German election campaign livens up with frontrunner Merkel under pressure

Martin Schulz (left) failed to achieve the debate victory he needed to revive the SPD’s challenge to German Chancellor Angela Merkel (right)

German Chancellor Angela Merkel remains a strong favourite to secure re-election when her fellow countrymen go to the polls on 24th September.  In 2015 Merkel’s decision to admit well over a million asylum seekers seemed to be not only a catastrophe for Germans but a political disaster for Merkel herself. Her conservative CDU-CSU [the CDU operates in most of Germany but has a longstanding partnership with the Catholic CSU in Bavaria] was losing votes to a new anti-immigration party Alternative for Germany (AfD) throughout late 2015 and 2016.

Then at the start of this year the SPD (German equivalent of the Labour Party) started to take a lead in opinion polls after selecting former European Parliament president Martin Schulz as its candidate for Chancellor.

However once the campaign got under way many voters, especially in the more prosperous western areas of Germany, began to turn back to Merkel partly out of fear that the SPD would form a coalition government including the neo-Marxist Left Party (Die Linke) as well as the Greens.  The Left Party includes former leaders of the Communist Party that ruled the former East Germany until the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989.

A further complication is that former SPD Chancellor Gerhard Schröder has taken a position on the board of the Russian state oil company Rosneft, raising suspicions among journalists hostile to Putin.

The TV debate on September 3rd between Merkel and Schulz was seen as the socialist opposition’s last chance to revive their campaign.

However Schulz failed to make significant progress in the debate and seems headed for certain defeat.

Frauke Petry, co-leader of the anti-immigration Alternative for Germany, decided earlier this year not to be AfD’s candidate for Chancellor

Meanwhile AfD has suffered internal strains, with co-leader Frauke Petry deciding not to be the party’s candidate for Chancellor.

In recent days Merkel has tried to take her campaign to eastern areas that remain hostile to her immigration policy.  The Financial Times this weekend describes a disastrous Merkel campaign event in Bitterfeld, an industrial town in Lower Saxony where AfD remains strong.  Some predict that while AfD’s nationwide vote will be under 10%, it could poll closer to 20% in the East (outside the capital Berlin which remains a leftist stronghold).

AfD has not resolved internal debates over how to deal with present-day Germany’s tyrannical laws that dictate not only what can be said on racial matters, but how scientists, historians, lawyers and ordinary citizens can discuss issues of 20th century history.

Germany’s main nationalist party the NPD will be fielding candidates in most of the country both at constituency and list level. (The German election system is partly based on Westminster style constituencies but with a ‘top-up’ element based on party lists, to create a Parliament that represents the percentage votes achieved by each party, with a 5% threshold required to obtain any MPs.)

Ursula Haverbeck in discussion with her lawyer Wolfram Nahrath during court proceedings in November 2016

Recently the 88-year-old Ursula Haverbeck was given a two-year sentence for ‘Holocaust denial’ after questioning the increasingly discredited official version of history that dictates 6 million Jews were murdered, supposedly mainly in homicidal gas chambers during the Second World War.

German prosecutors and government representatives refuse to answer Frau Haverbeck’s questions as to how, where and on whose orders such supposed mass killings took place: instead of answering such questions they bring further criminal charges. However contrary to some reports Frau Haverbeck is not presently in a prison cell, as despite court verdicts and sentences there are still appeal processes going on.

Meanwhile the 81-year-old lawyer Horst Mahler remains imprisoned near Berlin on similar charges, having been handed back to German custody in June by the Hungarian government. Mahler had been released from a 12-year prison sentence on health grounds after becoming critically ill and having a leg amputated, but prosecutors ordered his return to prison earlier this year.

Election success for German anti-immigration party

Frauke Petry, leader of Alternative for Germany, which achieved tremendous gains in German elections yesterday.

Frauke Petry, leader of Alternative for Germany, which achieved tremendous gains in German elections yesterday.

The anti-immigration party “Alternative for Germany” (Alternative für Deutschland – AfD) has made worldwide headlines this week after yesterday’s elections to three German state parliaments (Landtag) in which AfD finished in second or third place.

AfD was only formed in 2013 and until last summer was mainly focused on reform of the European Union and the single currency: effectively a milder version of our UKIP. In the European Parliament its members were in the same transnational group as David Cameron’s Conservatives and the Polish governing party Law & Justice. They have now been expelled from this group and will probably ally with the Austrian Freedom Party and Marine Le Pen’s French National Front.

