Happy St George’s Day!

Heritage and Destiny wishes all readers a Happy St George’s Day!

The men that worked for England
They have their graves at home:
And birds and bees of England
About the cross can roam

But they that fought for England,
Following a falling star,
Alas, alas for England
They have their graves afar.

And they that rule in England,
In stately conclave met,
Alas, alas for England
They have no graves as yet.

Is the Falklands more British than the UK?

This week’s overwhelming vote by residents of the Falkland Islands to remain subjects of the British Crown – with only 3 votes against and 1,513 in favour – has led some observers (including the BBC) to ask the dangerous question: is the Falklands now more British than the mainland “mother country”.

Falklanders celebrating in Port Stanley after the emphatic pro-British vote

Its population certainly more closely resembles Britain as it used to be: i.e. White.

The same is mostly true of British expatriates around the world: more than 200,000 in South Africa and New Zealand; more than 600,000 in the USA and Canada; 1.3 million in Australia; and more than 750,000 in Spain.

In the case of many expatriates the changing nature of their native country was a major reason for choosing to leave it, and their identity is not with today’s Britain, but with the once and (we hope) future Britain.

Meanwhile the Falklanders (and the inhabitants of other sometimes embattled remnants of empire such as St Helena and Gibraltar) hold fast to a strongly British identity as a symbol of defiance against those who would sell them out – in the case of the Falklands, to their intermittently aggressive neighbour Argentina.

Anti-British protestors in the Argentine capital burn an effigy of Prince William outside the British Embassy.

London’s dispute with Argentina, which led to a brief military conflict in 1982, has flared up again during the last year, and might take another turn with the election of an Argentine Pope – the former Archibishop of Buenos Aires, Cardinal Jorge Bergoglio, who has become Pope Francis I.

Last year he told a congregation in the Argentine capital at a memorial service for the 1982 war:
“We come to pray for those who have fallen, sons of the homeland who set out to defend his mother, the homeland, to claim the country that is theirs and they were usurped.”

The new Pope Francis I – then Cardinal Bergoglio of Buenos Aires – seen last year with Argentina’s President Cristina Kirchner, who has reignited the Falklands controversy and now suggests the Pope might mediate with London.

One might expect him to take a more diplomatic line now that he has become Pope. Some commentators have suggested that the Falklands controversy might delay a papal visit to the UK, but even in the immediate aftermath of the 1982 war memories were short. Argentina and Tottenham Hotspur football star Osvaldo Ardiles was sent on a diplomatic season’s loan to Paris St Germain in 1982-3, but soon returned to the London club for the 1983-4 season and remained for five years, even coming back as manager in 1993.  Ardiles and his fellow Argentine Spurs star Ricky Villa were inducted into the Tottenham Hotspur Hall of Fame in 2008.

Happy St George’s Day

st_george_oneEngland First chairman Mark Cotterill wishes all members and supporters a happy St. George’s Day.

Mark said, “I hope all nationalist activists will take an hour or two off today from their hectic election campaigns, to raise a glass to our patron Saint – St. George. I wish all racial-nationalist candidates, from whatever political party all the very best for May 3rd. Lets make sure you give them your full support and get the best possible vote in these difficult times.”

‘Cry God for England, Harry and St George!’ Those immortal words are from Shakespeare’s Henry V, but who was St George and how did he become patron saint of England?

St George was a Roman soldier who lived in the 3rd century AD. At the end of the century the Emperor Diocletian persecuted Christians and St George was martyred in 303 AD.

burnley_st_georges_steven2The cult of St George was brought to England from the Middle East by the crusaders. (St George was popular with the crusaders because he was a soldier). He is supposed to have appeared to them at Antioch in 1098.

St Georges Day, 23 April was set by the synod of Oxford in 1222. Meanwhile he was growing in popularity in England. By the 14th century St George was seen as England’s saint, rather than St. Edmund.

(St. Edmund was the King of East Anglia from 855 until 869, when his English army was defeated by the invading Danish forces known as the Great Heathen Army.  Edmund refused to renounce his Christian faith and was beheaded on the orders of the Danish commander.  A decade later the Danes were defeated by Alfred the Great.  St. Edmund’s body was preserved and later transferred to a market town in Suffolk which became Bury St Edmunds, a shrine which became the centre of a popular Christian cult.)

