End of an era: Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh RIP

(above left) The Duke of Edinburgh in 2006 at Basra Air Station, Iraq, with the Commanding Officer and soldiers of the Queen’s Royal Hussars Battle Group

We are sorry to learn of the death of the Queen’s consort, Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh, earlier today at the age of 99.

The Duke was one of the last living links to a very different Britain that was still British, when we still manufactured some of the highest quality goods in the world, and when people could still leave their doors unlocked.

Moreover he was perhaps the last of a generation of VIPs who were unafraid of political incorrectness. Those of our readers in the Forces or ex-Forces will remember the Duke’s lifelong commitment to veterans and associated charities.

There will be much more to be said about the Duke’s life and connections – and a few surprises from the archives. But today is not the time for that. We send our condolences to HM The Queen.

Campaigning for the local government elections is likely to be suspended as a mark of respect. H&D editor Mark Cotterill will be in touch with campaign volunteers to inform them of any revised schedules.

Labour councillor resigns after porn charges

Former Labour councillor Martin Judd

A Labour councillor for the Hollinwood ward of Oldham Council has resigned and last week appeared in court facing charges of downloading child pornography.

Martin Judd, 25, entered not guilty pleas at Manchester Minshull Street Crown Court to three charges that between February 2018 and Febriary 2020 he had downloaded fifteen Category A (the most serious) images of children, twenty-three Category B, and 48 Category C.

Judd was committed for trial in Manchester next January.

Born in New Zealand, Judd was elected as a Hollinwood ward councillor in 2018. A year earlier he had been elected in Manchester as the youngest every President of a Rotary Club. (He worked for Waitrose in Manchester city centre.)

Some H&D readers will remember Hollinwood ward from the early 2000s: Oldham BNP organiser Mick Treacy polled 24% in the ward at the 2002 elections.

Since those days of curse Oldham BNP has ceased to exist, and in any case there can be no by-elections for the time being due to Covid-19.

Will the 2021 elections be postponed again?

London Mayor Sadiq Khan should have faced re-election last year, will the contest be postponed again this year?

Election officials in Lancashire have written to the government suggesting that this year’s local elections should again be postponed – or else held on an all-postal basis, due to the Covid-19 pandemic making it unsafe or impractical to hold elections as scheduled on May 6th.

The 2020 elections – including the London mayoralty and Greater London Assembly – were postponed in the early stages of the pandemic. This means that already many councillors and mayors have served an extra 12 months, and that this year’s elections were in any case going to combine the scheduled 2020 and 2021 contests.

There have been conflicting messages as to whether it’s feasible for the elections to go ahead this year. North West England was one of several regions that had an experimental ‘pilot’ project of all-postal elections in 2004, which resulted in a significantly increased turnout, but for various reasons it was decided not to continue the experiment.

Controversial journalist Katie Hopkins this week joined UKIP – but this year’s elections (even if they go ahead) might well be the party’s last stand

For racial nationalists this year might have seen the first electoral test for the new Patriotic Alternative party, if the Electoral Commission approve its registration in time. The National Front and the For Britain Movement will certainly have a few candidates if the elections go ahead, while Dr Jim Lewthwaite intends to stand in Bradford for the British Democratic Party. The late Richard Edmonds had planned to stand for the NF in last year’s elections before they were postponed, and had he lived would have been a candidate in May this year.

Any elections this year might also see the last gasp of UKIP and the debut of Nigel Farage’s new Reform UK party.

Perhaps more seriously, it could be the last gasp of the Union, with the Scottish National Party set to make further gains at the expense of both Labour and the Tories, and perhaps setting the scene for a second independence referendum. The decision whether to postpone this year’s elections north of the border rests with Nicola Sturgeon’s devolved government, so it’s possible there could be elections in Scotland, but none in England or Wales. No elections are scheduled this year in any case in Northern Ireland.

