Farage quits UKIP

UKIP leader Gerard Batten (left) with EDL founder Stephen Yaxley-Lennon (alias ‘Tommy Robinson’) whose increasingly close relationship with the party has now prompted Nigel Farage to resign.

Former UKIP leader Nigel Farage quit the party this week, after another row with the current chairman Gerard Batten. Farage was a founder member of UKIP, formed by homosexual libertarian Dr. Alan Sked in 1993. Before UKIP they had been in the Anti-Federalist League, and previously the Conservative Party, which they quit in 1992.

Farage was firmly against Batten’s plan’s to bring former BNP member and EDL founder Stephen Yaxley-Lennon (alias ‘Tommy Robinson’) into UKIP, and to focus more on being anti-Islam than anti-EU.

Former National Front official Martyn Heale (right) – a UKIP councillor from 2013 to 2017 – with Nigel Farage

However, when Farage was UKIP leader he let a number of former NF officials join the party without any problem – including Martyn Heale, the then UKIP chairman of the Thanet South constituency where Nigel Farage was the party’s candidate at the 2016 general election. Heale was a leading member of the National Front in London in the 1970s, and its Hammersmith branch organiser in 1978.

Subsequently Heale spent over twenty years in the Conservative Party, including three years as Chairman of Ramsgate Conservative Association, before joining UKIP about fourteen years ago. He was a UKIP county councillor for the Ramsgate division in Kent from 2013 to 2017. In August this year Heale applied to rejoin the Conservative Party, but his application was rejected as being liable to bring the party into disrepute, despite his earlier two decades as a Tory.

Nigel Farage has always denied claims that his father Guy Farage had himself been a member of the NF in the 1970s.

Martyn Heale as a London NF activist

Rather more serious than this row over alleged ‘extremism’ is UKIP’s continuing identity crisis. The party will surely struggle now to fight a serious campaign, if Theresa May’s Brexit troubles lead to a general election next year. Realistically there isn’t much time for Farage and his financial backer Arron Banks to start a new party, and none of the splinter groups that broke away from UKIP during the past year or two, such as the For Britain Movement or Democrats & Veterans, have really built up momentum.

Are we heading back to a period of two-party politics? And if so, will this be an interlude before the emergence of a radical anti-immigration party?

‘Golliwog’ row MEP quits UKIP

Bill Etheridge, seen as leader of UKIP’s libertarian faction, with ex-partner Lorraine Chew

The latest leading figure to quit UKIP is West Midlands MEP and former leadership candidate Bill Etheridge. This follows last week’s resignation of the Earl of Dartmouth, MEP for SW England.

Mr Etheridge is perhaps best known for the incident in 2011 when he and his then wife Star Etheridge (who were both Conservative council candidates) were forced to quit the Tories after they posted images of golliwogs (seen as a ‘racist’ symbol) on Facebook.

A remarkable number of UKIP’s MEPs have quit since the party’s finest hour in 2014 when it elected 24 members to the Brussels / Strasbourg parliament.

Roger Helmer (East Midlands) quit the Parliament entirely in July 2017, but the rest of the defectors have continued to sit as independents or for other parties. Janice Atkinson (SE England) was expelled in March 2015; former leadership candidate Steven Woolfe (NW England) left UKIP in October 2016 and has recently applied to join the Tories; former leader Diane James (SE England) left in November 2016; Jim Carver (West Midlands) walked away from UKIP in May 2018.

And within the last ten days Dartmouth and Etheridge have been the latest departures.

Bill Etheridge was forced to quit the Tories in 2011 after he and his then wife posted golliwog pictures on Facebook.

Bill Etheridge has long been seen as leader of the ‘libertarian’ faction in UKIP, which until recently was seen as especially strong among the party’s younger members. These are people whose main interest in politics is what they see as extending the Thatcher revolution – shrinking the state, cutting taxes and reducing the ‘burden’ of regulation on business.

The likes of Etheridge are far less concerned about issues such as immigration.

In his resignation letter to UKIP chairman Gerard Batten, Etheridge wrote:

“The changes you have made since becoming leader have changed the party beyond all recognition.

“You have allowed your personal obsessions free rein. The party is now seen by large swathes of the British public as a vehicle for hate towards Muslims and the gay community.

