Sensational gain for For Britain’s Julian Leppert

For Britain’s Julian Leppert has won the Waltham Abbey Paternoster ward in Epping Forest with more than 40% of the vote.

H&D subscriber Julian Leppert won Waltham Abbey Paternoster with 40.7% of the vote, almost 100 votes ahead of the second-placed Conservative. This is one of the best nationalist election results ever, all the better against a background where the movement is in disarray. Former BNP councillor Pat Richardson finished runner-up in Waltham Abbey Honey Lane ward with 23%.

In Cliffsend and Pegwell ward, Thanet, former BNP candidate Michael Barnbrook (not related to former GLA member Richard Barnbrook) polled 14.4% for For Britain.

Julian Leppert (above right) – elected yesterday as a For Britain councillor in Epping Forest – seen here with controversial columnist Katie Hopkins.

For Britain also gained a seat from Labour in De Bruce ward, Hartlepool, while in Crewe North, Cheshire East, parish councillor Brian Silvester (a former Tory who defected from UKIP to For Britain) finished runner-up with 297 votes (30.7%).

By contrast in Stoke-on-Trent their only defending councillor Richard Broughan (who had defected to FB from UKIP) finished bottom of the poll with 7.7%; in Exeter the sole For Britain candidate was again bottom of the poll; and in Salford they polled only 3.9%. The obvious lesson is that a well-organised campaign pays dividends. Also there can undoubtedly be a problem where even a well-organised party branch is up against a better known ‘brand name’. For Britain’s candidate in Temple Newsam ward, Leeds, finished bottom of the poll with just 2.5% to UKIP’s 14.0%.

Jamie Rushworth in Town ward, Calderdale – won fifteen years ago by the BNP’s Halifax organiser Adrian Marsden – finished a respectable third for For Britain with 12.0%. Similarly Liam Robinson polled 12% as For Britain candidate in Darwen South ward, Blackburn with Darwen. In Great Barr with Yew Tree ward, Sandwell, Lorraine Binsley polled 12.9% for For Britain; while in Maryport South ward, Allerdale, H&D patron Dave King polled 11.1%.

The Democrats & Veterans party that broke away from UKIP has won two seats in Barnsley – another outstanding result. In Holme Valley South ward, Kirklees, an energetic D&V campaign produced a strong third place with 14.1%, pushing UKIP into last place with 5.8%. Other D&V results included Graham Doherty’s 11.6% in Longdendale ward, Tameside.

Julian Leppert celebrates his election win with For Britain leader Anne Marie Waters and members of his campaign team.

Meanwhile in Sheffield both D&V and the National Front were overshadowed by UKIP (even though the latter failed to win any seats). NF deputy chairman Jordan Pont polled 0.8% in East Ecclesfield ward, compared to UKIP’s 19.8%. In the parallel election for Ecclesfield parish council, where he had no UKIP opposition, Mr Pont’s result was more than ten times better: here he polled 8.5% of votes cast.

In Wyke ward, Bradford, Dr Jim Lewthwaite of the British Democrats achieved an excellent second place with 701 votes (24.5%). His fellow British Democrat Kevan Stafford polled 121 votes (5.3%) in a dual vacancy election for Loughborough Shelthorpe ward, Charnwood.

Dr Jim Lewthwaite addressing a John Tyndall Memorial Meeting organised by H&D – he polled 24.5% this week in Bradford.

Across the Pennines in Todmorden ward, Calderdale, the NF’s Chris Jackson polled 4.6%, up from 2.7% last year. The best NF result was in Brunshaw ward, Burnley, where Steven Smith (organiser of Burnley BNP in its glory days) polled 182 votes (16.3%).

Former NF and BNP activist Mick Sharpe polled 4.2% as English Democrat candidate in Ripley & Marehay ward, Amber Valley. ED leader Robin Tilbrook, who secured nationwide publicity for his legal action aiming to secure Brexit, polled 17.2% in Chipping Ongar, Greensted and Marden Ash ward, Epping Forest.