AfD was transformed into a more radical anti-immigration force less than a year ago under a new leader – Frauke Petry – and is now seen as the main voice for Germans disgusted by the liberal immigration policy of their Chancellor Angela Merkel.

Mrs Merkel’s Conservative CDU and its traditional opposition the SPD (similar to our Labour Party) were the big losers in yesterday’s elections, and the anti-immigration AfD were the big winners, fighting all three states for the first time.

The most dramatic result was in the former East German state of Saxony-Anhalt, where AfD finished second with 24.2% and will now be the main opposition to an unprincipled coalition of conservatives, socialists and greens who will attempt to govern the region. The nationalist NPD (which is fighting a court case against an attempted ban by German authorities) polled 1.9% (down from 4.6% last time) and a new nationalist party called Die Rechte (The Right) polled 0.2%.

AfD finished third in the traditionally prosperous and conservative western German state of Baden-Württemberg, polling 15.1%. The NPD (for whom this was never a stronghold) slipped from 1.0% to 0.4% and another nationalist party, the Republikaner (who held seats in Baden-Württemberg from 1992 to 2001) similarly fell from 1.1% to 0.3%.

In another western German state – Rhineland Palatinate – the AfD again finished third with 12.6%, while the NPD and Republikaner polled 0.5% (down from 1.1%) and 0.2% (down from 0.8%).

The immigration crisis and the rise of AfD inspired large numbers of Germans to take part in these elections: turnout was 61.1% in Saxony Anhalt and 70.4% in Baden-Württemberg and Rhineland Palatinate.

We can now expect AfD (despite the levels of support achieved in these elections) to be intensively targeted by Germany’s heavily politicised security agencies, who will support efforts by establishment politicians to intimidate anti-immigration campaigners.

Nationalist event survives attempted government ban

Jared Taylor of American Renaissance and Dr Tom Sunic, philosopher and former Croatian diplomat, addressed a private dinner of 76 European nationalists in Budapest following the banning of the European Congress (see earlier report).

The Hungarian government’s attempt to silence discussion of racial realities confronting Europeans worldwide has backfired, with extensive media coverage of Jared Taylor’s successful rescuing of the event and his message to attendees, who had flown to Budapest from many countries sharing a common European heritage now under threat from multiracial mania.

BBC News has posted a long report by their correspondent in Budapest.

On the American Renaissance website, there is a full account of the last week’s dramatic events in Budapest – and the text of Jared Taylor’s address to Saturday evening’s dinner.

Tom Sunic’s after dinner speech (introduced by Jared Taylor) can be viewed below:

 

Narrow defeat for German nationalists

The NPD – Germany’s main nationalist party – suffered a narrow defeat this weekend in elections for the regional parliament of Saxony.  At the last elections five years ago the NPD polled 5.6%, winning eight seats.  This year their vote fell by a fraction to 4.95%, very slightly below the required 5% threshold, so there will be no NPD members in the new Landtag.

The main reason for this defeat was the arrival on the German political scene of a new eurosceptic partyAlternative für Deutschland (AFD) – which is effectively a more liberal version of UKIP.  AFD won 9.7% and will have fourteen seats in the new Saxony Landtag, their first success in any of the German regional parliaments.

AFD is seen as a respectable protest vote by millions of German voters who (like many of their fellow Europeans) despair of the establishment parties.  To this extent their electoral breakthrough (like that of UKIP) is a positive development.

Sadly however one consequence has been to deprive genuine nationalists of a parliamentary voice.  Unlike the NPD, AFD is mostly pro-immigration and pro-EU, though hostile to the euro.

The biggest losers in the Saxony election were the FDP – Germany’s liberal party and traditional coalition partners of the ruling conservatives.  The FDP lost all of their Landtag seats after their vote collapsed from 10.0% to 3.8%.

Labour leader in row over immigration policy

Labour’s former immigration minister Barbara Roche hits out at her party leader’s planned policy changes.

Opinion polls suggest that by 2015 Ed Miliband will be Prime Minister.  But in his anxiety to reassure voters that he understands their concerns about immigration, Miliband has sparked a row with Labour’s former immigration minister.

