Solsticial greetings from H&D!

The editor and staff of Heritage and Destiny wish all readers a very happy Summer Solstice today.

Europeans have celebrated this day since Neolithic times, marking the turning point of the year and its longest day.

Whatever your religion (or lack of religion), the Solstice is a time when we are in touch with our ancestors, and when we renew our commitment to preserve European identity.

At this time we also pay tribute to the astonishing ingenuity of our ancestors in creating monuments associated with the Solstice, notably Stonehenge in Wiltshire, whose construction began more than 5,000 years ago.

This year the Solstice happens to coincide with the European football championships, though how European some of the ‘national’ teams are is very questionable!

It also coincides with a UK General Election campaign, on which H&D will be reporting further in the next few days.

For electoral and other reasons, as Europe faces military assault from the Kremlin and cultural assault from within, it would be easy to despair.

But the Solstice reminds us that our culture has survived many threats. Europeans have a great future as well as a great past. All we need is the will to assert our identity: pride in the achievements and continuing potential of our race.

Fighting for race and nation at the ballot box

While the rest of Europe is engaged in elections for a ‘Parliament’ that has little genuine power over European institutions, nominations were published this weekend across the UK for the General Election on 4th July.

H&D readers will have varying views on the efficacy of contesting such elections, but we can all agree that the list of candidates reflects a slow but perceptible recovery from the disaster inflicted on our movement by Nick Griffin’s destruction of the BNP more than a decade ago.

There are two main groups of nationalist candidates. The British Democrats, who achieved a handful of strong results at the local council elections last month, are fighting four constituencies: Basildon & Billericay (where Chris Bateman is standing against Conservative Party chairman Richard Holden); Faversham & Mid Kent (Lawrence Rustem); Maidstone & Malling (Gary Butler); and Doncaster North (where Frank Calladine is up against former Labour leader Ed Miliband).

Mr Calladine is the only racial nationalist candidate in the UK who will not have a Reform UK opponent.

Three of the British Democrat candidates are already parish councillors. They understand that in present circumstances it’s difficult to contest parliamentary elections – party chairman and H&D patron Dr Jim Lewthwaite has emphasised that nationalism is a long-term project – but it’s important to offer the British people a genuine choice, and to take a step forward in rebuilding nationalism amid the collapse of the Tory party and the transformation of mainstream politics.

The English Democrats (unlike the Brit Dems) are primarily a civic nationalist party, but their candidates this year include several staunch racial nationalists, as well as others whose main focus is on constitutional reform. The party’s platform highlights a pledge to “end immigration now!”

The fifteen ED candidates nationwide include the well-known anti-immigration campaigner Steve Laws in Dover & Deal, and four members of Patriotic Alternative: Thomas Bryer in Makerfield, Craig Buckley in Leigh & Atherton, Patrick McGrath in Bolton West, and Matthew Darrington in Newark.

Also standing for the EDs are party chairman Robin Tilbrook (Brentwood & Ongar), former Brexit Party founding chairman Catherine Blaiklock (Great Yarmouth), and longstanding campaigners for an English Parliament such as Steve Morris (contesting Bury South for the first time, having earlier stood in many council elections).

Two former BNP activists are standing as independents on anti-immigration manifestos: Joe Owens in Liverpool Wavertree, and Dr Andrew Emerson in Chichester.

Later this week H&D will analyse the campaign so far, and examine potential benefits for our cause from the present political drama.

May 1945: Whose Victory?

Tomorrow the UK and her western allies from the Second World War will celebrate the 79th anniversary of ‘Victory in Europe’ – VE Day.

The former Soviet Union – now ruled by a neo-Stalinist – celebrates its own victory over Europe a day later on 9th May, and we can expect the usual Kremlin festivities.

Yet even setting aside Putin’s war, Britons are this year more likely than ever to be asking – just whose victory was it in 1945? Is today’s Europe a victory? Is today’s Europe even European?

This week in Leeds – England’s fifth largest city – an elected councillor celebrated his own victory with cries of “Allahu Akbar”! (“God is Great”!)

He was echoed in dozens of local council seats around England where independent Muslim candidates (usually from Pakistan, Bangladesh or India) defeated the mainstream political parties.

But is this really a victory for ‘Allah’, or for a very different anti-European deity?

Sadiq Khan (above right) is falsely portrayed as an ‘Islamist’, when in fact he is fully embedded within the globalist power structure. Here is London’s Mayor with Sir Gerald Ronson, veteran of the violent ‘anti-fascist’ 62 Group, convicted fraudster, and head of the main Jewish community ‘defence organisation’.

Racial nationalists (especially those who observe British politics from a distance and without detailed knowledge) might imagine that these few dozen council victories demonstrate the power of Islam in the UK.