A tiny group of former UKIP activists remain loyal to the party’s ex-leader Henry Bolton, whose new ‘Our Nation’ party had four candidates in Dover. Their strongest results were achieved by Graham Lane in Buckland ward, who polled 21%, and defending councillor Ben Glayzer who lost his seat in Tower Hamlets ward after polling 16.9%. Our Nation’s only other candidate was in Peterborough, where unlike his Dover colleagues Jack Penny had UKIP opposition and was predictably crushed, polling only 1.7%.

Against a background of ‘Brexit betrayal’, and with both major parties divided and discredited, UKIP should have been making gains, instead they have been losing seats nationwide. These losses were offset by a handful of gains as voters reacted with mixed anger and cynicism against the main political parties.

Some of the earliest results came in Sunderland, where UKIP made gains against an unpopular Labour-controlled council. Readers should be careful not to draw too many conclusions from Sunderland, which is likely to be atypically hostile to Labour and friendly to UKIP. For example UKIP’s obsession with Islam failed to gain the party any seats in Rochdale or Oldham, two of the party’s main target areas, though two UKIP gains were made in Derby, which seems to be the party’s best branch.

The full nationwide picture reflects UKIP’s collapse in so many of its former strongholds, but one bright spot is Hapton with Park ward, Burnley: the very same ward that once had a full set of three BNP councillors now has a full set of UKIP after Peter Gill gained the third seat from Labour. There was very nearly a second gain for Burnley UKIP: they missed out in Gawthorpe ward by just nine votes. Arguably UKIP’s best branch is in Derby, where they gained two seats and now have five city councillors.

Meanwhile in Mill Hill & Moorgate ward, Blackburn with Darwen, a ward that combines areas once won by the BNP and the England First Party, UKIP’s Michael Longbottom greatly improved his vote finishing runner-up with 34%, up from 13.6% last year. The point is that this is the type of area where UKIP would be winning seats now had they not self-destructed in recent years.

Similarly in two working-class Preston wards close to the H&D office, UKIP failed to make any progress, polling 23.0% in Brookfield and 23.3% in Ribbleton, despite this year’s elections being for all three vacancies in each redrawn ward, greatly helping smaller parties. Each of these wards ought to be winnable for UKIP or indeed for a serious, electorally-focused nationalist party.

Gerard Batten’s party will justifiably be celebrating gains from Labour in three Sunderland wards and also gained one seat in Hartlepool, but results here indicated that there is now a substantial general protest vote, which we can expect to see nationwide – with For Britain plus various independents as well as Liberal Democrats and Greens making gains.

One such independent gain was in Failsworth East ward, Oldham, with former UKIP councillor Warren Bates narrowly failing to regain a seat as an independent in next door Failsworth West. Oldham was meant to be one of the few areas where UKIP were still making progress, contesting fourteen seats across the borough, but they failed even to come close to winning a seat: their best votes were 25.9% in Hollinwood, 25.1% in Royton South, and 23.7% in Chadderton South.

UKIP lost both seats they were defending in Sheffield, and are now down to just one Sheffield councillor.

The once significant BNP is down to just two candidates nationwide. Ian Seeby polled 15.4% in Cheshunt South & Theobalds ward, Broxbourne – the first time that the BNP has fought this ward, benefiting from the disappearance of UKIP in this area. Ron Ball in Swanley St Mary’s ward, Sevenoaks, was bottom of the poll with 45 votes (5.5%). This is a ward that the BNP won in 2009.

Former BNP activist Pete Molloy won a town council seat in Spennymoor

Former BNP activist Joe Owens polled 2.4% as an Independent candidate in the Labour stronghold of Kensington & Fairfield, Liverpool. Another former BNP activist Pete Molloy polled 12.7% in a by-election for Spennymoor ward, Durham. In a simultaneous parish council election Mr Molloy was elected to Spennymoor Town Council with 488 votes (31.3%). Readers should note this is a more substantial election than most parish council contests: often these are depoliticised contests with low turnouts, but this is certainly not the case in Spennymoor. Mr Molloy has rescued a real nationalist victory from the wreckage of the BNP.

Another well known ex-BNP activist standing as an independent this year was Alan Girvan, who polled a very impressive 785 votes (18.4%) in Heckmondwike ward, Kirklees.

Britain First has failed to register as a political party, but two of the group’s activists stood as independents. Paul Rudge polled 26.7% in Rowley ward, Sandwell, while Geoff Miles took 10.1% in Ware Trinity ward, East Hertfordshire.