In an article for the Independent on Sunday on 20th January 2013, Barbara Roche – who was immigration minister in Tony Blair’s government from 1999 to 2001 – complains that “over the past few months there has been a concerted attack, from across the political spectrum, on the last Labour Government’s record on immigration.”

Mrs Roche – formerly Barbara Margolis – enjoyed a high flying career from her days as head girl of the Jews Free School in Camden (the largest Jewish school in Europe), via Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford, and several years as a Middle Temple barrister.  Elected as MP for the multi-ethnic Hornsey & Wood Green in 1992, she lost her seat in 2005 – seen as a political casualty of Tony Blair’s Iraq war, which she had strongly supported but which was opposed by many of her constituents, not least Muslim voters.

In her IoS article Mrs Roche points out that during her time as a minister there was a panic over asylum seekers, but no real debate over immigration policy (as opposed to asylum).  She argues that the assumption behind the 1971 Immigration Act – seeking to end “primary” immigration of the sort that had taken place on a large scale since the arrival of West Indian immigrants aboard the Empire Windrush in 1948 – was wrong.  According to Mrs Roche, “legal migration is, in an age of globalisation, an economic, social and cultural good.”

Mrs Roche’s article was provoked by Ed Miliband’s BBC interview a few days earlier, the latest of a series in which the Labour leader indicated that the Blair and Brown governments had made mistakes in underestimating the scale of Eastern European immigration, and failing to understand immigration’s impact on White working class Britons.

In a speech to the Fabian Society on 12th January, Miliband had gone even further:
“High levels of migration were having huge effects on the lives of people in our country. And too often those in power seemed not to accept this. The fact that they didn’t explains partly why people turned against us in the last general election. So we must work to ensure that it never happens again.”

Needless to say, Labour has no intention of adopting a genuinely sane immigration policy.  The internal dispute is over to what extent they should openly and proudly celebrate immigration (as Mrs Roche argues), or whether they should offer at least a pretence of caring about the White working class (as Mr Miliband seems to prefer).

Biggest ever rise in UK population

An official UK Census form sorter in 2001 - no we are not joking!

An official UK Census form sorter in 2001 - no we are not joking!

The first results of last’s years UK Census prove that our population during the past decade saw the biggest jump in recorded history.  The surge is largely due to the immigration boom, in what was already an overcrowded country.  Another factor is the high birth rate among non-European immigrant groups.

England and Wales saw a 7.1% rise in population, from 52.4 million in 2001 to 56.1 million in 2011.  Needless to say these figures do not include unknown numbers of illegal immigrants.  Population density in London is now 5,200 per square kilometre – ranking alongside Madrid and Athens as the most densely populated cities in Europe.

Moreover in the next fifteen years, official projections show that two thirds of the next population increase will come from immigrants: an extra 5 million people, equivalent to the combined populations of Birmingham, Leeds, Glasgow, Sheffield, Bradford, Manchester, Liverpool and Bristol.

No 2011 statistics have yet been published about racial or religious matters.  Click here for the latest official UK Census updates.

Oxford study reveals Labour’s immigration surge

how to come to UKA new study by Oxford University’s Migration Observatory shows that the New Labour governments of Tony Blair and Gordon Brown presided over an immigration boom greater than any other major country except Italy.  (There’s an obvious reason for Italy being the first port of call, as it geographically closest to North Africa and the Balkans – but by the same logic the United Kingdom ought to be the very last port of call!)

In 1993 there were 3.8 million foreign-born people in the U.K., which was 7% of our population.  By 2010 this had risen to almost 7 million, an astonishing 12% of the population.

In other words there was a 22% rise in our migrant population, way ahead of neighbouring countries such as France, who experienced only a 3.4% rise.

The England First Party asks why successive U.K. governments have allowed this immigration surge?  English voters simply cannot trust the Labour, Conservative and Liberal Democrat politicians who have transformed our country without considering the views of the indigenous population.

Click here to read the Oxford report on the immigration boom.

Immigration scandal continues

UKBorderAgencyIt was one of the worst scandals of the New Labour years: in 2006 Charles Clarke was sacked as Home Secretary after admitting that more than 1,000 foreign criminals in British jails had been released at the end of their prison sentences rather than being assessed for deportation.

Yet now in 2012 – two years into the Conservative – Liberal Democrat coalition that promised to remedy these New Labour abuses – we find that this scandal has not been remedied.