The reality is the opposite: they demonstrate the political weakness of Muslims in the UK.

Despite Israel’s brutal assault on Gaza, there was never any doubt that both the ruling Conservatives and the opposition Labour Party – the government-in-waiting – would maintain their pro-Zionist policy. That’s why dozens of Muslim politicians in English towns and cities quit their safe careers within the Labour Party and declared an open political war against Zionism.

Labour leader Sir Keir Starmer has been perfectly prepared to lose control of one or two councils, and lose perhaps 70-80 council seats, because he knows that his accession to the premiership later this year will depend on far more powerful forces than the UK’s Muslim voters. England’s best known Muslim politician, London Mayor Sadiq Khan, decided to stay on Starmer’s side, maintaining the tacit alliance with Zionism that has proved so beneficial to his career.

During the first hours of VE Day 79 years ago, a great European warrior knew precisely what was at stake. Léon Degrelle, who had been wounded several times fighting against Bolshevism on the Eastern Front, was unwilling to surrender. Together with a small group of comrades, he took off from Oslo and flew overnight across the continent before crash landing in Spain.

Degrelle’s extraordinary adventures and his continuing national socialist faith during the next half century are explored in the book Léon Degrelle in Exile which will be reviewed in the next edition of Heritage and Destiny.

Writing that review while contemplating the state of modern Britain, the anniversary of ‘VE Day’, and the recent 30th anniversary of Degrelle’s death, was a sobering experience for a British racial nationalist.

Author José Luis Jerez Riesco (above left) with Léon Degrelle in 1972. The book Léon Degrelle in Exile will be reviewed in the next edition of H&D.

Today we know that the ideology to which Degrelle dedicated his entire life – national socialism – is not some ossified relic, but a living, organic reality.

The present crop of Muslim politicians are merely the latest symptom of an ongoing distortion of European culture and civilisation – a perversion that was entrenched in 1945.

But a new generation of Europeans is fully worthy of Degrelle’s confidence that the true Europe would triumph.

Europa Invicta!

¡León Degrelle, presente!

May Day greetings from H&D – “Sumer is icumen in!”

In England as in many other European countries, May Day has been a traditional celebration for centuries. Appropriated by the political left in the late 19th century, the day in fact has no connection to Marxist socialism. The documented history of the festival goes back to the Roman holiday of Floralia, honouring the goddess of flowers, fertility and spring, and its pagan roots go back even further.

At 6 am this morning in Oxford, for example, the Choir of Magdalen College greeted the new season atop the college tower, while thousands of revellers assembled in the streets below. This tradition dates back to 1509, and ‘Sumer is icumen in’, sung by the choir in the video above, dates from the mid-13th century.

Meanwhile many Europeans today celebrated the traditional pagan festival of Beltane, linked to the Celtic god of fire.

In the UK and several other countries the festival is associated with the Maypole and traditional dancing. The famous dances involving intricate patterns of ribbons originated in Wales in the mid-14th century.

H&D sends May Day (or for our Welsh readers Calan Haf) greetings to all our comrades worldwide.

May Day at Stonehenge

Happy St George’s Day 2024!

The H&D team would like to wish all our English readers not just in England and other parts of the UK, in fact everywhere in the world, a very happy St George’s Day.

St George was not English – as all our enemies will constantly remind us every April 23rd – we all know that; but he is the patron saint of England (although not the original patron saint of the Anglo-Saxon English – that is St Edmund, whose day is celebrated on November 20th) and we celebrate him and his day as such.

While St George’s Day – April 23rd – is mainly forgotten, ignored or even ridiculed by the liberal / left establishment, who by the way have no qualms about promoting everybody else’s national day, culture and heritage apart from ours, we nationalists always remember and celebrate it with pride.

Sadly, some of the old gang parties and their corrupt Westminster politicians are now trying to jump on the bandwagon and to try to hijack our saint’s day, and promote it as some form of multi-cultural/multi-racial fest, and make a mockery of the whole day. We should expect no less of them.

However, just to give you an example of how (not) multi-cultural and/or multi-racial St George’s Day has become, three of the H&D team, including the editor and assistant editor attended a pre – Saint George’s Day event on the evening of April 19th, just outside of Preston city centre, organised by a servicemen’s group. Every single person there was White, and the majority of them were English, i.e. of Anglo-Saxon descent – even though Preston as a city is now well over 20% non-White.

As one of the greatest Englishmen of the 20th Century – Sir Oswald Mosley – said at a meeting in Manchester:

“In the lives of great nations comes the moment of decision, comes the moment of destiny; and this nation again and again in the great hours of fate has swept aside the little men of talk and delay and has decided to follow men and movements who say we go forward to action! Let who dare follow us in this hour.”

