Summer camps in Italy and England as nationalists adapt to Covid restrictions

Despite the so called “Pandemic” restrictions, the new Italian nationalist movement of La Rete (“The Network”) had decided to hold a summer camp for approximately 200 leaders and active militants on July 4th-5th in a location called “House of Patriots” in Solarolo, near Ravenna. The camp was called Campo Zero to underline that it was a new beginning in the nationalist struggle. Several ideological, cultural and organizational conferences were held in order to explain the tactical and strategic objectives of the movement as well as the particular functions of the different Commissions and Offices. Among the Commissions are the Legal Office (that is already quite busy against Facebook) and satellite associations like Praesidium (cultural front) and Rete Studentesca (Youth Front). There will also be a new sports association launched. Special instructions regarding propaganda and use of social networks were given to the activists by experts who explained that the situation is continually changing and therefore it is important to understand the change and adapt our tactics accordingly.

Father Giulio Tam, probably the most famous Italian traditionalist priest, celebrated the Mass (in Latin) on Sunday and exhorted the militants to be ready to fight like the warriors in the battles of Lepanto, Vienna and the Spanish Reconquista.

Several guests representing other right wing political, cultural, and assistance groups were present. Agreements were reached regarding coordinated militant actions, assistance for political activists arrested under false accusations as well as cultural activities. This is the first step to achieve real cooperation and build a common front for nationalists.

The leadership of the Rete made several important decisions: the recruiting and membership campaign was officially launched, five new official spokesmen have been nominated for different areas of the country, the Movement will participate in the political campaign against the new “homophobia” law (which is in fact in contrast with freedom of speech and opinion) and in other political battles and the Associazione Evita Peron is organizing the Colonia Evita Peron, the summer camp for children (again in the House of Patriots).

Several discussions about particular aspects of the struggle were held by selected groups of militants, regional leaders reported about the political situation in their areas and women seemed to be particularly helpful and active.

Campo Zero, however, was not just speeches and meetings. The local activists provided an excellent organization, good food, and security at the entrance. The comrades had the opportunity to purchase books, Soldato Politico t-shirts, etc. and last but not least, after the lockdown, to enjoy the joyful atmosphere, especially during the meals and on Saturday night, during the music concert with the FVM band.

Over the same weekend in Derbyshire, England, Mark Collett and Laura Towler’s Patriotic Alternative held their own camp, which was well attended, by mainly younger nationalists. They also climbed the famous local hill known as Mam Tor, where they displayed a giant banner proclaiming ‘White Lives Matter’!

Mark is still trying to register Patriotic Alternative as a political party with the Electoral Commission, after his first two applications were rejected. This registration process is essential before PA can contest elections, though of course for the time being there are no elections in any case due to the Covid-19 pandemic.

Laura Towler and Mark Collett of Patriotic Alternative

In common with other British nationalist parties and groups, PA is having to adapt temporarily to a world where not only are there no elections, but also indoor conferences and meetings are banned (if they have more than thirty people and/or if there are platform speakers).

This makes other forms of propaganda all the more important.

New nationalist party – La Rete (The Network) – formed in Italy

Roberto Fiore (above left) has been a close ally of Nick Griffin since the early 1980s. A few weeks ago Fiore was abandoned by most of his former followers in the Italian nationalist party Forza Nuova.

As of early May of this year a major split has occurred in Forza Nuova, a Nationalist Party in Italy which was founded and led by Roberto Fiore. For a period of time now it has been felt that the leadership in Rome has strayed from the beliefs the Party was founded on. Due to political differences it is believed that 75% of current membership have left along with two of the three Vice-Secretaries. Supporting groups such as Solidarietà Nazionale, Associazione Evita Peron, and Lega Della Terra have also joined in the exodus. The choice was not an easy one as many members have been involved from the beginning. They all have weathered the battles together and have held the torch of Nationalism through the years.

Out of this the membership has decided not to end the battle for freedom and continue to fight for the preservation of the culture and future of Italy. It has formed and given birth to the Rete Delle Comunita Forzanoviste. This is a temporary or rather interim organization being utilized to bring Nationalists throughout Italy together in a common cause. A new Party will be formed in the Autumn of this year. Already there have been discussions with new groups joining along as well as old members returning. There is a feeling of great enthusiasm and hope that the Rete (Network) will forge ahead and provide solutions for today’s problems in Italy and Europe as a whole.

Municipal councillor Antonio Fasano has led the entire Campania regional branch of Forza Nuova into the new organisation La Rete.

What is the Rete?

The Rete is a network of militant communities active all over Italy. These communities have decided to form a new nationalist movement with a common organization and style of action. The old nationalist associations seem to be outdated and unable to solve new problems. On the other end, the social situation is changing dramatically in our Country. The majority of people’s anger with the globalists has increased in number but they are ideologically confused. They understand – or better yet – feel the system is totally wrong but they have no idea of how to change it, let alone what to build upon its ashes. This means that the Rete will have to find new methods and elaborate a modern strategy, at the cultural level as well as in the streets. The Rete will work for the birth of a Nationalist Bloc together with other patriotic groups.