In the Middle Ages some people formed religious guilds. They prayed for dead members’ souls and provided charity. Many were dedicated to St George. On St George’s day in many places effigies of St George were taken out of the local church and paraded around the parish.

Furthermore in the Middle Ages the legend of St George and the dragon grew up. Many places also paraded a model dragon.

However after the Reformation the cult of the saints was swept away in England and St George lost much of his importance. Unlike many national saints St George has been neglected, rather like the English in general. However in recent years St Georges Day has been revived – thanks to English nationalism, which has also been revived since the 1990’s – as a patriotic symbol of England, the English nation and the white English people.

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Lest we forget

noel-hodgson

Lt. William Noel Hodgson

Serving with the 9th Battalion the Devonshire Regiment, Lieutenant William Noel Hodgson was on the battlefield near the French village of Mametz in June 1916, preparing for what history now records as the Battle of the Somme. The scheduled date for the start of the battle was originally to be August 1916, but had been brought forward to the 29th June, 1916. Owing to bad weather in the week building up to the battle the date of the attack was postponed at 11.00 hours on 28th June and moved by two days to the morning of 1st July 1916.

It is believed that Noel Hodgson (who was the son of the Bishop of St. Edmundbury and Ipswich and before the war had been studying classics at Christ Church, Oxford) wrote the poem Before Action on 29th June.

By all the glories of the day
And the cool evening’s benison
By that last sunset touch that lay
Upon the hills when day was done,
By beauty lavishly outpoured
And blessings carelessly received,
By all the days that I have lived
Make me a soldier, Lord.


By all of all man’s hopes and fears
And all the wonders poets sing,
The laughter of unclouded years,
And every sad and lovely thing;
By the romantic ages stored
With high endeavour that was his,
By all his mad catastrophes
Make me a man, O Lord.


I, that on my familiar hill
Saw with uncomprehending eyes
A hundred of thy sunsets spill
Their fresh and sanguine sacrifice,
Ere the sun swings his noonday sword
Must say good-bye to all of this; –
By all delights that I shall miss,
Help me to die, O Lord.

Within an hour of the attack it is said that Lieutanant Hodgson was killed. He was aged 23. He would never again see a sunset.hodgson-grave

That night Lieutenant Hodgson’s body was retrieved and brought back into the British Front Line position, along with over 160 of his comrades. They were buried in the vicinity of a little wood called Mansell Copse which was in the British Front Line trench position at the start of the day.

A ceremony was held at the burial site on 4th July. A wooden cross was put up at the time by the survivors of the 9th and 8th Battalions of the Devonshire Regiment. Carved on the cross were the words: “The Devonshires held this trench, the Devonshires hold it still.” The graves were left in this position when the cemeteries were rebuilt after the war. 163 graves are now contained in the cemetery which is named “Devonshire Cemetery”. All but one of the casualties are men of the Devonshire Regiment. Lieutenant Noel Hodgson is buried in Grave reference A. 3.

Thirty-three years on from Lt. Hodgson’s supreme sacrifice his fellow Englishmen were again called upon to give their lives in a second European civil war.  Fast forward another six or seven decades and their great-grandchildren were despatched to Iraq and Afghanistan in further wickedly destructive conflicts, which like those 20th century wars are leaving our nation in a worse state – morally, financially and strategically – despite a seemingly endless blood sacrifice.

The England First Party salutes the memory of those who will never grow old.  We hope that their legacy will be a commitment to rebuild an England that they would have been proud of, while ensuring that present and future generations do not share their fate.

GermanSoldiersFlandersWW19141918

German soldiers in Flanders during World War I: Lt Hodgson's fellow Europeans, drawn into a bloody and pointless civil war with their English cousins

HMV Withdraws ‘Anyone But England’ Merchandise

The high street retailer HMV has withdrawn anti-English merchandise following complaints from members of the public and the Campaign for an English Parliament.

A police officer last week visited the HMV store in Kirkcaldy, Fife – part of former Prime Minister Gordon Brown’s constituency – to inform management of complaints about a range of ‘Anyone But England’ T-shirts.