The spy story that helped derail Lady Renouf’s Dresden trial

Sir Frank Renouf (above left) with his close friend and colleague for many years, Hermann Abs, widely accused of financial ‘war crimes’

H&D‘s assistant editor Peter Rushton today reveals an extraordinary Second World War spy story – previously unknown to military and intelligence historians.

This story was one of the reasons for Dresden prosecutors’ abandonment of their prosecution of Lady Michèle Renouf three months ago. It had taken two and a half years for this prosecution to come to court.

Lady Renouf was charged with having committed ‘holocaust denial’ during an impromptu speech at a public commemoration in Dresden in 2018. Part of her ‘crime’ was to state that it had not been “exceptionally cruel” for Germany to intern Jews, given the fact that organised Jewry had declared war on Germany and that its representatives were closely involved in various forms of overt and covert warfare on the British (and later Soviet and American) side.

Lady Michèle and Sir Frank Renouf

H&D‘s Peter Rushton was a research consultant to the Renouf defence, and today he releases part of a dossier that would have caused great embarrassment to the German and British authorities had the case come to trial.

This reveals the existence of a previously unreported spy at the heart of the Third Reich – half-Jewish banker Robi Mendelssohn, partner in his family bank Mendlessohn & Co., the largest private bank in 1930s Germany.

Mendelssohn was an MI6 agent in wartime Berlin, meeting with British intelligence officers during his business trips to neutral Stockholm.

The case raises numerous previously unreported questions about the state of British intelligence regarding wartime Germany, including the so-called ‘Holocaust’.

Robi Mendelssohn: half-Jewish banker and MI6 spy in wartime Berlin

And it is of special relevance to the Renouf case because for complex reasons it turns out that MI6 spy Robi Mendelssohn was the man who convinced British occupation authorities to reinstal accused ‘war criminal’ Hermann Abs at the centre of reconstructing Germany’s postwar banking system.

Abs went on to be the closest colleague and friend of Lady Renouf’s former husband Sir Frank Renouf, who was awarded the Verdienstkreuz (Germany’s highest civilian honour) for his work with Abs in transforming German investment banking.

Click here to read today’s extraordinary story at the Renouf trial blog: modeltrial.blogspot.com

Further details will appear in the March edition of H&D.

Police fine relatives of IRA pub bombing victims

‘Justice for the 21’ campaigner Julie Hambleton

Julie Hambleton (and five other relatives) whose 18-year-old sister Maxine was murdered by the IRA in the 1974 Birmingham Pub Bombings, has been given a £200 fine by West Midlands Police, for allegedly breaking the Government’s Covid lock-down laws, by attending a memorial to the 21 killed in the IRA attacks. Julie (and the others) have refused to pay the fines and will have their day in court.

The memorial was attended by hundreds of “Justice for the 21” supporters last November in Birmingham. After a cavalcade through England’s second city, Julie said she asked her supporters to disperse and go home.

However, West Midlands Police – the very same Police Force that bent over backwards to help the Communist Black Lives Matter protesters last year, pathetically “bending the knee” to a career criminal and abuser of women (George Floyd) – issued her and the other five with fixed penalty notices, saying that they were “proportionate and necessary”!

Their lawyers had asked for the fines to be annulled given the ‘sensitivities’ and the fact that they were attending a ‘carefully planned’ event, but West Midland Police force has refused, meaning the six will now end up in court.

Birmingham’s Tavern in the Town pub after the IRA bomb exploded

Twenty-one mainly young people from Birmingham, having a night out in the city centre, were killed by the IRA and another 220 injured when devices exploded within minutes of each other in two city centre pubs (The Tavern In the Town and the Mulberry Bush) on November 21, 1974.

West Midlands Police, wasted millions of taxpayers’ money, by arresting the so called “Birmingham Six” – members of the IRA’s Birmingham Brigade, who were later found guilty of the 21 murders in 1975.