When did it start, and what are its goals?

It started on May 8th, a day dedicated to St. Michael the Archangel, chosen as the protector of all militant patriots. The Rete is formed by hundreds of activists with good discipline and experience. The first step was to give the Rete a solid organization: a centralized leadership – the Segreteria Nazionale – consisting of a team of both young and old people. It will also incorporate a number of political “commissions” to analyze specific aspects of the struggle (students, foreign policy, ideology, etc) and technical “offices” with specific tasks (graphic, legal, media, social and recruiting).

Salvatore Ferrara, head of Forza Nuova in the Lombardy region, is one of several leading figures in the party who have left to form La Rete.

The Rete has several so called “satellites” or parallel organizations. Solidarietà Nazionale is active in collecting food and helping poor Italians with food distributions (in contrast with the privileges accorded to immigrants). The Evita Peron Association is the women’s front, active against gender propaganda, it also takes care of a Summer camp for children and might soon start homeschooling, (quite uncommon in Italy, so far). The Lega Della Terra is for the peasants and farmers, and our young activists are forming a Rete Studentesca in the schools. We plan to form specific social cells in different categories, such as truck drivers, teachers, etc.

Our militants are also busy with operation “Quartieri Sicuri” (Safe Neighborhoods) walking the streets in dangerous urban areas. The Rete has just opened a website http://www.la-rete.it/ but we are going to open more, for the satellite organizations and for cultural articles.

What are the “8 Points” and what type of society do they aim to create?

The “8 Points” have contributed to form a whole generation of militants in Italy. Synthetically, they are 1) Prolife, 2) Pro natural family, 3) Stop immigration, start repatriation, 4) Ban freemasonry and other similar sects, 5) Ban usury, print only “people’s money”, 6) Restore the 1929 State/Church agreement, 7) Cancel all anti-patriotic laws, 8) Create workers’ corporations to protect the people from the globalists. The Rete has produced a Political Manifesto that derives directly from these principles and applies them to the new social situation regarding the State, the concept of National Identity and Italian/European Fatherland, the need for a Demographic growth, the Economy, the Judicial system, Education, and the Military. The Political Manifesto has been conceived as dynamic as every part can be developed into a larger specific political document and we welcome contributions from experts in the specific fields, inside or outside the Rete. We believe that experts and intellectuals should not confine themselves to pure theory, they must produce cultural weapons and ammunition for the political soldiers working in the streets.

The Evita Peron Association, which promotes traditional family values and organises nationalist family events, has broken away from the Forza Nuova structure and is now aligned with La Rete.

As for the society we want to build, it is a society based on natural law. You can call it a “New Order” as it will be totally different from the present, corrupt system but you can also call it an “Ancient Order” based on the values and teachings of our European forefathers, so probably the right definition is “Eternal Order” because the values of God, Fatherland and Family are always the pillars of our civilization. In our era the globalist agenda is threatening our national identity in every aspect of life: cultural, political, religious, ethnic, economic, etc. It is a totalitarian threat and therefore the defence must also be totalitarian. We cannot afford to underestimate even just one of the tentacles of the globalist monster.

How did you get involved, and what is your role?

I have been involved in militant activities all my life, just like my father before and my sons today … At the moment, I am a member of the Segreteria Nazionale and of the commission for developing the Political Manifesto. I am also active in building a cultural front for the Rete. In October the roles will be better defined in a Congress but on the whole, we wish to work as a team and hope to see as many new young leaders as possible at all levels of the Movement.

Milan student leader Alessio Toniolo is another prominent activist who has left Roberto Fiore’s Forza Nuova to join La Rete.

What will it do in the USA?

The branch in the USA will act as a support group for the Party in Italy. We will attempt to attract members here who have a love of either their Italian or European background. The hope will be by attracting attention to the Party we can help with the needed causes in Italy. Some of the planned activities are to spread awareness for the Party, write articles, and develop podcasts discussing issues in Italy as well as throughout Europe in the hope of awakening a nationalist spirit. We will reach out to Nationalist website and podcast hosts in an effort to help us promote and spread our message. In return we offer full solidarity and hope to reciprocate any needed help. We also wish to develop a network with other Nationalists here in the United States and to work together wherever possible. Our goal is similar to any other true nationalist group which is to preserve the culture and land of our family and forefathers.

What do you hope to achieve in Italy?

First of all, we have to contact other patriots and explain our strategy. Many of them have formed small local groups or do not belong to any association at all, however, by joining the Rete they can give a valid contribution to the cause. Local activities have already started but as soon as the “virus laws” relax, the Rete will organize bigger events. On September 29th (Saint Michael’s Day) all sections will renew the traditional “Solemn Promise” to St Michael the Archangel and in October the Rete will hold a National Congress. Strategically, we hope to show our people the way towards a nationalist reaction against globalism.

