The advertising industry and 21st century brainwashing

Recently the Russian-based television station RT broadcast a programme about British nationalism, The Patriot Game presented by former MP George Galloway. Amid the usual leftist hysteria there were several minutes from an interview Galloway conducted with veteran racial nationalist Martin Webster.

Mr Webster stood up well to Galloway’s standard line of liberal outrage and moral blackmail, and among the issues he raised was the incessant and insidious propaganda campaign by advertisers to promote multiracialism.

By coincidence in the very same week, an article appeared in the London Review of Books, mainly focused on the over-hyped ‘scandal’ of online campaigning and data analysis by the UK firm Cambridge Analytica during Donald Trump’s 2016 presidential campaign. The relevant sentence from the article was as follows:

New digital advertising billboards at Piccadilly Circus are harvesting data (they contain cameras to analyse the facial expressions of people in the crowds passing by).

This form of intrusive surveillance has obvious commercial attractions, turning Piccadilly Circus into a gigantic ‘focus group’. But is it too paranoid to imagine political / propagandistic implications also?

For example, if advertising billboards were to contain such cameras, it would be possible to compile mountains of data aggregating the responses of the general public to particular depictions of multiracialism. This would reveal public attitudes far more accurately than an opinion poll (where many respondents will give polite or ‘politically correct’ responses on racial questions).

Such data collection would allow propagandists to calibrate their approach more carefully and precisely: to promote multiracialism (or other agendas) in the most effective manner, whether gradual or blatant, according to what proves effective among the covertly surveyed passers-by.

 

Dying UKIP ousts leader

Henry Bolton (left) – ousted UKIP leader – with the party’s only successful chief Nigel Farage

[spacer height=”20px”]On Thursday UKIP lost yet another council seat, today the dying party voted to oust its leader Henry Bolton, who has been brought down by multiple scandals. The vote at an emergency UKIP conference this afternoon went 867-500 against Bolton.

UKIP’s real problem is a combination of poor quality officials and a confused identity.  To what extent is it a nationalist party?  Is it at all racially conscious?  Does it even oppose immigration?  Is it Thatcherite (even ultra-Thatcherite or US-style libertarian) or does it seek to capture some of the spirit and electoral base of the old Labour Party?

None of these questions will be resolved today by the vote to remove Henry Bolton.  In fact Bolton himself may refuse to go quietly, but he is now so discredited that it seems impossible for Nigel Farage and Arron Banks to use him in their longstanding plan to overturn UKIP’s constitution.

Farage and Banks had aimed to reduce the power of UKIP’s National Executive and concentrate power in the leader’s office – what some have unkindly called a BNP-style, führer-principle constitution (though of course without BNP policies)!

David Kurten, likely to be UKIP’s next leader

[spacer height=”20px”]Now the most likely outcome is for UKIP’s rump to select either half-caste London Assembly member David Kurten, or half-Turkish MEP Tim Aker, as the next (perhaps last?) captain of the sinking ship.  Meanwhile Farage and Banks will go off to form a new pressure group (probably not a party) in favour of “Hard Brexit”, while Anne-Marie Waters will continue her chaotic attempt to forge a new party out of UKIP dissidents and ex-EDL types.

Many disillusioned UKIP members have already voted with their feet and wallets, rejoining the Conservative Party where they hope to elect Jacob Rees-Mogg as the next Tory leader, succeeding hopeless Prime Minister Theresa May.  Yet despite his new status as bookies’ favourite, Rees-Mogg is unlikely to make it as far as the members’ ballot, and will probably strike a deal with Boris Johnson or Michael Gove.

Will all this eventually leave political space for revival of a serious racial nationalist party?

UKIP’s death spiral – councillors in mass resignation

Latest UKIP MEP to quit is Tim Aker (above right), seen here campaigning with Nigel Farage in Thurrock, where the entire UKIP group has walked out.

The latest twist in the slow death of UKIP has seen mass resignations in two of the party’s few remaining strongholds. Two MEPs have left the party in the past week, which has led to entire blocs of councillors also quitting.