While many English (and British) nationalists feel a fierce national pride for the St George’s cross and the patron saint’s day, England in fact shares St George with a host of other countries and places. Each has its own unusual customs surrounding his feast day, including; 

St George miraculously fighting alongside King James I of Aragon at the Battle of El Puig in 1237, during the Reconquest of Valencia.

Spain – St George (San Jorge in Spanish or Sant Jordi in Catalan) is associated with several places in Spain especially in the north-east, where the army of Aragon was inspired by St George to defeat the Moors and their allies at the Battle of Alcoraz, leading to the ‘first Reconquista’ in the late 11th century. Some of the most colourful celebrations of the ‘Dia de Aragón‘ are in Barcelona. A public holiday is held in the area and has several similarities with Valentine’s Day, with roses and books being exchanged by lovers. Barcelona’s most popular street Las Ramblas becomes awash with flower and book sellers. Catalonia has managed to export the tradition as UNESCO adopted the date as World Book Day. And of course FC Barcelona have the St George cross in their club’s badge.

Ukraine – St George is traditionally venerated in Ukraine and associated with numerous patriotic symbols including St George’s Cathedral, Lviv (mother church of the Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church); the Kyivan Grand Prince Yaroslaw the Wise (978-1054); and numerous historic churches such as the 19th century wooden church of St George in the village of Zavorychi, Kyiv region, destroyed by Russian artillery during the first month of the invasion on 7th March 2022.

St George’s Cathedral, Lviv, Ukraine

Russia – The Russian Orthodox Church uses the Julian Calendar so St George’s Day is celebrated on the same day but it is 6th May, not 23rd April. As well as this date Russians also mark the consecration of the Church of St George in Kyiv on 26th November. This was traditionally the time of year when peasants were permitted to move to a different landowner. While this tradition has died out the Ribbon of St George is still one of the highest Russian military honours, ironically mainly associated with Stalin’s Red Army which fought for atheistic Bolshevism. The black and orange striped ribbon is also used by civilians as a symbol of what Moscow terms the ‘Great Patriotic War’ against Germany. It has been seen again recently displayed by separatists and Russian occupation forces in Ukraine as a Putinist symbol, because of its ‘anti-nazi’, pro-Kremlin associations.

Albania – Albanians celebrate St George’s day by going out and lighting a large bonfire and playing around it as a sign of joy.

Bulgaria – Roasting a whole lamb is traditional on St George’s Day in Bulgaria as he is the patron saint of shepherds. It is seen as a day when evil enchantments can be broken and a blessed day when the saint blesses the crop and morning dew, so many walk in the early morning to wash their face in the fresh dew. 

A statue in Zagreb, Croatia, shows St George killing the dragon

Croatia – Croats also use fire to mark St George’s Day which is considered the first day of Spring. In the Slavic tradition girls are dressed as goddesses in leaves and sing for locals. 

Back in England normally many local pubs in White working class areas (and even a few in the middle class suburbs) would organise events to celebrate St George’s Day, but most would now be content with just putting out a few England flags (then taking them down the next day – so as not to offend!)

However, St George’s Day and the spirit of St George will be celebrated at H&D Towers (where two England flags fly proudly all the year round) where the editor and assistant editor and other members of team will raise a glass a two to our patron saint, to England and to the English, while there’s still a few of us left! 

To quote England’s most famous playwright William Shakespeare, from his Henry V, first performed in 1598 but referring to the Battle of Agincourt, fought on the feast day of two other celebrated martyrs, the twins St Crispin and St Crispinian on 25th October 1415: 

This story shall the good man teach his son;
And Crispin Crispian shall ne’er go by,
From this day to the ending of the world,
But we in it shall be rememberèd;
We few, we happy few, we band of brothers;
For he to-day that sheds his blood with me
Shall be my brother; be he ne’er so vile,
This day shall gentle his condition:
And gentlemen in England now a-bed
Shall think themselves accurs’d they were not here,
And hold their manhood’s cheap whiles any speaks
That fought with us upon Saint Crispin’s day.

And finally to quote from a song now officially banned from the football terraces of England – but still sung anyway, when and where non-Woke England football supporters can get away with it! 
Keep St. George in my heart keep me English, 
Keep St. George in my heart I pray, 
Keep St. George in my heart keep me English, 
Keep me English till my dying day!
No Surrender, No Surrender,
No surrender to the I-R-A!

Happy St Edmund’s Day from all at H&D

The H&D team wishes all readers a Happy St Edmund’s Day, celebrating England’s original patron saint!