How do we contact you?

Party HQ – Italy – Piazza Aspromonte 31, Milano, 20131, Italy

Website – www.la-rete.it

US address – La Rete; 1435 86th Street, Brooklyn, NY 11228

English speakers interested in more information or how they may help please email Retecomunitafn@gmail.com

Many thanks to our Italian-American correspondent Frank Dotro, who reports from New Jersey.

Surge of support for Italian anti-immigration parties

The results of two regional elections in Italy show strong support for the parties of the populist and nationalist right, though the left clung on to power in Emilia Romagna, while losing calamitously badly in Calabria.

Lega strongman Matteo Salvini (affectionately known as “il Capitano”) had a mountain to climb in Emilia Romagna, which, despite being one of Italy’s wealthiest regions, has consistently returned left wing regional governments since 1945. Indeed, its principal city, “Red Bologna” (a pun on the famous red bricks of which it is built, combined with its preference for left wing parties) was notoriously anti-fascist even in the years of Mussolini’s rule, when opposing fascism took much more courage than it does to-day.

Il Capitano’s task was not made any easier by the choice of Signora Lucia Borgonzoni to lead the right-wing coalition. She is relatively unknown, whereas the centre-left’s candidate, Stefano Bonaccini, was the outgoing regional president who had, by common consent even of his political opponents, led a highly competent administration for many years.

Italy’s complicated version of proportional representation means that different parties find it helpful to group together in combined lists, while maintaining their separate identities by a process of allocation of seats within the list according to the percentage taken by each constituent party.

For each region there are moreover (confusingly) two sets of statistics, one for the election of the regional president, another for the elections to the regional parliament.

While Signor Bonaccini won the regional presidency by a convincing margin (51.4% of the vote to Signora Borgonzoni’s 43.6% and a paltry 3.47% for the Five Star (left populist) Simone Benini), voting for the regional parliament was much closer than predicted by the opinion polls.

In the event, the centre left list took 48.7% to the right’s 45.5%, Five Star’s list polling only 3.4%.

The votes cast for the left were apportioned between the Democratic Party (liberal-left) on 34.59%, a Bonaccini support group (left) taking 5.8%, and several smaller green or leftist parties making up the balance of the left’s vote (excluding the Five Star movement, which, as we have seen, presented its own remarkably unsuccessful list).

The lion’s share of the vote on the right went to the Lega on 31.9%, with fourteen seats in the 48 member regional parliament, while the Fratelli d’Italia (who do not disguise or apologise for their fascist heritage) polled a satisfactory 8.6%, so taking three seats in the regional parliament. The rump of Berlusconi’s Forza Italia took the one remaining seat allocated to the right-wing parties.

Lega leader Matteo Salvini (above right) with his party’s regional candidate in Emilia-Romagna, Lucia Borgonzoni.

While some on the left have sought to portray the results in Emilia Romagna as a major blow to Matteo Salvini’s hopes of returning to power, in truth his list ran the left to within less than 4% of the vote in the left’s strongest region in the face of a national mobilisation of leftist activists.

The big winner in Emilia Romagna was turnout at 67.67%, up from a very low 38% at the previous regional elections. The big loser was the Five Star Movement. It presented a joint list with the Communists (once a major political party in Italy) but polled only 3.4%, below the threshold for representation in the regional parliament.

Meanwhile in the poor southern region of Calabria, the left was routed. Here the centre left vote was very fragmented across multiple lists, so that Forza Italia’s candidate took the regional presidency with an impressive 55.3% of the total vote, while the second placed candidate took only 30%, and multiple other lists share the remaining 14.7% of the vote.

Forza Italia took 12.58% of the vote on the party list system, the Lega 12.21% and the Fratelli a pleasing 11.14%. The vote on the left was ever more fragmented over multiple parties.

Jole Santelli (above left), winner of the Calabrian regional election, with her Forza Italia party leader, Silvio Berlusconi. While Forza Italia is now very much the smallest and declining partner in the populist right coalition nationwide, it is the largest coalition partner in Calabria.

While il Capitano was denied the victory in Emilia Romagna that would probably have led to the collapse of the present Five Star/Democratic Party coalition that clings tenuously to power in Rome, both the Lega and the Fratelli continue to make encouraging progress, while Five Star is on the verge of collapse.

To put Five Star’s performance in context, it is still the largest party in the Italian parliament, but now faces annihilation whenever and wherever new elections are held. It was the future once, but is now given over to internecine strife so bitter that its former leader, Luigi di Maio, resigned a few days ago, saying that his real enemies were all elected representatives of his own party, which sounds even worse than our own, dear Labour party.

While nothing is certain in an uncertain world, it does seem likely that a Lega/Fratelli/Forza Italia coalition will at some point take power in Rome, but this time, unlike in 1922, by completely lawful and democratic means.

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