All seventeen UKIP councillors in the Essex borough of Thurrock (who had been the main opposition to the Tories on the council) resigned yesterday, including Eastern England MEP and former Thurrock parliamentary candidate Tim Aker. They have formed a new group called ‘Thurrock Independents’.

Meanwhile five of the six UKIP councillors in Hartlepool, which had been the party’s only growth area in the 18 months since the Brexit referendum, have also walked out, joined by the MEP for NE England and former UKIP leadership candidate Jonathan Arnott.

Significantly UKIP’s latest leadership crisis – with Henry Bolton refusing to quit despite a no confidence vote by his entire party executive – does not seem to have boosted the breakaway party set up by Anne-Marie Waters, the Islam obsessed runner-up to Bolton in last year’s leadership contest. After their first application was rejected by the Electoral Commission, this new outfit is still not registered as a political party: it now hopes to use the name ‘For Britain Movement’.

Henry Bolton (above left) – the latest catastrophic UKIP leader – with Nigel Farage

Rather than Waters and her ex-EDL associate ‘Tommy Robinson’, the short-term beneficiaries of UKIP’s collapse might be Nigel Farage and his financial backer Arron Banks, though they are likely to build a cross-party movement out of UKIP’s ruins rather than a new party, and it would be focused merely on securing Brexit.

The tragedy is that the broadly nationalist views held by a very large percentage of British voters now have no credible electoral voice. Both UKIP and the BNP have effectively died, and for the time being the only widely-heard spokesmen for any sort of nationalist or even vaguely patriotic politics are cranks or charlatans.

 

UKIP executive decides not to block EDL-linked candidate

Peter Whittle (left), bookies’ favourite to win the UKIP leadership, with former leader Nigel Farage

[spacer height=”20px”]UKIP’s latest leadership election will have eleven candidates after the party’s national executive announced yesterday that they had decided not to block an EDL-linked candidate from standing.

‘Moderates’ on the executive tried to block the leadership campaign of Anne Marie Waters, a former Labour Party member whose campaign team includes ex-BNP member Jack Buckby. Ms Waters is a longstanding ally of Paul Weston (head of Liberty GB) and Stephen Yaxley-Lennon, alias ‘Tommy Robinson’ (founder of the English Defence League, EDL).

Liberal media outrage against Ms Waters (typified by a Nick Cohen column in The Observer) is matched by opposition to her candidature within UKIP, almost all of whose MEPs would quit if she became leader or deputy leader. Mike Hookem, UKIP’s deputy chief whip in the European Parliament whose immediate superior – chief whip Stuart Agnew – is Ms Waters only senior supporter, quit in protest yesterday saying that “turning a blind eye to extremist views” was “not something I am prepared to do”.

H&D readers will remember last year’s fracas involving former leadership favourite Steven Woolfe, which seemed to show that Mr Hookem was more likely to inflict a black eye (if provoked) than turn a blind eye.

Among those condemning Ms Waters is rival leadership candidate Jane Collins, an MEP for Yorkshire & Humber who fought two high-profile parliamentary by-elections for UKIP: Barnsley Central in 2011 and Rotherham in 2012, but Ms Collins is a fringe candidate in a contest that (if you believe the bookies) is now realistically a five-horse race.[spacer height=”20px”]

David Kurten (left) with leadership rival David Coburn MEP

[spacer height=”20px”]A UKIP establishment bandwagon was growing behind David Kurten, a mixed-race UKIP member of the London Assembly, who now has the backing of the Farage-Banks lobby group Leave.EU.  Leave.EU’s backing for Kurten was a blow to Welsh businessman John Rees-Evans, who has organised a nationwide tour to promote his campaign for ‘direct democracy’ to revive UKIP, but apparent ‘homophobic’ comments by Kurten have revived Rees-Evans’s chances.

The field of ‘moderate’ candidates has been further confused by the late entry into the race of Henry Bolton, a military intelligence veteran who stood for Kent Police & Crime Commissioner last year. Bolton is the dark horse in the race, and seems to be picking up support from ‘moderates’ who think that neither Kurten nor Rees-Evans are serious leadership material.

