Honouring the Fallen

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For almost a century – since the first Armistice Day in November 1919 – Britons have paid tribute at this time of year to those of our race who died in the catastrophic wars of the twentieth century, and now the further disastrous conflicts of the twenty-first.

This year, for the first time, our remembrance is accompanied not merely by despair at the continuing folly and treachery of our political leaders, but by genuine hope of national, cultural and racial renaissance.

So this year the famous words inscribed on war memorials across our land (originally at the imperial war cemetery in Kohima) have a special resonance:

When you go home, tell them of us and say
For their tomorrow, we gave our today.

For the first time, that tomorrow holds out the promise not of continued degradation, not of further pointless sacrifice, but of a bright new dawn for the White world.

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We will remember them

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97 years ago today, on 11th November 1918, the great European holocaust ended after four years of slaughter.

Our country, our continent and our race remains scarred forever by that terrible European civil war – a scar that was to be reopened by another disastrous conflict just twenty-one years later.

Britain’s armed services have had to face further sacrifices still, though none has yet matched the scale of the cataclysm that we mark today.

Almost worse than the death and destruction has been the repeated betrayal – the latest example being the sickening decision yesterday to arrest a 66-year-old former Lance-Corporal from the Parachute Regiment.

Though we must never despair, we must always remember: the sacrifice, the lies, the betrayal.  Soon true justice will be meted out: the British, European and White peoples of the world will reclaim their birthright.

We remember the words of Cicero – the greatest orator of another mighty empire two millennia ago – who wrote that “to be ignorant of what occurred before you were born is to remain always a child.  For what is the worth of human life, unless it is woven into the life of our ancestors by the records of history?”

And we remember the words that have been spoken at war memorials across our nation for almost a century:

They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old:
Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn.
At the going down of the sun and in the morning
We will remember them.

Is the Falklands more British than the UK?

This week’s overwhelming vote by residents of the Falkland Islands to remain subjects of the British Crown – with only 3 votes against and 1,513 in favour – has led some observers (including the BBC) to ask the dangerous question: is the Falklands now more British than the mainland “mother country”.

Falklanders celebrating in Port Stanley after the emphatic pro-British vote

Its population certainly more closely resembles Britain as it used to be: i.e. White.

The same is mostly true of British expatriates around the world: more than 200,000 in South Africa and New Zealand; more than 600,000 in the USA and Canada; 1.3 million in Australia; and more than 750,000 in Spain.

In the case of many expatriates the changing nature of their native country was a major reason for choosing to leave it, and their identity is not with today’s Britain, but with the once and (we hope) future Britain.

Meanwhile the Falklanders (and the inhabitants of other sometimes embattled remnants of empire such as St Helena and Gibraltar) hold fast to a strongly British identity as a symbol of defiance against those who would sell them out – in the case of the Falklands, to their intermittently aggressive neighbour Argentina.

Anti-British protestors in the Argentine capital burn an effigy of Prince William outside the British Embassy.

London’s dispute with Argentina, which led to a brief military conflict in 1982, has flared up again during the last year, and might take another turn with the election of an Argentine Pope – the former Archibishop of Buenos Aires, Cardinal Jorge Bergoglio, who has become Pope Francis I.

Last year he told a congregation in the Argentine capital at a memorial service for the 1982 war:
“We come to pray for those who have fallen, sons of the homeland who set out to defend his mother, the homeland, to claim the country that is theirs and they were usurped.”

The new Pope Francis I – then Cardinal Bergoglio of Buenos Aires – seen last year with Argentina’s President Cristina Kirchner, who has reignited the Falklands controversy and now suggests the Pope might mediate with London.

One might expect him to take a more diplomatic line now that he has become Pope. Some commentators have suggested that the Falklands controversy might delay a papal visit to the UK, but even in the immediate aftermath of the 1982 war memories were short. Argentina and Tottenham Hotspur football star Osvaldo Ardiles was sent on a diplomatic season’s loan to Paris St Germain in 1982-3, but soon returned to the London club for the 1983-4 season and remained for five years, even coming back as manager in 1993.  Ardiles and his fellow Argentine Spurs star Ricky Villa were inducted into the Tottenham Hotspur Hall of Fame in 2008.

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