23 years after his death, Enoch Powell’s legacy haunts modern Britain

Enoch Powell was sacked from the Conservative shadow cabinet in 1968 for warning against Britain’s racial transformation.

23 years ago the political prophet Enoch Powell died, aged 85. Though he had been a prominent figure in British politics for decades, he remains best known for one speech, delivered on 20th April 1968 in Birmingham, and known almost immediately as the “rivers of blood” speech.

This is a slight misquotation, as Powell was quoting the Roman poet Virgil, whose Aeneid – an epic composed around 20 BC – described a prophecy delivered to Aeneas, the Trojan hero and legendary founder of Rome.

“As I look ahead, I am filled with foreboding; like the Roman, I seem to see ‘the River Tiber foaming with much blood’.”

In the light of last year’s ‘Black Lives Matter’ protests, the previous sentence of Powell’s speech is especially prophetic. After giving several examples of the terrible consequences of the multiracialism that was beginning to transform our country, Powell mentioned the Race Relations Act then passing through Parliament.

“Here is the means of showing that the immigrant communities can organise to consolidate their members, to agitate and campaign against their fellow citizens, and to overawe and dominate the rest with the legal weapons which the ignorant and the ill-informed have provided.”

Whether Britons will continue to be overawed and dominated – whether we will continue to tear down statues and uproot our heritage – remains to be seen. ‘Normal politics’ is set to resume late next month as candidates are nominated for local and regional elections in most of the UK, though under circumstances that will make campaigning difficult.

These will be the first opportunity for Britons in the privacy of the ballot box to give their reaction to the anti-White agenda – the truly deadly virus of our times – that has spread across the world since the death of career criminal George Floyd.

Do the British retain the spirit of resistance to national suicide that animated Enoch Powell?

Will the 2021 elections be postponed again?

London Mayor Sadiq Khan should have faced re-election last year, will the contest be postponed again this year?

Election officials in Lancashire have written to the government suggesting that this year’s local elections should again be postponed – or else held on an all-postal basis, due to the Covid-19 pandemic making it unsafe or impractical to hold elections as scheduled on May 6th.

The 2020 elections – including the London mayoralty and Greater London Assembly – were postponed in the early stages of the pandemic. This means that already many councillors and mayors have served an extra 12 months, and that this year’s elections were in any case going to combine the scheduled 2020 and 2021 contests.

There have been conflicting messages as to whether it’s feasible for the elections to go ahead this year. North West England was one of several regions that had an experimental ‘pilot’ project of all-postal elections in 2004, which resulted in a significantly increased turnout, but for various reasons it was decided not to continue the experiment.

Controversial journalist Katie Hopkins this week joined UKIP – but this year’s elections (even if they go ahead) might well be the party’s last stand

For racial nationalists this year might have seen the first electoral test for the new Patriotic Alternative party, if the Electoral Commission approve its registration in time. The National Front and the For Britain Movement will certainly have a few candidates if the elections go ahead, while Dr Jim Lewthwaite intends to stand in Bradford for the British Democratic Party. The late Richard Edmonds had planned to stand for the NF in last year’s elections before they were postponed, and had he lived would have been a candidate in May this year.

Any elections this year might also see the last gasp of UKIP and the debut of Nigel Farage’s new Reform UK party.

Perhaps more seriously, it could be the last gasp of the Union, with the Scottish National Party set to make further gains at the expense of both Labour and the Tories, and perhaps setting the scene for a second independence referendum. The decision whether to postpone this year’s elections north of the border rests with Nicola Sturgeon’s devolved government, so it’s possible there could be elections in Scotland, but none in England or Wales. No elections are scheduled this year in any case in Northern Ireland.

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