Libertarians disturbed by the anti-Islamist obsessions of Waters and Peter Whittle (described by the Jewish Chronicle as “the Israel-loving friendly face of UKIP” and current favourite to win, after promising to appoint Waters his deputy) are tending to back David Coburn (UKIP’s only Scottish MEP) or Ben Walker (an ex-Tory and councillor for a Bristol suburb), but some will try to pick a ‘non-Islamophobic’ winner from among Kurten, Rees-Evans and Bolton, so as to block the ‘extremists’ Whittle and Waters.

Coburn and Whittle are gay, while Waters is a lesbian. Former leadership candidate Suzanne Evans was thus able to post on Twitter celebrating the fact that “33% of UKIP’s leadership candidates are gay. What other party has ever been able to say that?”

Surprise candidates joining the race but likely to finish as also-rans include Aidan Powlesland, parliamentary candidate for South Suffolk earlier this year, who is an enthusiast for space exploration; David Allen, 2017 parliamentary candidate for Rochester & Strood; and Marion Mason, a former Tory councillor who was UKIP candidate for Hertfordshire Police & Crime Commissioner.

The result of the leadership election will be announced at UKIP’s conference on September 29th in Torquay, after which senior figures such as Nigel Farage and Arron Banks will get on with the serious business of organising a split.

UKIP on verge of split as Islam-obsessed faction attempts takeover

Anne Marie Waters (left) with EDL founder Stephen Yaxley-Lennon (alias Tommy Robinson) and Liberty GB’s Paul Weston, launching a British version of the German anti-Islam movement PEGIDA

 

The dying United Kingdom Independence Party faces an imminent split as hundred of Islam-obsessed EDL supporters have joined the party in recent weeks, supporting the leadership campaign of former Labour Party activist Anne-Marie Waters, who is an ally of EDL founder ‘Tommy Robinson’. Her campaign is reportedly organised by former BNP activist Jack Buckby, who contested last year’s Batley & Spen by-election as candidate of Liberty GB, seen as a political arm of the EDL.

Most prominent figures in UKIP, including former leader Nigel Farage and almost all of the party’s MEPs, have indicated they will resign from the party if Ms Waters becomes leader.  One problem for the UKIP establishment is that the candidate most likely to defeat Ms Waters – former London mayoral candidate Peter Whittle – is almost equally obsessed by a militantly anti-Islam agenda.

There are suggestions that if Mr Whittle wins he will appoint Ms Waters as his deputy, a scenario which would again lead to a serious split.

 

Jack Buckby (left), now running the Anne Marie Waters campaign for UKIP leader, seen here in his earlier political life with fellow Young BNP official Jack Renshaw. Mr Renshaw has taken a different path: he is due to appear at Preston Magistrates Court on July 28th charged with ‘inciting racial hatred’.

 

Earlier this year a breakaway from UKIP was already being planned by Nigel Farage and his main financial backer Arron Banks.  This was to be called the Patriotic Alliance, and would have taken a clearer hard line on immigration than UKIP has previously espoused, though not a narrow and aggressive focus on Islam as advocated by Waters and Whittle: also it would have avoided the complications of UKIP’s democratic constitution, with power very much in the hands of Banks and Farage rather than an elected committee.

However the Banks-Farage plan has been delayed by June’s general election, rapid electoral collapse of UKIP, and growth of the EDL-style faction.

It now looks likely that UKIP could split into at least three segments.  The Waters-Whittle faction obsessed by opposing Islam; a libertarian faction inspired mainly by reducing state intervention and regulation post-Brexit, in pursuit of an extreme American-style version of Thatcherism; and the Banks-Farage group focused mainly on immigration and perhaps open to allowing members with past affiliation to nationalist parties and groups.

Peter Whittle (right) current favourite in the UKIP leadership race, seen here with outgoing leader Paul Nuttall

Nominations for the UKIP leadership election close on July 28th and the winner will be announced at the party’s national conference in Torquay on September 29th, but by then multiple splits will already be unavoidable.