However, their convictions were eventually overturned after one of Britain’s worst miscarriages of justice. One of H&D‘s Patrons, the late Jock Spooner – who was working in Birmingham that evening (driving his taxi) – many years later told us that it was common knowledge in the city, amongst the Irish community, that the “Birmingham Six” did not carry out the bombing, as for one thing the IRA’s “Birmingham Brigade” was pretty useless, and spent most of their time “talking big and drinking in Digbeth rather than fighting the British”.

And it was in fact the IRA’s much better organised “Coventry Brigade”, that carried out the bombings.

Birmingham IRA men wrongly convicted for the 1974 bombings, actually committed by their Coventry ‘comrades’

In November last year, families and campaigners organised an event to mark the 46th anniversary of the bombings and to highlight the Justice for the 21 campaign. England was in the second national lockdown at the time.

Beforehand, Julie, who has led the families’ long fight for justice, worked with a team from West Midlands Police to ensure traffic disruption was at a minimum and that the event complied with Covid regulations. Which by all accounts it did. On the day, hundreds of supporters in cars and vans and on motorbikes took part in a cavalcade which threaded its way through Birmingham, ending up outside the West Midlands Police HQ at Lloyd House.

There, several people from the convoy started to gather. Julie said she went over to the group – who were all wearing face masks – to thank them for their support and ask them to disperse. Subsequently, West Midlands Police issued six penalty notices, of £200 each.

The 21 victims of the Birmingham pub bombings

Julie said: ‘My summons talks about “without having a reasonable excuse”, implying I have done something wrong by remembering my sister who was blown up in the biggest unsolved mass murder in criminal history.’

In a letter confirming the intended prosecution, temporary assistant chief constable Chris Todd – an active “anti-racist” and a big supporter of Black Lives Matter – said he was satisfied the action was ‘proportionate and necessary in these circumstances’. He went on: “The matter would be pursued through ‘standard criminal justice proceedings’.”

When Julie and other five relatives eventually appear in court, we expect a massive turnout of support, not just from Brummies but from from Patriots and Loyalists nationwide. We must show West Midlands Police, that they can’t and won’t get away with this persecution of relatives’ families.

It’s more than 46 years now since the IRA blew up the two Birmingham pubs and murdered 21 of our people, yet West Midlands Police are still no closer to arresting, yet alone convicting anyone for the atrocity. The West Midlands Police should hang their heads in shame.

Superspiv Farage now backs Blair!

Former UKIP and Brexit Party leader Nigel Farage once again displayed his lack of principle this week by publicly endorsing Tony Blair as head of a vaccination drive to end the Covid pandemic!

While H&D contributors and readers hold a range of divergent views about the merits of vaccination and the nature of the pandemic, I would guess that we would all agree Tony Blair is just about the last person who should ever be entrusted with political power ever again.

Yet Farage said this week:
“It is time to have a government, and to have people leading it, who’ve got genuine talent even if they disagree on many other policy matters. …Much as I don’t like Tony Blair, he does get things done, he commands respect, he is seriously bright. Why not get people like Tony Blair involved to help us solve a national crisis?”

Brexiteers at war: Farage’s criticisms of the government are rooted in bitter splits within the 2016 referendum campaign – Farage (above left) now prefers Tony Blair to Brexiteers such as Johnson and Dominic Cummings (above right).

The truth is of course that Nigel Farage knows absolutely nothing about Covid or the various medical/scientific issues involved.

The sole reason he is now boosting Blair is his residual resentment against Boris Johnson and Johnson’s former adviser Dominic Cummings. Now that the Brexit issue has (perhaps) been resolved, Farage is looking for another headline and ludicrously hopes he might secure some influence in a Blair-led or Blair-influenced “government of national unity”.

No serious analyst imagines that any such national unity government will happen; if it did, there is next to no chance of Blair leading it; and if by some incredibly remote chance Blair did so, there is zero chance of his rewarding or promoting Farage.

The whole idea is a scam, dreamed up to impress certain weakminded voters who periodically express halfbaked notions about national unity governments.

