

Organisations such as the FA are dependent on government cooperation, and grassroots football in particular depends on taxpayers’ largesse, so has no alternative but to play along with each successive politically correct obsession.

But the wider football-viewing public is increasingly exasperated. In the privacy of the polling booth, many once Labour-voting workers in northern England voted for Brexit (and in December 2019 for the Conservative Party) not solely because of constitutional issues and opposition to the European Union, but in a spirit of resistance to anti-White policies in the field of law and order, education, immigration and even sport.

The Greg Clarke ‘scandal’ proves the futility of attempting to appease ‘anti-racists’ by surrendering to their agenda. Ultimately it proves the futility of liberalism, ‘moderate’ conservatism and civic nationalism. Eventually Whites simply have to draw a line and say they will no longer accept this oppression. Will this resistance crystallise in post-Covid Britain?

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