“While there is a place for extreme nationalist and reactionary views in politics and I defend the right of you and others to hold and express your opinions, I do not believe these were the opinions and policies that Ukip MEPs were elected to represent.”

UKIP leaders past and present clash over whether party should accept EDL founder ‘Robinson’

Former UKIP leader Nigel Farage has clashed bitterly with present leader Gerard Batten over whether the party should allow EDL founder Stephen Yaxley-Lennon – aka ‘Tommy Robinson’ – to become a member. Anyone who has been in the EDL, or certain other proscribed ‘extremist’ groups such as the National Front or British National Party, is banned by UKIP’s constitution from joining the party.

Batten and some of UKIP’s Islam-obsessed faction – notably Lord Pearson of Rannoch – were keen to recruit ‘Robinson’, but Farage and his allies are concerned by the EDL founder’s criminal record and yobbish style.

Caroline Jones – former UKIP leader in the Welsh Assembly – has already quit the party and returned to the Conservatives because of Batten’s anti-Islam stance, but UKIP has managed to win back some former officials who had defected to Anne Marie Waters’ For Britain Movement – including her former deputy Jeff Wyatt.

Former BNP council candidate Robert Baggs at the For Britain Movement’s conference in Liverpool last weekend with (left) half-Pakistani anti-Muslim activist Shazia Hobbs and (right) controversial journalist Katie Hopkins.

While losing some of her original supporters, Ms Waters has won over several ex-BNP activists including former council candidate Robert Baggs, election guru Eddy Butler, 2004 London Mayoral candidate Julian Leppert, former Tower Hamlets organiser Jeff Marshall, and former West Midlands regional organiser Keith Axon.

Last Saturday Farage upstaged his old party by speaking at a rally in Bolton alongside former Brexit minister David Davis and Labour MP Kate Hoey, launching a cross-party effort to prevent ‘betrayal of Brexit’. Farage will speak at a series of further rallies for the ‘Leave Means Leave’ campaign across the country. Joining him on these platforms will be a range of speakers including Tory MP Jacob Rees-Mogg and Tim Martin, owner of the Wetherspoons chain of pubs.

 

‘Antifascist’ confusion over bookshop attack – UKIP suspends three activists

Times of Israel columnist Sharon Klaff (second left) handing in a pro-Zionist petition at Downing St. On Saturday Ms Klaff was accused of being part of a gang attacking a Central London bookshop.

Britain’s largest leftwing bookshop was attacked by a dozen Zionist thugs on Saturday evening, leading the United Kingdom Independence Party to suspend three prominent activists allegedly involved.

Bookmarks (on Bloomsbury St in central London) is linked to the Socialist Workers Party (SWP), Britain’s largest Trotskyist organisation. While several ‘socialist’ bookshops have also acted as headquarters for violent groups associated with IRA terrorism and ‘antifascist’ gangsterism, there is no such particular connection with Bookmarks. Unlike (for example) Red Action or AFA, the SWP and its various front organisations couldn’t fight their way out of a paper bag.

The shop was therefore a soft target for the fake patriots of ‘Make Britain Great Again’, led by a Thatcherite Tory called Luke Nash-Jones, who was once President of the Conservative Association at Birkbeck College, London, but is now in UKIP.

MBGA is on the intellectually-challenged, ultra-Zionist wing of the ‘Alt Right’ – obsessed with Islam and natural cheerleaders for Donald Trump and EDL founder ‘Tommy Robinson’.

On Saturday evening a dozen MBGA activists made their way to Bloomsbury after a demonstration in support of online conspiracy theorist Alex Jones whose pages have recently been deleted by Facebook and other platforms following the usual ‘hate speech’ circus. For some reason Nash-Jones and his gang thought that throwing their weight around in a bookshop would help the ‘anti-censorship’ case. Even more bizarrely, they thought it was a good idea to post video of the attack on their own YouTube channel. (This was soon taken down when someone belatedly engaged their brain, but by then it had been copied by MBGA’s leftwing opponents.)

UKIP executive member Elizabeth Jones (seen above right with Donald Trump’s lawyer Rudy Giuliani) was suspended after an attack on Central London shop Bookmarks last Saturday.