The House of Commons Home Affairs Committee has today reported that of these 1,013 immigrant criminals, only 397 have been removed from our shores.  57 have proved impossible to trace and – most shocking of all – the remaining 559 have been allowed to remain in this country, either indefinitely or while their cases continue to be looked into!

The problem goes well beyond these thousand or so criminals from 2006.  Of more recent cases, only around two thirds of foreign prisoners released in 2011 have been deported, and there are another 2,670 dating back more than two years who have not yet been removed because they are still appealing. Around 120,000 immigration cases, according to the committee, have been written off because those involved can no longer be traced.  The asylum backlog still contains a further 20,000 unresolved cases.

Britain's failed Home Secretary Theresa May

Britain's failed Home Secretary Theresa May

As the parliamentary committee’s chairman concludes: “The reputation of the Home Office, and by extension, the UK Government, is being tarnished by the inability of the UK Border Agency (UKBA) to fulfil its basic functions. The foreign national prisoner issue and the asylum backlog were scandals which first broke in 2006, six years ago. UKBA appears unable to focus on its key task of tracking and removing illegal immigrants, overstayers or bogus students from the country.”

The England First Party would make a more fundamental criticism: the entire immigration racket should have been terminated long ago.  Our country has become a soft touch for any crook or scrounger who manages to cross the border.

12,000 more Indian immigrants on the way

New Delhi today, Newcastle tomorrow?  12,000 Indian workers are heading for England

New Delhi today, Newcastle tomorrow? 12,000 Indian workers are heading for England

A secret instruction from the European Union will force thousands more Indian immigrants onto England’s already overcrowded job market.

As part of a trade deal with India negotiated by former EU Commissioner Peter Mandelson, Europe must absorb 40,000 Indian workers – of which a minimum of 12,000 will be heading to the UK.  Unsurprisingly we are expected to take 30% of the total, despite representing only 12% of the EU.

Cynically, the workers will arrive under a theoretical six-month limit, which means they will pay no UK tax or national insurance, and will not appear on the official immigration figures.  However no checks are in place to ensure that they go back to India when the six months are up!

Former British ambassador Sir Andrew Green commented that the arrangements:
“are quite clearly against the interests of British workers at a time of very high unemployment.  That, presumably, is why the government has been keeping quiet about them.

“The six month limit, though completely unenforceable, keeps them out of the official immigration figures.  However, in practice, this agreement, if signed, would open the door for thousands of new migrants.

“Of particular concern is our IT workforce – already being undercut by Indian IT companies – which will be put under further pressure.”

Cameron junks immigration promise

A new treaty is set to guarantee unlimited Indian immigration into Britain

A new treaty is set to guarantee unlimited Indian immigration into Britain

Long suffering British voters are used to politicians ditching their immigration promises – but Conservative Prime Minister David Cameron is setting a new record by breaking his word less than six months after taking office!

Speaking to business leaders at the CBI this week Cameron assured his audience that “we will not impede you from attracting the best talent from around the world”, regardless of his party’s election pledge to impose a cap on immigration. His spokesman later underlined this policy reversal: “We will be looking at the level of that [immigration] cap and at the way in which it operates and making sure that works in a way that allows business to bring the people that they need into the UK.” In other words the immigration cap will be meaningless.

British dole queues set to lengthen as immigration limits set aside

British dole queues set to lengthen as immigration soars

Moreover according to a new report by Migrationwatch UK, the EU/India Free Trade Agreement due to be signed in a few weeks time will prevent Britain from restricting immigration from India, since it explicitly allows Indian companies to transfer any number of employees from India to EU countries including the UK.

The prospective immigrant needs only to have worked for 12 months in India for the company concerned, and he/she can then be transferred to the UK with no questions asked. There is no need for the company to show that suitable British workers could not be recruited for the vacancy. There is no limit to the number of such immigrants who can use this loophole.

Sir Andrew Green of Migrationwatch commented:
It is time the government came clean about what is in this agreement. It looks as though the Indians are about to drive a bullock and cart through Britain’s immigration system despite government talk about creating jobs in the private sector. There is no point in a limit on economic migration if specialists from India are excluded from the cap by a separate agreement. British IT workers are already suffering the impact on jobs of tens of thousands of Indian IT staff working in Britain; we already have 48,000 unemployed British IT specialists.

Next Page »

  • Find By Category

  • Latest News

  • Follow us on Twitter