Nigel Farage has already made clear that he will not stand: ‘Farageistes’ are likely to support either Welsh businessman John Rees-Evans, who finished third in the last UKIP contest won by Paul Nuttall last November, or David Coburn the leader of UKIP in Scotland. (Like rival candidates Peter Whittle and Anne-Marie Waters, Mr Coburn is openly homosexual.)

The libertarian faction (some of whom remind H&D of the ‘loony lib’ factions who operated inside the Federation of Conservative Students during the 1980s) are likely to support West Midlands businessman and MEP Bill Etheridge, a former Tory who also serves on Dudley Borough Council.

Bill Etheridge, leader of UKIP’s libertarian faction, with former fiancée Lorraine Chew

Some of the party mainstream who have personal objections to Mr Etheridge are likely to support Ben Walker, a councillor from the Bristol suburb of Bradley Stoke and another ex-Tory; or they might be tempted to burnish the party’s ‘non-racist’ credentials by electing UKIP’s first mixed race leader, London Assembly member David Kurten.

And as mentioned earlier, the increasing numbers of Islam-obsessed members will back one of the two current favourites, Peter Whittle or Anne Marie Waters.

Whoever wins, UKIP seems set on an irreversible course to make the BNP look credible!

BNP and other nationalist votes

Pendle BNP councillor and county council candidate Brian Parker

Pendle BNP councillor and parliamentary candidate Brian Parker

An extraordinary General Election that wiped out Theresa May’s Conservative majority also saw the electoral eclipse of the BNP and the English Democrats, none of whose candidates even came close to saving their deposits.

Brian Parker – the BNP’s sole remaining borough councillor – polled only 718 votes (1.6%) in Pendle, his party’s main target seat.

BNP chairman Adam Walker managed a slightly better result in Bishop Auckland, but was bottom of the poll with 991 votes (2.3%).

Meanwhile the English Democrats’ results were even worse, collapsing from an already low base. As the SNP lost support north of the border it appears that the Union is safe, and logically ‘English’ nationalism has lost relevance.[spacer height=”20px”]

BNP results

Bexleyheath & Crayford
Peter Finch 0.6%

Bishop Auckland
Adam Walker 2.3%

Charnwood
Stephen Denham 0.6% (-0.4)

Dagenham & Rainham
Paul Sturdy 0.5% (+0.2)

Eltham
John Clarke 1.6%

Hornchurch & Upminster
David Furness 0.7% (+0.3)

Maldon [listed as ‘Fighting Unsustainable Housing’: BNP name not on ballot]
Richard Perry 0.5%

Old Bexley & Sidcup
Michael Jones 0.7% (+0.2)

Pendle
Brian Parker 1.6%

South Basildon & East Thurrock
Paul Borg 0.8%

——–

English Democrat candidates

Barnsley Central
Stephen Morris 0.5% (-0.8)

Barnsley East
Kevin Riddiough 0.7% (-0.4)

Bradford South
Thérèse Hirst 0.9%

Clacton
Robin Tilbrook 0.7%

Doncaster North
David Allen 0.9% (-0.3)

Holborn & St Pancras
Janus Polenceus 0.2%

NE Cambridgeshire
Stephen Goldspink 0.5%

[spacer height=”20px”]

Paul Nuttall (left) has succeeded Nigel Farage as UKIP leader following a period of internal turmoil. He claims that UKIP will serious challenge Labour in Northern England.

Paul Nuttall (left) succeeded Nigel Farage last year as UKIP leader following a period of internal turmoil. He resigned today after electoral humiliation,

Meanwhile those racial nationalists who believed that UKIP offered us some hope must think again after the party suffered a series of crushing defeats, ending with the resignation of humiliated leader Paul Nuttall.