Easily identified among the gang outside the bookshop was a member of UKIP’s national executive Elizabeth Jones, who was a candidate for the party leadership in 2016. Ms Jones stood for UKIP in Bermondsey & Old Southwark at last year’s general election, but today was suspended from the party alongside Nash-Jones and a third UKIP activist Martin Costello, who was parliamentary candidate for South Swindon last year. Mr Costello has also served as a special police constable in Wiltshire.

Ms Jones claimed only to have been outside the shop not part of the attack. Also identified by numerous ‘antifascists’ was South African born Zionist Sharon Klaff, who has a regular column on the Times of Israel website.

Had real British nationalists attacked leftwing premises in this way, there would have been ‘anti-terrorist’ police raids across the country within 24 hours. Not to mention had any of us dared to enter a Jewish bookshop and engage in such thuggery. London Forum organiser Jez Turner is presently serving a prison sentence for an entirely peaceful speech in Whitehall: what sentence would he have got for attacking a bookshop?

Sadly the price for Saturday’s attack is likely to be paid by sensible, peaceful British nationalists whose meetings will be attacked in ‘reprisals’: not from the women and pensioners whom Nash-Jones likes to confront, but by the militant ‘antifa’ squads who ironically were expelled from the SWP decades ago.

UPDATE: Sharon Klaff now denies that she was present during the bookshop attack, but the ‘antifascist’ website Hope not Hate claims she was there: whom should one believe given such an unpalatable choice?

UPDATE 2: Hope not Hate has now withdrawn its allegation against Sharon Klaff – smears, denials and counter-smears continue to circulate among embarrassed ‘antifascists’ and Zionists!

Sarah Archibald of Hope not Hate fingers Klaff for bookshop attack

 

Dog eat dog: Klaff threatens ‘antifascists’ with defamation action

 

Sharon Klaff, allegedly part of the Nash-Jones gang on Saturday, seen here (second right) with fellow ultra-Zionists Paul Besser (a Britain First activist); Ambrosine Shitrit; Gemma Sheridan and Jonathan Hoffman.

 

Lewisham East parliamentary by-election: the end of civic nationalism?

David Kurten, former UKIP leadership candidate humiliated in Lewisham by-election

Yesterday’s parliamentary by-election in the SE London constituency of Lewisham East was another tragi-comic episode in the slow death of the United Kingdom Independence Party.

Under the leadership of Nigel Farage, UKIP won more votes and seats than any other party at the 2014 European Parliamentary elections, ending up with 24 MEPs, though never gaining more than two MPs in the House of Commons. The party was primarily responsible for forcing then Conservative Prime Minister David Cameron to concede a referendum on Britain’s membership of the European Union, resulting in the historic Brexit vote of 2016.

But that was the beginning of the end for UKIP. Structural problems and ideological confusion (already analysed in several issues of H&D well before 2016) were never properly addressed even under Farage’s leadership, and since his departure immediately after the referendum the party has been scarred by factional infighting and incompetent leadership.

Yesterday was merely the latest demonstration of UKIP’s desperate state. Their by-election candidate was one of their highest profile and most experienced performers, half-caste London Assembly member David Kurten, but he finished a poor sixth with only 380 votes (1.7%), behind not only the big three parties and the Greens, but also behind the Women’s Equality Party!

Tess Culnane – polled more votes in a single Lewisham ward than UKIP managed yesterday across the entire seven-ward constituency of Lewisham East

To put this into context, H&D readers should remember that in 2002 BNP local election candidates Barry Roberts and Tess Culnane polled more votes in a single ward of Lewisham East than Mr Kurten managed yesterday across the entire constituency (which contains seven wards)!

The only good news for UKIP is that Kurten finished ahead of his former colleague Anne Marie Waters. She had been UKIP candidate for this constituency at the 2015 General Election, polling a very creditable 3,886 votes (9.1%) in what were admittedly far better times nationwide for the party. After an acrimonious leadership election last year, Ms Waters quit and with the help of former BNP and EDL activists created a breakaway party called the For Britain Movement.