While St George (who had no historical connection to England) is commonly regarded as our Patron Saint, the original Patron Saint of England was St Edmund, who was King of East Anglia for about fourteen years until he was killed by Danish invaders in 869.

These invaders destroyed all records of Edmund’s reign, so it’s no longer even known precisely when and where he was born.

But about 150 years after his death, the Anglo-Danish King Canute converted to Christianity and began the tradition of venerating St Edmund as a Christian martyr and Patron Saint of England. For the next 500 years the abbey that Canute founded to house his relics, at Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, was one of England’s most important shrines, attracting pilgrims from across the country.

The Wilton Diptych, one of the most important survivals of mediaeval English art, includes this depiction of St Edmund (above left).

Mediaeval chroniclers depicted Edmund as having been born in Nuremberg and descended from Saxon kings. His actual birthplace is uncertain, though we do know that the East Anglia over which he ruled was one of several Anglo-Saxon kingdoms in what later became England, and was established around 550 by Germanic tribes arriving from the Frisian region (in what is now the Netherlands and north-western Germany) and Jutland (in what is now Denmark).

St Edmund’s origins, his death, and even the date of his feast day, combine to make him a highly appropriate patron saint of England in 2023 – when more than ever we should be aware of our racial roots and aware of the need for solidarity with our fellow Europeans against the encroaching tyranny of the multiracial new world order.

The flag of St Edmund was England’s original symbol, long before the flag of St George

Liberals tell us we are a nation of immigrants, and point to the successive waves of migration that created England: including Edmund and his Anglo-Saxon ancestors, as well as the Viking invaders who killed him.

Racial nationalists by contrast understand that our fellow Europeans are our racial cousins, whereas the offspring of non-Europeans remain fundamentally alien, whether they were born in London or Lagos.

So whether he was born in Nuremberg or Norwich, St Edmund was an English king and a European king.

A statue of St Edmund stands outside St Edmundsbury Cathedral

The fact that 20th November is the Feast Day of St Edmund, King and Martyr, is also appropriate for another reason. Today on the frontline of the European racial nationalist battle against alien tyranny, our Spanish comrades mark the anniversary of the martyrdom of José Antonio Primo de Rivera, the Falangist leader murdered by communists on this day 87 years ago. November 20th has for decades been a day of pilgrimage for Spanish nationalists to the Valley of the Fallen, where José Antonio was buried in a vast basilica carved out of a mountain near Madrid.

Earlier this year, the 21st century equivalents of his murderers succeeded in desecrating José Antonio’s grave at this memorial to the victims of the Spanish Civil War. H&D‘s European correspondent Isabel Peralta reported from Madrid on the day of his reburial (see below), and also reported on the tyrannical “democratic memory law” by which Spain’s left-wing government is imposing a particular version of history. In this one-eyed ‘history’, the Spanish communists and their allies are to be treated as heroes – in fact Spain last year introduced a new postage stamp celebrating its Communist Party – whereas nationalists are to be damned as villains.

The battle for Europe continues (in its most acute form during the past fortnight on the streets of Madrid) – and St Edmund is the ideal patron saint for Englishmen to concentrate our minds on this battle. So let us all celebrate St Edmund today, just as we celebrate the legacy of José Antonio, and celebrate the new generation of racial nationalists who will reclaim and rebuild a Europe fit for Europeans.

Hindu tribal vote saves Tories in Uxbridge: civic nationalists fail again

Prime Minister Rishi Sunak (above, far right) with his wife and her Indian billionaire parents. The Hindu vote saved Sunak’s party in this week’s Uxbridge by-election

On a generally disastrous night for Rishi Sunak’s Conservative Party, the Prime Minister was saved by his fellow Hindus from what would otherwise have been a historic hat-trick of defeats.

Two safe Tory seats were lost on massive swings – the rural West Country constituency Somerton & Frome falling to the Liberal Democrats, and the previously ultra-Tory North Yorkshire constituency of Selby & Ainsty electing a Labour MP.

But Uxbridge & South Ruislip in North West London – which should have been a much easier target for Labour – narrowly stayed Tory with a wafer-thin majority of 495 votes.

With good reason, most of the media will focus on the London Mayor’s unpopular ‘Ulez’ policy – the extension of the Ultra Low Emission Zone that imposes a fee on drivers of the most polluting vehicles. The Conservative campaign in Uxbridge focused almost entirely on this issue, even though in principle Ulez was first agreed by the Conservative London Mayor Boris Johnson in 2015. No doubt the Tories were also helped by their candidate being a local, middle-aged family man; whereas Labour brought in a young homosexual candidate from Camden (a very different part of London). However we should also note that another young homosexual candidate won a historic victory for Labour on the same day in Selby & Ainsty.