Only one thing is interesting about this bizarre Farage statement: the fact the this superspiv of British politics seems to have calculated that there is no mileage for him in aligning with lockdown sceptics and anti-vaxxers.

Football fans all over England boo Black Lives Matter “take the knee” nonsense

It seems football fans all over England – not just Millwall as reported by the Main Stream Media (MSM) – were booing the Black Lives Matter ‘taking the knee’ nonsense at football grounds this afternoon. At some grounds in Covid Tier 2 areas, the Government “allowed” up to 2,000 fans to attend games this week.

Most fans had hoped that the saga of the “taking of the knee” to show support for the Communist / Republican organisation Black Lives Matter was over, and they could just get back to watching football again.

However, this was not to be and at most grounds, some misguided players and many officials who should know better, continued with this nonsense.

Understandingly, a lot of fans thought: enough is enough is now. When the players “took the knee” again they booed – and rightly so. They pay good money to watch footballers play football, not support militant political groups.

Of course the MSM went mental, and started to attack Millwall fans, while at the same time trying to cover up what was going on at other grounds.

Those watching the live West Ham United v Manchester United game on Sky Sports (who are big BLM supporters) which kicked off at 5.30pm, were treated to even more booing from West Ham fans!

Well done to all football fans across England (and some in Scotland we understand) who booed: let’s keep it up, they can’t ban us all.

Footnote: Astrophel Sang, aged 19, a BLM supporter from Birmingham, who was filmed using a lighter to try and set the Union flag at the Cenotaph, on fire during the BLM riots in Whitehall in London, on June 7th, before being brought down by the met police and arrested, was spared a jail sentence, and instead got a pitiful fine and community order – you just could not make it up!

Sang, an African immigrant, could have been jailed for up to 18 months. He twice tried to torch the Union flag, after climbing the war memorial during the riot. However, he could not light the flag because it was made to anti-flammable EU standards (well the EU is good for something!). However, he was given a two-year conditional discharge and told to pay £340 in costs.
Compare that to what nationalists might have got for similar crimes. What’s the old saying – one law for them……

Race police force resignation of FA Chairman

Greg Clarke, now ex-chairman of the Football Association

Greg Clarke, chairman of the Football Association, governing body in England for the world’s most popular sport, was forced to resign this week after using a forbidden racial word: not ‘n****r’ or ‘c**n’ or ‘w*g’ or ‘y*d’ – but merely ‘coloured’.

It didn’t help Mr Clarke that the context of this forbidden word was his testimony before a parliamentary committee, where he engaged in typical politically-correct grovelling. When discussing social media “abuse”, Clarke told the committee:

“…if I look at what has happened to high-profile female footballers, high-profile coloured footballers, and the abuse they have taken on social media. It is a free-for-all.

“People can see if you’re black and if they don’t like black people, because they’re filthy racists, they will abuse you anonymously online.

“They can see if you’re a woman, some of the high-profile black, female footballers take terrible abuse, absolutely vile abuse.”

Despite this typical White male self-abasement, the single word ‘coloured’ was picked out, and again despite a further abject apology, Clarke swiftly resigned.

Until about 1980, the word ‘coloured’ was perfectly normal in polite British discourse, but it’s now obligatory to say ‘black’ if one specifically means a negro, or use umbrella terms such as BAME if referring to non-Whites in general.

As with so much political correctness, this revision of vocabulary has come to Britain from the USA, where the term ‘coloured’ was part of the segregation of Whites and Coloureds that ended in the 1960s (although the word survives in its archaic meaning as part of the title of the anti-racist National Association for the Advancement of Coloured People (NAACP) founded in 1907).