Yesterday Ms Waters finished a poor seventh, with only 266 votes (1.2%). Her only excuse is that Labour called the by-election very quickly after the resignation of the previous MP, so Ms Waters and her campaign team (which included former East London BNP election guru Eddy Butler) had very little time. Yet it must be admitted that the Liberal Democrats also had very little time, yet they succeeded in building a serious bandwagon and advancing to second place: having lost their deposit twelve months ago with only 4.4%, the Lib Dems polled 24.6% yesterday.

Anne Marie Waters on the by-election campaign trail with former BNP election guru Eddy Butler (third left, back row) and an activist team including several former BNP officials and councillors, whose help could not save Ms Waters from a crushing defeat.

The inescapable conclusion is that the Lib Dem message (almost entirely focused on pro-Remain voters) resonated strongly with a certain section of the Lewisham electorate. We know that there is a different section of the Lewisham electorate who respond to nationalist issues, including immigration and law and order, but the Islam-obsessed campaigns of Kurten and Waters failed to resonate similarly among those voters. This was despite Ms Waters’ ally ‘Tommy Robinson’, founder of the EDL, getting himself jailed during the campaign and creating worldwide publicity. Proof yet again that there is a big difference between Facebook likes, or turning out screaming mobs in Whitehall, and the serious grown-up politics of winning votes.

It probably didn’t help that Lewisham is an odd place to bang on about Muslims: the area has many immigration-related problems, but relatively few of the large non-White population here are Muslims.

The third civic nationalist candidate, Massimo DiMambro of the new Democrats & Veterans party, was always going to be overshadowed by the far higher profile and better financed campaigns of Kurten and Walters: he managed only 67 votes (0.3%).

However the Democrats & Veterans party, which is much less Islam-obsessed than either UKIP or For Britain, but takes a strong line on immigration and other nationalist issues, seems to be having more success than Ms Waters’ party in building a network of branches nationwide.

The best bet is that UKIP-style civic nationalism is dying, but when the dust settles Democrats & Veterans might be the one viable civic nationalist party still capable of making a challenge (at least for local council seats).

 

H&D 84 published

 The new issue (#84) of Heritage and Destiny magazine is now out.

The 26 page, May – June 2018 issue, has as its lead.

The Last UKIP Winners? Derby UKIP ousts Asian Labour leader in “Racist” campaign, while the rest of their party fades away.

front cover issue 84

Heritage and Destiny Issue 84

Issue 84 -May – June 2018.

Contents include:

  • Editorial – by Mark Cotterill
  • Madness by Media – Simon Sheppard details the relentless march of the cat ladies
  • Book Review: The Colonisation of Europe – by Guillaume Faye – Part I – reviewed by Ian Freeman
  • Dialects in danger – Edmund Morrison looks into the Yorkshire dialect
  • Britain’s Secret Files on Nationalist Leader Colin Jordan – Part III – by Peter Rushton
  • Book Review: If we do nothing Essays and Reviews from 25 years of White Advocacy – by Jared Taylor – reviewed by James Knight.
  • Local Elections 2018, UKIP disappearance leaves nationalist vacuum – Peter Rushton looks at this years’ local election results
  • Movie Review: Darkest Hour – the new Churchill movie reviewed by Mark Webber
  • Zionist thought police target “anti-Semitic” Left – by Peter Rushton
  • Two pages of readers’ letters
  • Movement News – Latest analysis of the nationalist movement – by Peter Rushton

If you would like 2 sample copies please send £5.00 /$10.00 or for a years (6 issues) subscription, send £26.00 (UK) – $48.00 (USA) – £35.00/$48.00 (Rest of world).

Dying UKIP ousts leader

Henry Bolton (left) – ousted UKIP leader – with the party’s only successful chief Nigel Farage

[spacer height=”20px”]On Thursday UKIP lost yet another council seat, today the dying party voted to oust its leader Henry Bolton, who has been brought down by multiple scandals. The vote at an emergency UKIP conference this afternoon went 867-500 against Bolton.

UKIP’s real problem is a combination of poor quality officials and a confused identity.  To what extent is it a nationalist party?  Is it at all racially conscious?  Does it even oppose immigration?  Is it Thatcherite (even ultra-Thatcherite or US-style libertarian) or does it seek to capture some of the spirit and electoral base of the old Labour Party?