One of Sunak’s first acts as Prime Minister was to conduct a Hindu ceremony in Downing Street

But the media will ignore another vital factor. Uxbridge & South Ruislip is 8.6% Hindu (almost five times the national average of 1.8%). Evidence from local elections since Sunak became leader has shown that Hindus have swung heavily to the Tories (evidently for tribal reasons), and many Tories have close ties to the Hindu fundamentalist government of Indian prime minister Narendra Modi. The problem for Sunak and his party is that there are not that many constituencies in the UK where Hindus are a significant electoral force. England is 6.7% Muslim but only 1.8% Hindu.

This week’s by-elections were yet another predictable disaster for civic nationalism. UKIP (now a moribund shadow of the party that won 24 European parliamentary seats and forced David Cameron to promise a Brexit referendum) fought two of the three, and polled joke votes even by their standards. UKIP deputy leader Rebecca Jane took only 61 votes (0.2%) in Uxbridge, and might be wishing she was back in one of her old roles as ‘reality TV’ contestant and Marilyn Monroe impersonator. Peter Richardson in Somerton & Frome fared only slightly better with 0.7%.

UKIP’s efforts to campaign against illegal immigration cannot rescue this dying civic nationalist party.

By far the biggest name in civic nationalism, actor Laurence Fox, stood in Uxbridge for his Reclaim party which is little more than a one-man band, but well-financed. His 714 votes (2.3%) were an improvement on the 1% taken by his former deputy Martin Daubney in Reclaim’s previous by-election effort (North Shropshire in December 2021), but Fox’s donors must be starting to wonder whether this is the best use of their cash.

The anti-vaccination campaigner Piers Corbyn (brother of former Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn) also stood in Uxbridge but polled only 101 votes (0.3%): perhaps even his strongest supporters will now wake up to the fact that there is absolutely no electoral potential in peddling conspiracy theories about the pandemic.

Laurence Fox (above right) with leading supporters of his floundering civic nationalist party Reclaim.

In Somerton & Frome, Reform UK (which is clearly the largest successor party to UKIP on the civic nationalist scene, but equally clearly is failing to make any serious headway) lost yet another deposit, polling 1,303 votes (3.4%).

Similarly in Selby & Ainsty, Reform UK took only 1,332 votes (3.7%), beaten not only by the Greens but by the regionalist Yorkshire Party. Another ex-UKIP splinter party, the Heritage Party (founded by half-Jamaican anti-vaccination campaigner David Kurten) managed just 162 votes (0.5%).

These were the ninth and tenth successive Reform UK lost deposits in parliamentary by-elections: a stark contrast to some national opinion polls and the regular hyping of the party by Nigel Farage and his friends at GB News.

The truth is that the ‘free market’ capitalist ideology that underpins both Reform UK and the Tories offers no solution to the UK’s immigration crisis and related crises in housing and transport policy.

The challenge for any racial nationalist party that gets its act together to fill the UK’s political vacuum will be to link London’s chronic overcrowding to the transport issue. Crude populist gestures against the ‘Ulez’ policy won’t suffice. Nationalists have to reclaim the green agenda as our own, not reject it – but we need to explain that a green agenda means ending the mass immigration, multiculti madness.

H&D pulls no punches in post-election analysis

After several days of reflection on last week’s local elections. H&D‘s assistant editor Peter Rushton has written a hard-hitting analysis of the results, seeking to draw some long overdue, hard lessons for our movement.

Peter has a long record of practical electoral activism as well as academic analysis. Click here to read his new article.

Facts and figures on the election can be found here.

Time for nationalists to decide: are we serious?

Professional politicians are notorious for ‘spinning’ even the most unfavourable election results, looking for a silver lining to the darkest clouds.

As racial nationalists, we have to be more honest than these ‘spin doctors’. Last week’s elections were appalling. They reflected years of decline, years of factional division, years of vanity, years of crank obsessions, years of tolerating substandard conduct within our ranks.

One of the most decent and intelligent men in nationalism, Jim Lewthwaite, who was elected BNP councillor for Wyke ward in Bradford with 1,583 votes in 2004, and was runner-up with 701 votes in the same ward as a British Democrat candidate in 2019, polled only 140 votes (5.1%) in Wyke this year.

To his credit, Jim finished ahead of a Reform UK candidate, but the verdict of most of his old voters was “none of the above”.

Mick Treacy, organiser of Oldham BNP in its glory years and twice council candidate for Hollinwood

In Hollinwood ward, Oldham, National Housing Party leader John Lawrence polled 205 votes (7.6%). Though far from the worst result in 2023, this followed twenty years of nationalist decline in Hollinwood and the surrounding area. In 2002 Oldham BNP organiser Mick Treacy achieved 736 votes (23.9%) here; a year later this fell slightly to 503 votes (22.8%) and a much diminished and divided BNP never contested Hollinwood again.