For the full story click here [external link]

Stop Anglophobia! Leicester (23/05/2010)

The Streets of Leicester, 23 May 2010:

May 23 2010 – Stop Anglophobia Demo: Leicester City Clock Tower.

Overall it was a fantastic turnout and a well executed peaceful demo against the continuous Anglophobia happening here in England and also its surrounding countries. Lets keep up the good work!

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The English Shieldwall: http://englishshieldwall.weebly.com/support-us.html

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Stop Anglophobia – Facebook Page/Photos

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Stop Anglophobia – YouTube Video

The Most Hateful Quote of 2009

Thanks to Colonel Buckshot for highlighting this one…  The full top ten are posted over at James Edwards – the Political Cesspool

BLOGOSPHERE, 02 Jan 2010:

It’s horrifying to imagine kids being proud to be white.
Quote from: Newsweek, Sept. 14, 2009

Read Colonel Buckshot [external link]

Read The Top Ten Most Hateful Quotes of 2009 [external link]

Spare us the balloon slogans about freedom, identity, democracy and security…

Excellent 2006 article by Frank Kimbal Johnson reposted recently on the Guarding the Old Flag blog.

BLOGOSPHERE, 28 Dec 2009: There are ‘mostly other directed’ and ‘mostly inner directed’ people, and any amount of research has shown that the latter are quite a small minority of the population at any given time. There is a kind of social magnetism which draws people into ‘going with the flow’, as in crowd behaviour at outdoor and indoor events. On such occasions personal perceptions and judgement are usually submerged in the collective response. Hence the old Spanish saying that shepherds may change, but sheep remain sheep. But however rugged one’s individuality, the fact is we are all social animals and therefore obliged to take some interest in the way our society is governed. Neglect of this responsibility leaves the field open to career politicians with the ingrained conceit that they know best what everybody else should be doing and what matters most in the world. They like to call this megalomania ‘leadership’, when all it usually amounts to is self-serving bossiness and exploitation of the gullible via largely complicit mass media.

So when you hear someone disclaiming any interest in politics, you are probably in the company of sheep. Such complacency is of course fostered by bland assurances that British democracy is designed to protect the public good and ensure our most cherished traditions and aspirations inform government policy. Added to which we have the opportunity to choose between main contenders for political office at approximately five-year intervals, thus giving us the kind of government most people want.

So much for the theory. What really happens is that, over the years, certain factions contrive to subordinate the public to an ‘Establishment’ deeply entrenched behind complex legalistic barricades, and with its own self-serving agenda and priorities.

Read full article [external link]

BBC says Fish & Chips not English

English Fish and Chips

“The unlikely origin of fish and chips.”

BBC.CO.UK, 21 Dec 2009: Fish and chips are a national institution – and now chippies across the country are preparing to celebrate the 150th birthday of our most famous fast food.

Winston Churchill called them “the good companions”. John Lennon smothered his in tomato ketchup. Michael Jackson liked them with mushy peas.

They sustained morale through two world wars and helped fuel Britain’s industrial prime.

For generations, fish and chips have fed millions of memories – eaten with greasy fingers on a seaside holiday, a pay-day treat at the end of the working week or a late-night supper on the way home from the pub.

Read full article [external link]

UK Muslims are Europe’s most patriotic

'Patriot British Muslims' who aided 7-7 bombers

'Patriotic British Muslims' found guilty of aiding 7-7 bombers

Muslims in Britain are the most patriotic in Europe — but more than a quarter in some parts of the country still do not feel British, according to a new study.

THE TIMES, 13 Dec 2009: The report, funded by George Soros, the billionaire philanthropist, found that on average 78% of Muslims identified themselves as British, although this dropped by six points in east London. This compares with 49% of Muslims who consider themselves French and just 23% who feel German.

The findings, based on more than 2,000 detailed interviews, suggest that Muslims may be better integrated in Britain than in other parts of the European Union.

The report will reopen the debate about the merits of multiculturalism, a policy that has actively promoted cultural and religious differences among minorities in Britain but has been criticised as a barrier to integration by Trevor Phillips, chairman of the Equality and Human Rights Commission.

Read full article [external link]

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