British Resistance candidate Carl Mason, an ally of the controversial Jack Sen, polled 17 votes (1.0%) in Nunnery ward, Worcester. In West ward, Chichester, former BNP organiser Dr Andrew Emerson polled 84 votes (3.6%) for his Patria party.

H&D will bring further coverage of election results as they are declared in remaining councils this afternoon. Some Northern Ireland results – including Court ward, Belfast, where Jolene Bunting, an independent councillor once linked to Britain First, is seeking re-election, will not be declared until tomorrow (Saturday).

Final candidate totals for 2019 local elections

With today’s release of nominations for local authority elections in Northern Ireland, H&D can now publish our calculation of the final candidate totals for the UK’s various eurosceptic / nationalist political parties.

Not all of these parties are in any way racial nationalist, and not all racial nationalists are in any way eurosceptic, but we publish this list for our readers’ interest in showing the state of British electoral politics everywhere to the right of the Conservative Party.

Perhaps even “right” is not the correct word, but it is from somewhere within this spectrum that a new force will have to be drawn to rescue the United Kingdom from its multiracial / multicultural chaos of recent decades.

UKIP has eighteen candidates in various parts of Ulster, given them a total of 1,400 candidates across the UK for the scheduled local council elections, plus three mayoral candidates and about twenty in local by-elections that are also being held on May 2nd.

In other words UKIP will be contesting 16% of the available seats this year

Anne Marie Waters’ For Britain Movement has no candidates in Ulster, so their total remains 42.

Democrats & Veterans have three Ulster candidates, giving them 20 nationwide, plus a by-election candidate in the London Borough of Lewisham.

The new party Aontú, on which H&D recently reported, is a socially conservative and eurosceptic split from both Sinn Féin and the SDLP (north of the border) and Fianna Fáil south of the border. Aontú has sixteen candidates in various parts of Northern Ireland: an impressive total for a very new party.

Jolene Bunting, originally elected as a councillor for Traditional Unionist Voice, later became associated with the anti-Islamist group Britain First, which has failed to register as a political party but is supporting two independent candidates for English councils. Ms Bunting is standing as an Independent in the Court area of Belfast. It is not clear to H&D precisely what her present relationship is with Britain First following some internal rows last year.

TUV themselves have 32 local authority candidates this year.

So the updated candidate totals are as follows:

  • UKIP 1,400
  • For Britain 42
  • Traditional Unionist Voice 32
  • Democrats & Veterans 20
  • Aontú 16
  • English Democrats 10
  • Veterans & People’s Party 7
  • Our Nation 5
  • National Front 3
  • Populist 3
  • Britain First (standing as Independents) 3
  • British Democrats 2
  • BNP 2
  • British Resistance 1
  • Patria 1
  • Independents 3

For further details check our earlier articles on election nominations here and here.

H&D will continue to report on the local election campaign, and will include a comprehensive report on the results in our next issue, which as a consequence will appear slightly later than normal in early May.

UKIP misses broadcast target as NF overtakes dying BNP

UKIP leader Gerard Batten (left) with EDL founder Stephen Yaxley-Lennon (alias ‘Tommy Robinson’) whose increasingly close relationship with the party has prompted Nigel Farage and others to resign.

The United Kingdom Independence Party will have 1,382 candidates at the local council elections on May 2nd, according to an analysis by Heritage and Destiny. Our estimate is based on documents from 270 English councils and does not yet include Northern Ireland, where candidate totals have not yet been published. (There will also be a few UKIP local by-election candidates, and three Mayoral candidates on the same day.)

This is less than half the number that UKIP had aimed for to qualify for a television broadcast.

However even to reach this number (given the collapse of many UKIP branches) involved a colossal effort by the party’s national headquarters, twisting the arms of local members.

There are several councils where UKIP even its present state has managed to put up a full slate of candidates for every vacancy: these include Derby, Sunderland, North Tyneside, Worcester, Bolton and Eastleigh.