Notable UKIP disasters included Clacton (formerly their sole parliamentary seat until Douglas Carswell’s resignation) where UKIP’s vote fell from 44.4% to 7.6%; Thanet South (where re-elected Conservative MP Craig Mackinlay still faces criminal charges for fraudulent overspending during his defeat of Nigel Farage in 2015) – UKIP vote down from 32.4% to 6.0%; and Boston & Skegness, a key target seat contested by Nuttall himself – UKIP vote down from 33.8% to 7.7%.

The only vaguely credible UKIP result came in Thurrock, where UKIP’s Tim Aker (an MEP from a part-Turkish background) fought a vigorous campaign against pro-Remain Tory MP Jackie Doyle-Price.  However even here the UKIP vote fell from 31.7% to 20.1%. Ms Doyle-Price survived, and Labour pushed UKIP into third place.

 

Arron Banks announces plans for post-UKIP movement

Arron Banks

Arron Banks says that UKIP has dispatched itself with “a strategic bullet to the back of the head”.

Following this week’s catastrophic election results which signalled the death of UKIP, the party’s former chief donor Arron Banks has issued a statement condemning new leader Paul Nuttall and confirming plans to launch “a new movement with radical policies and direct democracy”.

According to Banks this will “launch in the autumn after the General Election, once the electoral map has been redrawn”.

A close ally of ex-UKIP leader Nigel Farage, Banks contrasted the successes of the Farage era with the shambles that UKIP has become:

“If we use the analogy of UKIP as a racing car, Nigel was a skilled driver who drove the car around the track faster and faster, knowing when to take risks, delighting the audience.

“The current leadership has crashed the car, at the first bend of the race, into the crowd, killing the driver and spectators.

“As one of the Leave.EU team said to me: a strategic bullet to the back of the head.

“It’s a sorry state of affairs.”

Click here to read H&D‘s report on this week’s local elections.

Both here and in the journal Heritage and Destiny, we will continue to bring you updated news of the general election campaign as it affects racial nationalist parties and the broader movement.

 

UKIP chaos as new leader quits

Diane James (right) has quit after just 18 days as UKIP leader

Diane James (right) has quit after just 18 days as UKIP leader

Just 18 days after being elected to succeed Nigel Farage as leader of UKIP, Diane James has quit – forcing a new leadership election which will further demonstrate her party’s chaotic factionalism and ideological incoherence.

As suggested in the current edition of Heritage and Destiny, one of the party’s main problems is the insistence of the Farage faction (including Ms James) on increasing the power of the leader and subverting UKIP’s constitution. Behind the scenes major donors are already plotting a new breakaway party.

Farage infamously denounced his own party’s officials within days of stepping down as leader, telling an interviewer: “the barrier to radical change and the modernisation of UKIP was implanted in the mid-1990s.  It is called the National Executive Committee.  Many of its current crop are among the lowest grade of people I have ever met.”

Similarly Diane James, in her resignation statement emailed to The Times this eveningwrote: “It has become clear I do not have sufficient authority, nor the full support of MEP colleagues and party officers to implement the changes I believe are necessary and upon which I based my campaign.”

Steven Woolfe - again favourite to win the new UKIP leadership contest

Steven Woolfe – again favourite to win the new UKIP leadership contest

Amazingly, Ms James seems to have thought that political leadership was like applying for a job in the middle-class world (which is all she understands) – where if accepted or headhunted, one then negotiates mutually acceptable terms. Or else she imagined that being elected leader entitled her to impose a Führerprinzip, by which her personal fiat could overrule the party’s internal democracy.

For the benefit of future UKIP leadership candidates – including the mixed-race (and therefore inevitably bookies’ favourite for the job) Steven Woolfe, who failed to hand in his nomination papers on time during the last contest, then expected the rules to be bent for his convenience – we had better restate what should be obvious.

If you stand for the leadership of a political party, you are accepting that party’s rulebook. If you later wish to change that rulebook, then you do it in a constitutional manner. And if you aim to inspire the confidence of the British people, it’s not a good start to mistrust your own party membership.