‘Mixed race’ has followed ‘half-caste’ into the dustbin of forbidden terms (or perhaps as Mrs Clinton put it the “basket of deplorables”). This is because it’s no longer acceptable even to imply that there is such a thing as race, especially a putative ‘pure’ as opposed to ‘mixed’ race. Meanwhile the ‘N’ word is widely used at street level among ‘African-Americans’ and their co-racialists worldwide, but is among the worst sins imaginable if used by Whites. Other once-common words such as ‘piccaninny’, despite originating among blacks themselves, have long since been banned from White useage.

Many once common terms are now forbidden to Whites

This policing of language is a means of keeping Whites in line, constantly guarding their tongue and apologising for the imagined sins of their ancestors. Yet it’s becoming a dangerous game for the political establishment.

Organisations such as the FA are dependent on government cooperation, and grassroots football in particular depends on taxpayers’ largesse, so has no alternative but to play along with each successive politically correct obsession.

But the wider football-viewing public is increasingly exasperated. In the privacy of the polling booth, many once Labour-voting workers in northern England voted for Brexit (and in December 2019 for the Conservative Party) not solely because of constitutional issues and opposition to the European Union, but in a spirit of resistance to anti-White policies in the field of law and order, education, immigration and even sport.

The Greg Clarke ‘scandal’ proves the futility of attempting to appease ‘anti-racists’ by surrendering to their agenda. Ultimately it proves the futility of liberalism, ‘moderate’ conservatism and civic nationalism. Eventually Whites simply have to draw a line and say they will no longer accept this oppression. Will this resistance crystallise in post-Covid Britain?

Undercover policing of ‘extremists’: will we ever know the truth?

Police battle ‘anti-racist’ demonstrators during the Welling riot of 1993, when it now appears that undercover policemen were operating on both sides.

An official Undercover Policing Inquiry is under way in London, following a series of revelations about the Special Demonstration Squad (SDS), an undercover unit of Metropolitan Police officers that operated against various radical political groups and individuals from 1968 to 2008.

Today’s hearings focused on famous Marxist activist Tariq Ali, born to a wealthy family in what is now Pakistan, but mainly based in England since his student days. Undercover police and MI5 officers monitored Ali going back to 1965 when he was President of the Oxford Union. Most famous for organising protests against the Vietnam War, Ali was one of the leaders of the International Marxist Group (IMG).

In relation to Tariq Ali and other less well-known targets, it has become obvious that the SDS had long-term agents inside militant ‘anti-racist’ and ‘anti-fascist’ groups. For example one heavily-redacted Special Branch document released today gave nine pages of names of anti-NF demonstrators at a march in Southwark, South London, in March 1980.

The Inquiry will later discuss SDS infiltration of anti-BNP groups in the 1990s. Earlier press revelations have included interviews with an officer who infiltrated ‘Youth Against Racism in Europe’, a front for the Trotskyist group Militant Tendency, who held one of several violent protests against the BNP bookshop in Welling, SE London.

Some accounts have suggested that undercover Met officers were present both outside the bookshop among the demonstrators, and inside the bookshop among a small group of nationalists defending the premises.

So far just two such police infiltrators inside the BNP have been named. One used the name Alan ‘Nick’ Nicholson and was supposedly active in BNP circles during 1990 and 1991. The other used the name Darren Prowse and supposedly attempted to join the BNP in 2007 before his mission was aborted.

We expect to hear more as the Inquiry progresses about the SDS role in targeting both the far left and racial nationalists. However the Inquiry is likely to ignore or hush up suggestions that the authorities deliberately stirred up violence between ‘anti-racists’ and the BNP, as well as between nominally radical racial nationalist groups and the BNP during the 1990s.

As the pandemic reaches the White House, what are Covid’s implications for our movement?

H&D correspondent Ian Freeman first wrote of a likely pandemic threat fifteen years ago.

On the day that Covid-19 threatens to transform US politics, we now publish a new article by Ian Freeman in which he offers a nationalist perspective on the crisis.

Click here to read this nationalist perspective on the Covid-19 pandemic.

Next Page »

  • Find By Category

  • Latest News

  • Follow us on Twitter