Alan Graves, leader of the UKIP group on Derby City Council, one of the party’s most successful branches

However there are others where the party is now reduced to a token effort or has disappeared from the electoral map: these include Blackpool, Fylde, Lincoln, Basildon, Solihull and Middlesbrough. Most notably UKIP has been almost obliterated in its former strongholds of Thurrock (where it is down to two candidates) and Thanet (a council UKIP used to control but now has only three candidates). Numerous former UKIP councillors are standing in these areas as ‘Thurrock Independents’ or ‘Thanet Independents’.

The good news for Gerard Batten’s party is that in the absence of his most important rival Nigel Farage – whose new Brexit Party is sitting out these local elections and concentrating on potential European and General Elections later this year – UKIP has comfortably outshone three other splinter parties. We are not yet aware of any local council candidates formally designated as ‘Brexit Party’, though in practice a number of ‘Thanet Independents’ and ‘Thurrock Independents’ will probably end up following Farage.

The For Britain Movement founded by former UKIP leadership candidate Anne Marie Waters will have 42 council candidates nationwide, according to H&D‘s analysis. These include eight in Leeds; four in the West Midlands racial battleground of Sandwell; three in Stoke; and perhaps most significantly two in Epping Forest. These latter two – former BNP councillor Patricia Richardson and former BNP London mayoral candidate Julian Leppert – are among the few candidates from the broad spectrum of British nationalism who have a chance of winning this year.

Anne Marie Waters on the by-election campaign trail with former BNP election guru Eddy Butler, who now runs For Britain’s strongest branch

Another UKIP splinter group Democrats & Veterans, founded by former UKIP leadership candidate John Rees-Evans, has 17 candidates in the main local elections, plus one in a London Borough of Lewisham by-election. The strongest D&V branches are in Yorkshire, where they have three candidates in Barnsley and three in Sheffield.

The English Democrats won over a few BNP defectors during 2010-2011, and though most of this group have since left the party, ED leader Robin Tilbrook has scored a publicity coup in recent weeks after launching a legal action to rescue Brexit. The EDs have ten local council candidates this year, including six in Barnsley. In the Derbyshire borough of Amber Valley their sole candidate is former NF and BNP activist Mick Sharpe.

The Veterans’ and People’s Party has a manifesto that combines independence from European control with some traditionally socialist / social democratic policies on housing and welfare. Their interim leader is Robin Horsfall, an SAS veteran of the famous Iranian Embassy siege in 1980. VAPP have seven candidates in different council areas.

UKIP’s short-lived leader Henry Bolton, who was forced to quit in February 2018, now leads a tiny party of loyal followers called Our Nation: they have five candidates this year, all but one of them in Dover.

NF candidate for Brunshaw ward, Burnley, Steven Smith (left)

There are no elections this year in London or Birmingham, which has drastically reduced the number of potential National Front candidates. In fact there are just three NF council candidates this year: deputy chairman Jordan Pont in Sheffield; Chris Jackson in Calderdale; and Steven Smith in Burnley.

Despite this relatively modest campaign, 2019 might go down in history as the year the NF overtook the BNP. The truth is that the NF has for a year or two now been much the more significant nationalist organisation, in all but the financial sense. Nevertheless it will shock many observers that the BNP are down to just two council candidates this year, one in Broxbourne and the other in Sevenoaks.

Dr Jim Lewthwaite, British Democrats chairman and one of last year’s most successful nationalist candidates.

The British Democrats (mostly made up of former BNP members) will have two candidates this year. Former councillor Dr Jim Lewthwaite again contests Wyke ward, Bradford, where he achieved one of last year’s best nationalist results; while Kevan Stafford contests Loughborough Shelthorpe ward, Charnwood.

Former BNP organiser Dr Andrew Emerson continues to run his breakaway party Patria, and will again be the party’s sole candidate in Chichester.

Similarly the British Resistance party, closely associated with controversial ex-UKIP candidate Jack Sen, will have just one candidate this year – Mr Sen’s ally Carl Mason in Worcester.

Several prominent nationalists are supporting the Populist Party‘s campaign in Sunderland, where they will have two candidates in the scheduled May 2nd elections, plus a third in a by-election held the same day.

Pete Molloy, an Independent nationalist candidate in Spennymoor

There are also several veteran nationalists standing as Independents or without a party label this year. These include Pete Molloy in Spennymoor ward, Durham; Alan Girvan in Heckmondwike ward, Kirklees; and Joe Owens in Kensington & Fairfield ward, Liverpool.