None of these questions will be resolved today by the vote to remove Henry Bolton.  In fact Bolton himself may refuse to go quietly, but he is now so discredited that it seems impossible for Nigel Farage and Arron Banks to use him in their longstanding plan to overturn UKIP’s constitution.

Farage and Banks had aimed to reduce the power of UKIP’s National Executive and concentrate power in the leader’s office – what some have unkindly called a BNP-style, führer-principle constitution (though of course without BNP policies)!

David Kurten, likely to be UKIP’s next leader

[spacer height=”20px”]Now the most likely outcome is for UKIP’s rump to select either half-caste London Assembly member David Kurten, or half-Turkish MEP Tim Aker, as the next (perhaps last?) captain of the sinking ship.  Meanwhile Farage and Banks will go off to form a new pressure group (probably not a party) in favour of “Hard Brexit”, while Anne-Marie Waters will continue her chaotic attempt to forge a new party out of UKIP dissidents and ex-EDL types.

Many disillusioned UKIP members have already voted with their feet and wallets, rejoining the Conservative Party where they hope to elect Jacob Rees-Mogg as the next Tory leader, succeeding hopeless Prime Minister Theresa May.  Yet despite his new status as bookies’ favourite, Rees-Mogg is unlikely to make it as far as the members’ ballot, and will probably strike a deal with Boris Johnson or Michael Gove.

Will all this eventually leave political space for revival of a serious racial nationalist party?

UKIP’s death spiral – councillors in mass resignation

Latest UKIP MEP to quit is Tim Aker (above right), seen here campaigning with Nigel Farage in Thurrock, where the entire UKIP group has walked out.

The latest twist in the slow death of UKIP has seen mass resignations in two of the party’s few remaining strongholds. Two MEPs have left the party in the past week, which has led to entire blocs of councillors also quitting.

All seventeen UKIP councillors in the Essex borough of Thurrock (who had been the main opposition to the Tories on the council) resigned yesterday, including Eastern England MEP and former Thurrock parliamentary candidate Tim Aker. They have formed a new group called ‘Thurrock Independents’.

Meanwhile five of the six UKIP councillors in Hartlepool, which had been the party’s only growth area in the 18 months since the Brexit referendum, have also walked out, joined by the MEP for NE England and former UKIP leadership candidate Jonathan Arnott.

Significantly UKIP’s latest leadership crisis – with Henry Bolton refusing to quit despite a no confidence vote by his entire party executive – does not seem to have boosted the breakaway party set up by Anne-Marie Waters, the Islam obsessed runner-up to Bolton in last year’s leadership contest. After their first application was rejected by the Electoral Commission, this new outfit is still not registered as a political party: it now hopes to use the name ‘For Britain Movement’.

Henry Bolton (above left) – the latest catastrophic UKIP leader – with Nigel Farage

Rather than Waters and her ex-EDL associate ‘Tommy Robinson’, the short-term beneficiaries of UKIP’s collapse might be Nigel Farage and his financial backer Arron Banks, though they are likely to build a cross-party movement out of UKIP’s ruins rather than a new party, and it would be focused merely on securing Brexit.

The tragedy is that the broadly nationalist views held by a very large percentage of British voters now have no credible electoral voice. Both UKIP and the BNP have effectively died, and for the time being the only widely-heard spokesmen for any sort of nationalist or even vaguely patriotic politics are cranks or charlatans.

 

Pro-Farage candidate wins UKIP leadership

Henry Bolton (left) – winner of the UKIP leadership race – with Nigel Farage

[spacer height=”10px”]Despite all the hype, UKIP’s small-c conservative membership eventually voted for the most obviously “respectable” leadership candidate.

Former intelligence officer Henry Bolton was today elected UKIP leader with 3,874 votes (29.9%), ahead of the anti-Islam campaigner Anne Marie Waters on 2,755 (21.3%). The party’s peculiar first-past-the-post, single ballot system – and the fact that there were seven candidates on the ballot paper, six of whom had a serious chance – meant it was always likely that the winner would have less than one third of the membership’s support.

Turnout was only 46.6%, reflecting the fact that many of those nominally listed as party members (and entitled to vote) have already quit UKIP and had no interest in its leadership contest.