UKIP eventually picked up the disillusioned White working class vote in Hollinwood, polling 37.2% in 2014, 28.9% in 2015, 30.3% in 2016, and 25.9% in 2019.

John Lawrence and NHP grew out of activity in the Hollinwood area by ‘Tommy Robinson’ (formerly of the EDL). The party is anti-immigration though non-‘racist’. In 2022 Lawrence polled 174 votes (10.1%), falling to just 59 votes (3.7%) in a misfiring by-election campaign last November, and now bouncing back slightly to 7.6% this year.

The Oldham race riots in 2001 were the most dramatic manifestation of problems that continue to beset many northern towns and which should lead to electoral opportunities for nationalist parties.

For many reasons, partly connected to allegations of local government corruption and ‘grooming’ scandals, there should be enormous potential for racial nationalism in this ward and in the rest of Oldham. Yet quite clearly that potential is not being mined. This year three Asian Conservatives were elected in Hollinwood! The new Tory councillors include Kamran Ghafoor, who was convicted and fined in 2012 for offences under the Housing Act, after failing to ensure that a property he rented out was safe to live in.

Another nationalist failure was in Swanscombe ward, Dartford, where Britain First leader Paul Golding polled a fraction under 5%. Britain First is an anti-Islam, anti-immigration, but multiracialist party that (like the NHP) has recruited both from the EDL scene and among ex-BNP activists such as Golding himself. Golding had no opposition from Reform UK, UKIP or any of its splinter parties. This was a ward where UKIP polled 16.5% in 2019 and even higher votes in earlier years, yet despite fighting only seven wards across the whole of England this year, Britain First polled less than 5% here.

Compared to past years, when many of our potential voters were seduced either by UKIP, the Brexit Party, or Boris Johnson’s Tories, nationalists ought to have been pushing at an open door this year.

Support for the Tories among White working class voters has collapsed since Rishi Sunak became Prime Minister. But no nationalist party has been able to benefit so far.

Rishi Sunak’s Tories have far less appeal to White working class Britons than their counterparts had in the Boris Johnson era. Brexit is no longer an issue, immigration remains out of control, and lower income families are hard-pressed by the cost of living crisis.

Yet British nationalism has suffered such damage (partly self-inflicted) during the past decade that hardly any of our candidates made a serious impact with voters.

There were very few honourable exceptions. Julian Leppert was an excellent councillor in Epping Forest, and although he lost his seat after four years on the council, his result (25.2%) stood out from a generally dismal crowd.

Yet even here, the question must be asked: why did the British Democrats (Julian’s party for the past year since the closure of For Britain) not begin leafletting the moment he joined their party?

Given that there were no elections in London this year, why were there not more activists out on the streets of Waltham Abbey for months before the campaign formally started, introducing the Brit Dems and highlighting Julian’s excellent record of fighting for local residents? (Again there are a few honourable exceptions: several Londoners did make the effort and should be commended for continuing to fly the flag for nationalism and avoiding disillusionment.)

Why are many nationalists in 2023 happier to protest about drag queens, or go on marches to promote conspiracy theories about CoViD, while seeming to lose interest in serious racial nationalism – especially the essential hard slog of election campaigning?

To be fair, the British Democrats have made considerable progress during the last year or two, recruiting several valuable activists. The real problems date back more than a decade, to the rapid collapse of Nick Griffin’s BNP.

Andrew Brons (above left with the late Richard Edmonds and the late Ken Booth) almost succeeded in rescuing the BNP in 2011: it has been downhill for racial nationalism ever since.

When Andrew Brons narrowly failed to oust Griffin as BNP chairman in the leadership election of July 2011, it was obvious that a new party would soon be needed, yet it took years to get that party off the ground. More than 2,300 BNP members voted in that leadership election: 1,157 for Griffin and 1,148 for Brons. Probably fewer than 100 of these are today active in any nationalist party.

During recent weeks there have been arguments between Patriotic Alternative leaders and some of their former colleagues, now in the Homeland Party, about whether PA has made sufficient efforts to register as a political party, and to convert its undoubted success online into “real world” activity.

I don’t intend to take sides in that argument, because I don’t know the full facts.

But questions need to be asked as to why so many nationalists are happier on social media than on doorsteps. This applies to civic nationalists in Reform UK, UKIP and its splinters, even more than to racial nationalists.

Part of the problem is defeatism, engendered by a style of politics that overemphasises conspiracies and the presumed power of our enemies.