The eager publicity-seekers of Britain First have failed to register with the Electoral Commission as a political party, so their name cannot appear on ballot papers. However Paul Rudge (a Britain First activist) will be standing as an independent in Rowley ward, Sandwell, as will his Britain First colleague Geoff Miles in Ware Trinity ward, East Hertfordshire.

Summary of eurosceptic / nationalist candidate totals at 2019 local council elections:

  • UKIP 1,382
  • For Britain 42
  • Democrats & Veterans 17
  • English Democrats 10
  • Veterans’ and People’s Party 7
  • Our Nation 5
  • National Front 3
  • Populist 3
  • British Democrats 2
  • BNP 2
  • Britain First (standing as independents) 2
  • British Resistance 1
  • Patria 1
  • Independents 3

Political Vacuum at 2019 Elections

Despite the Great Brexit Betrayal at Westminster, this year’s local elections bear witness to a vacuum where nationalist (and even eurosceptic) politics used to exist.

Nominations closed this afternoon with polling day on May 2nd, and though many councils have yet to publish their lists of candidates, it seems from H&D‘s early analysis that UKIP and its various splinters have put up smaller slates than expected, though almost everywhere UKIP remains well ahead of its rivals For Britain and Democrats & Veterans.

An exception is Epping Forest, where an efficient For Britain branch directed by former BNP election guru Eddy Butler is fielding two candidates, both of them ex-BNP, compared to one for UKIP. Former BNP councillor Mrs Patricia Richardson in Waltham Abbey Honey Lane and former London mayoral candidate Julian Leppert in Waltham Abbey Paternoster have already carried out extensive leafletting and are among the very few nationalist candidates with any chance of winning this year. Elsewhere in the borough English Democrat leader Robin Tilbrook is contesting his home ward of Chipping Ongar.

Stoke-on-Trent, once a jewel in the BNP crown, now elects its full complement of councillors once every four years, so 2019 should have been an important opportunity for both UKIP and Anne Marie Waters’ For Britain Movement, who presently have their sole councillor here.

Some anti-fascist “experts” had predicted a big slate of For Britain candidates here: in fact there are only three, including incumbent councillor Richard Broughan. Similarly UKIP have just three Stoke candidates.

A more impressive showing for Ms Waters’ party is in Leeds, where they are contesting eight of the 33 vacancies – in three of these they will have no UKIP opponent. UKIP have 16 Leeds candidates, and in Bramley & Stanningley ward voters will have UKIP, For Britain and the English Democrats on their ballot paper!

Another failure is in Burnley, where UKIP is contesting only three of the 15 wards and For Britain none. While racial nationalist parties are conspicuous by their absence from most ballot papers, there is one National Front candidate in Burnley – former BNP organiser Steven Smith, who we are pleased to note will have no UKIP opposition in the Brunshaw ward.

Other NF candidates so far declared include the party’s deputy chairman Jordan Pont in East Ecclesfield ward, Sheffield (where he unfortunately has UKIP opposition); and Chris Jackson in his home ward of Todmorden, Calderdale. Like Steven Smith, Chris has no UKIP opposition. Across Sheffield, UKIP are contesting 22 of the 28 vacancies, while D&V have three candidates, only one of whom has UKIP opposition. In Calderdale there are no UKIP candidates at all, and just one For Britain candidate.

Dr Jim Lewthwaite of the British Democrats

Former councillor Dr Jim Lewthwaite is again contesting Wyke ward, Bradford, for the British Democrats. He has no UKIP or D&V opponent and can expect a creditable result. The British Democrats are also contesting Loughborough Shelthorpe ward in Charnwood, Leicestershire.

Elsewhere in Bradford there are nine UKIP candidates, one from D&V, and none from For Britain, even though the latter’s head office is in the city!

For Britain (like the National Front before them) focused much campaigning energy in Rochdale following various Asian/Muslim scandals, but this has produced nothing electorally: UKIP will contest 16 of the 20 Rochdale wards, For Britain none. Even more startling is the total absence of nationalist/eurosceptic parties in Blackpool, an area that voted 75% for Brexit and where (as in Rochdale) there has been extensive campaigning by a range of anti-Islamist groups. For Britain supporters have talked for some time about targeting Blackpool, but they have not fielded a single candidate, and this year there will be no-one from Blackpool UKIP on the ballot paper either.