Bolton had warned that a victory for Waters and her EDL backers would risk UKIP becoming some form of “nazi party”. He will now claim a clear mandate, since the two most obvious anti-Islam candidates (Ms Waters and GLA member Peter Whittle) had only 32.2% between them, so even with a transferable vote Ms Waters would not have won.

Mixed-race GLA member David Kurten finished third with 2,201 votes (17.0%); Welsh businessman and libertarian John Rees-Evans fourth on 2,021 (15.6%); original bookies’ favourite Peter Whittle fifth on 1,413 (10.9%), after much of his support drained to Ms Waters; Rotherham parliamentary candidate Jane Collins a surprisingly poor sixth on 566 (4.4%) despite having been backed by two former rival candidates who withdrew in her favour; and space-travel enthusiast Aidan Powlesland seventh on 85 (0.65%).

All eyes now are on Nigel Farage and his financial backer Arron Banks, who had plans to launch a new breakaway movement within days if Waters or Whittle were elected. Their decision may now depend on whether Henry Bolton is able to secure constitutional changes reducing the role of the party’s executive and enhancing the leadership’s power.[spacer height=”20px”]

UKIP leadership candidate Anne Marie Waters (left) promoting the UK launch of anti-Islam group PEGIDA alongside the EDL founder Tommy Robinson (centre) and Liberty GB’s Paul Weston

[spacer height=”20px”]The most likely short-term breakaway is now from the other side of the party: Anne Marie Waters and her Islam-obsessed faction.

One of Ms Waters’s leading allies, Paul Weston of Liberty GB, reacted badly to the result, tweeting: “UKIP needed a revolutionary leader, instead it got Mr Establishment Henry Bolton OBE who will do nothing whatsoever about Islam.”

Another close Waters associate, EDL founder Stephen Yaxley-Lennon (alias Tommy Robinson), similarly commented: “UKIP are now irrelevant when it comes to the biggest threat our country faces. We need a political voice to oppose Islam like Wilders & Le Pen.”

By contrast third-placed David Kurten and fellow candidate Jane Collins were quick to tweet their loyalty to the new leader.

H&D will have a fuller report on the UKIP contest later this weekend, and a detailed analysis in issue 81 of what these developments mean for the British nationalist movement.

Anne Marie Waters now favourite to win UKIP leadership

UKIP leadership candidate Anne Marie Waters (left) promoting the UK launch of anti-Islam group PEGIDA alongside the EDL founder Tommy Robinson (centre) and Liberty GB’s Paul Weston

Anti-Islam campaigner Anne Marie Waters is now favourite to win the UKIP leadership. The result will be announced at the party’s conference in Torquay on 29th September.

Ms Waters is an associate of EDL founder Stephen Yaxley-Lennon (alias ‘Tommy Robinson’), and one of her campaign organisers is ex-BNP official Jack Buckby. Most of the UKIP establishment, including almost all of its MEPs, are set to quit if she wins the leadership, but ordinary members seem more receptive to her obsessional focus on Islam.

Despite Jack Buckby’s involvement in her campaign, Ms Waters has indicated that she would not allow former BNP or NF members to join UKIP (maintaining the present constitutional ban on such applicants).  However a Waters-led UKIP would almost certainly attract a flood of applications from supporters of the EDL and other anti-Islamist groups such as Pegida and Liberty GB.

For almost the entire campaign (since the resignation of Paul Nuttall just after the general election) GLA member Peter Whittle had been favourite to win UKIP’s leadership election, but heavy bets have been placed on Ms Waters in the last few days, making her the new favourite with bookmakers including Ladbrokes, Bet Fred, Coral and Betfair.

Dark horse UKIP leadership candidate Henry Bolton has extensive experience as a military intelligence officer and counter-terrorism expert

Rival candidate Henry Bolton (favoured by much of the UKIP establishment) seems to have overplayed his hand by warning last week that UKIP “could see a swing away from our traditional, secular values and stances; towards something far darker… we could easily slip towards the ideals of National Socialism. The last thing UKIP needs is to become the UK Nazi Party.”

UKIP members seems to have viewed this intervention (quite rightly) as ludicrous hype.  Anne Marie Waters is an Islam-obsessed crank, but she isn’t a “Nazi”!

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