Of course we face great obstacles – legal, financial, and political – but these are far from insuperable. Nationalist campaigns have repeatedly punched above our weight and shocked the political establishment – especially in Burnley, Oldham, Blackburn, Barking & Dagenham and many other council areas during the 2000s – but for whatever reason, we no longer seem capable of delivering at the ballot box.

Some nationalists argue that elections are a waste of time, but they have so far failed to explain an alternative strategy.

As far back as the 1980s, Steve Brady (then a member of the National Front Directorate) explained a “ladder strategy” by which nationalists could establish networks of local branches by building on local community campaigning. Elections are certainly not the only element of this strategy, but if nationalists aren’t capable of organising a serious local election campaign, how are any of us supposed to believe that they can lead a racial nationalist revolution?

H&D editor Mark Cotterill was elected a borough councillor in Blackburn in 2006 with 858 votes (43.6%). By contrast the highest nationalist vote in 2023 was 25.2%.

As we have consistently argued in H&D, there are only two good reasons to be involved in politics. First, to present an ideologically solid solution to the problems of our race and nation, educating the best of our new recruits. Second, to build towards gaining power, locally and eventually nationally, so as to put this ideology into action.

Sometimes one of these objectives has to be prioritised over the other; sometimes they can work in parallel; sometimes different nationalists have to devote their efforts to one or the other.

Tragically what we are left with in 2023 is a movement that too often fulfils neither objective – instead abandoning serious ideology to pursue crank fads (often imported online from the USA) that are of no relevance to the racial nationalist cause, but also have no substantial appeal to the British electorate.

Three good examples are a trio of intellectually flimsy, unBritish, indeed anti-British and anti-European political cults: Trumpism, anti-vaxxism, and Putinism.

If any individual nationalist truly believes that Donald Trump presents a genuine challenge to the New World Order; or that vaccinations and even the pandemic itself were some sort of scam or conspiracy; or that the brutal anti-European dictator Vladimir Putin is in some sense a champion of traditional European values – then they are welcome to pursue these eccentric views.

But once any or all of these cults infect a nationalist party or movement, they become a toxic threat to our cause. The vast majority of British voters will never believe that CoViD vaccinations were a mass poisoning plot; they will never take Donald Trump seriously; and they will never support Putin’s semi-Asiatic hordes.

Opposition to CoViD vaccines was especially prevalent among ethnic minorities and often descended into crankism. Antivaxx campaigns are at best a pointless distraction for racial nationalists and have no potential to build widespread support for our cause.

The inevitable unpopularity of these causes would not matter if any of them were essential to our core racial nationalist ideology: but they aren’t. At best they are a distraction, at worst a fatal liability.

Urgent priorities for rebuilding nationalism in 2023 should involve identifying topical issues in target wards: questions of immediate local concern that can be explained to voters in ways that make the underlying ideology of racial nationalism clearly relevant to their daily lives.

We have the great advantage that truth is on our side, and truth cannot be suppressed forever. And we should avoid the tempting excuse that the system is rigged, or that ‘they’ control everything so there’s no point in any form of practical resistance other than ranting on social media.

The political conspirator Cassius, in Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar, tells a comrade:
“The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars
But in ourselves, that we are underlings.

In 2023 racial nationalists should not blame the system, or the media, or our opponents. Such obstacles will always exist. But with sufficient will and intelligence, they can be overcome.

Local Elections 2023

Julian Leppert (above centre) with the British Democrat team at his election count today

for updated list of this year’s nationalist results, click here

England’s last racial nationalist councillor – Julian Leppert in Waltham Abbey Paternoster ward, Epping Forest – was defeated in Thursday’s elections. Julian polled 187 votes (25.2%), which is likely to be the best nationalist election result this year, but lost his seat to a Conservative candidate.

This year Julian was standing as a British Democrat, having been elected four years ago for the now-defunct For Britain Movement (and having been a BNP councillor a decade ago).

Julian Leppert (second right) celebrating his election as an Epping Forest councillor four years ago: he lost his seat this week.

Most of England held local elections on 4th May – a first chance for voters to give a verdict on the latest reinvention of the Conservative Party under Prime Minister Rishi Sunak. These elections were also a final chance for Reform UK, the civic nationalist party that grew out of Nigel Farage’s Brexit Party but has so far failed to make any serious impact.

For H&D readers, one of the most interesting results was in Walkden North ward, Salford, where Ashlea Simon of Britain First polled 405 votes (18.2%).

This was down from 508 votes (21.6%) last year, but realistically it was another good result for Ms Simon and her party, given that this year they faced opposition from Reform UK, who finished bottom of the poll with only 68 votes (3.0%).