Suzanne Evans, leading enemy of Farage and likely leadership candidate for UKIP's most liberal faction

Suzanne Evans, leading enemy of Farage and likely leadership candidate for UKIP’s most liberal faction

For too long UKIP has tried to avoid all the issues that matter. When in the North, pretending to support the welfare state, while promising tax cuts and privatisation to middle-class ex-Tories in the South. Giving the populist impression of being anti-immigration, while acknowledging in the European Parliament that they favour immigration (in the interests of big business).

UKIP won its main battle at the Brexit referendum earlier this year. The leadership farce shows that it is not a fit vehicle for any form of nationalist politics. UKIP’s collapse is well under way: it cannot come soon enough.

NF’s Richard Edmonds to contest Batley by-election

Richard Edmonds, NF candidate at the Batley & Spen by-election

Richard Edmonds, NF candidate at the Batley & Spen by-election

Richard Edmonds of the National Front will contest the parliamentary by-election in the West Yorkshire constituency of Batley & Spen.  Polling day is October 20th.

Mr Edmonds began his involvement in British nationalism following an impressive NF result at another famous by-election, at Uxbridge in 1972 where the NF polled 8.7%, convincing many patriots (including Richard) that they represented a serious alternative to our corrupt and treacherous political establishment.

Some years earlier Richard graduated with a first class honours degree in Electronic Engineering. After working as a schoolteacher and later with the telecommunications company Cable & Wireless, he devoted a large part of his life to nationalist politics, including most of the 1990s as proprietor of a nationalist bookshop and party headquarters in Welling.  He achieved the best racial nationalist result of the 1992 General Election, polling 3.6% in Bethnal Green & Stepney.

During the early 2000s Richard returned to teaching for a few years, before rejoining the struggle to reclaim Britain for the British, as a National Front activist.

Launching his campaign earlier today, Richard Edmonds pointed out that “one quarter of all the births in this country are to mothers themselves born overseas, …it is time and it is legitimate to put the interests of our people first.

“It is time for a British voice to speak up loud and clear: Put the British people First. That British voice is the voice of the National Front.”

Click here for further information about the National Front and Richard’s campaign.

 

‘Anti-racist’ councillor in fraud probe

Scandal-hit councillor and Hope not Hate organiser Sam Tarry (right) with his HnH boss Nick Lowles.

Scandal-hit councillor and Hope not Hate organiser Sam Tarry (right) with his HnH boss Nick Lowles.

It’s been a tough summer for Britain’s anti-racists.  First Searchlight had its website sabotaged; then its editor’s former partner in crime Manny Carpel was jailed for drug trafficking; then Hope not Hate‘s funding from George Soros foundations was exposed in a massive data leak.

Now another disaster for ‘anti-fascism’.  Transport union official Sam Tarry was campaign organiser for Hope not Hate in Barking & Dagenham, once the BNP’s flagship borough, where Tarry no doubt believes he played an important role in turning back the fascist tide.

In fact that had already been achieved by the BNP leader himself, scuttling his own party, but at least Sam Tarry managed to get a seat for himself as a Labour councillor in Barking, where he has received £20,000 in council allowances.

Sadly this meteoric political rise might be about to end in yet another crash and burn.  The main headline in today’s Sunday Times exposes an “electoral fraud row” involving Cllr Tarry.

In order to stand for Barking & Dagenham council, he had to be registered as living at an address in the borough (or work there).  Yet according to the Sunday Times he actually lives 70 miles away in Brighton.

Tarry is presently director of Jeremy Corbyn’s leadership campaign.

As the Sunday Times points out:

Councillors are required by law to live or work in the borough they represent and must sign an official declaration to that effect.  Making a false declaration is punishable by up to six months in prison.  Making a false registration to vote carries a penalty of up to 51 weeks in jail.

Richard Smalley, formerly a Tory member of Derby city council, was last week sentenced to two months in jail for claiming he lived in Derby while living outside the city.

Note: The original story is behind a Times paywall so the full report can only be seen by subscribers.  However a later version of the story can also be seen on the Telegraph website.

Tarry has denied the allegations, and his lawyers suggest that “any suggestion of criminality or breach of election law is defamatory and inaccurate”.

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