Britain First candidate Ashlea Simon with her campaign team at last night’s election count in Salford

Britain First focused a great deal of effort on this Salford campaign, and the result contrasted with nearby Broadheath ward, Trafford, where their candidate Donald Southworth polled 153 votes (3.6%). Paul Harding managed 214 votes (13.1%) in Hockley & Ashingdon ward, Rochford; Nick Lambert 108 votes (12.6%) in Ballard ward, New Forest; and Nick Scanlon 61 votes (10.2%) in Darenth ward, Dartford. The Britain First candidates in Bideford South ward, Torridge, polled 15%, benefiting from the fact that the Tories did not contest the ward. Ironically the second-worst Britain First result was for their leader Paul Golding, who polled 6.9% in Swanscombe ward, Dartford.

Former BNP councillor Graham Partner achieved another of the best nationalist results overnight, with 94 votes (15.9%) as independent candidate for Hermitage ward, NW Leicestershire. Another nationalist standing without a party label was David Hyden, backed by activists from the new Homeland Party: he polled 81 votes (5.7%) in Cannock South ward, Cannock Chase.

The National Front’s sole candidate this year was Tim Knowles, who polled 40 votes (1.8%) in Codnor, Langley Mill & Aldercar, Amber Valley.

One of England’s newest (civic) nationalist parties – the National Housing Party UK – had three candidates this year. Callum Leat polled 228 votes (10.3%) in Dodington ward, South Gloucestershire. Former BNP and For Britain Movement activist Gary Bergin polled 149 votes (4.1%) in Claughton ward, Wirral. And NHPUK leader John Lawrence polled 205 votes (7.6%) in Hollinwood ward, Oldham.

Dr Andrew Emerson, a former BNP candidate who has for some years been the sole candidate of his own small party Patria, polled 6.4% in Chichester East ward, Chichester.

The first British Democrat results overnight were in Essex. In Kursaal ward, Southend, former East London BNP activist Steve Smith polled 42 votes (2.6%), finishing narrowly ahead of a candidate from the Heritage Party (a civic nationalist splinter from UKIP) who polled 2.1%. Mr Smith’s Brit Dem colleague Chris Bateman fared slightly better in Laindon Park ward, Basildon, with 89 votes (4.2%).

The British Democrats had better news during today’s counts, with Julian Leppert’s 25.2% (see above) being easily the best nationalist result this year, though David Haslett faced a tough campaign in the multiracial Saffron ward, Leicester, and polled 34 votes (1.9%). In Wyke ward, Bradford, Brit Dem leader Dr Jim Lewthwaite polled 140 votes (5.1%), finishing five votes ahead of a Reform UK opponent.

Steve Smith’s 2.6% in Southend was one of the overnight British Democrat results

Some very poor overnight results for Reform UK indicated that they have very little genuine local activism, despite high profile backing at national level from the likes of Nigel Farage and GB News. (Speaking of GB News, one of their political commentators Sophie Corcoran was heavily defeated as Tory candidate for Chadwell St Mary ward, Thurrock.)

Even in Lichfield, where former Tory mayor Barry Gwilt defected to Reform UK earlier this year, neither Mr Gwilt nor any other Reform UK candidate stood for election this week.

The only good news for Reform UK so far has been in by far their best branch – Derby – where they retained six seats across their two wards, Alvaston North and Alvaston South.

Alan Graves (above, third left) is one of very few successful branch organisers in Reform UK: his Derby branch retained six city council seats.

One of the very few really active Reform UK branches is in Bolton, where they had 34 candidates, but none were elected. (Their strongest Bolton vote was 17% in Farnworth North.)

Even in areas such as Lincolnshire’s South Kesteven council (which includes Margaret Thatcher’s birthplace Grantham), where Sunak’s Conservatives lost many votes and seats, the ‘protest vote’ went to independents rather than to Reform UK or any of the UKIP splinter parties (two of which have already closed down). It seems that the Farage era is very definitely over.

Further confirmation of this came from Boston, another Lincolnshire council, which was one of the main UKIP and Brexit Party target areas of the past decade. UKIP lost their last remaining Boston council seat yesterday. Reform UK contested just one Boston ward, where they finished with only 4%, behind an English Democrat candidate on 7%.

English Democrat leader Robin Tilbrook polled 10.3% in Shelley ward, Epping Forest. Nationwide the EDs had five candidates, including Steve and Val Morris in Bury who polled 6.1% and 2.9% respectively.

Election counts continued this afternoon. H&D will have full reports and analysis on results as they arrive throughout the day.

(There were no elections this week in Scotland or Wales. Northern Ireland’s local elections are on 18th May.)

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