A similarly rare example of UKIP progress (at least in terms of candidates) is Oldham, where there is a serious slate of 14 UKIP candidates – though not the full slate of 20 that gullible “anti-fascists” had predicted. In nearby Tameside, UKIP have five candidates, Democrats & Veterans one, and For Britain none; while in Stockport there are six UKIP candidates and none from D&V or FB.

Yet another hopelessly inaccurate prediction by lavishly funded “anti-fascist experts” was in Hartlepool, where UKIP was said to have collapsed in favour of For Britain. In fact For Britain has just one candidate in Hartlepool, compared to three for UKIP, one for Democrats & Veterans, and a profusion of independents.

Thanks to boundary changes the most racially divided borough in England – Blackburn with Darwen – has an all-out election, so as in Stoke this should have been a bonanza year for any party seeking to recover some of the votes once cast for the BNP and the England First Party. Yet UKIP have just four candidates, and For Britain none.

Across the Pennines, UKIP is contesting only five of 21 vacancies in Wakefield; and eight out of 23 in Kirklees.

The English Democrats have staged a mini-revival in Barnsley, perhaps helped by the bold action of their leader Robin Tilbrook in launching a legal action to rescue Brexit. There are six EDs here (for 21 vacancies), compared to just three for UKIP and three from the UKIP splinter group Democrats & Veterans. D&V also have two candidates in Kirklees. Another English Democrat candidate is former NF and BNP activist Mick Sharpe, contesting Ripley & Marehay ward, Amber Valley.

In Sunderland UKIP have managed a full slate of 26 candidates, while For Britain and D&V each have just one. Elsewhere in the North-East the eurosceptic cause is less vigorous: Gateshead has seven UKIP candidates for 22 vacancies. Darlington is one of the very few councils anywhere in England where UKIP (with two candidates) has been overtaken by For Britain (with three). In Cheshire East the former UKIP councillor Brian Silvester (who has been re-elected unopposed as a parish councillor) is the sole For Britain candidate, and there is no-one from UKIP.

Another former nationalist heartland where none of the existing parties is reaping electoral potential is the West Midlands borough of Sandwell. UKIP and For Britain each have just four candidates here for 24 vacancies: the only good news is that only one ward has the parties fighting each other. Next door in Dudley there are fourteen UKIP candidates and none from For Britain.

Among the many former UKIP strongholds where the party has collapsed is Thurrock, where almost the entire former UKIP branch has regrouped as ‘Thurrock Independents’. They will have a full slate of seventeen candidates, while UKIP have only two. Similarly there are only three UKIP candidates this year in Thanet, where they once controlled the council and Nigel Farage once hoped to become an MP. The bulk of Thanet’s UKIP activists now call themselves ‘Thanet Independents’. Like their Thurrock counterparts, they will probably end up in Farage’s new Brexit Party, but this is gearing up to fight European (and perhaps General) elections, not local councils. For Britain has one Thanet candidate – ex-BNP parliamentary candidate Michael Barnbrook.

Veteran nationalist Joe Owens is contesting the Kensington & Fairfield ward of his native Liverpool, without a party description, but can be expected to run a professional campaign. Other nationalist independents include Paul Rudge, a Britain First activist standing in Rowley ward, Sandwell, with the party’s backing but without its name on the ballot paper; and former BNP activist Pete Molloy, standing in the Spennymoor ward of Durham.

During the next two days as councils continue to publish their lists of candidates, H&D will carry out a complete analysis of the nationalist/eurosceptic electoral picture, and of course our next edition will report on the election results and our movement’s prospects for recovery.

So far this year’s local election picture can be summarised as follows: UKIP has collapsed in many former strongholds, rather as the BNP did before its eventual death, while retaining pockets of strength. While his embrace of radical anti-Islamism has contributed to UKIP’s implosion, party leader Gerard Batten has the consolation that this same strategy has probably helped to stifle the For Britain Movement, whose founder Anne Marie Waters had hoped that anti-Islamism would be her party’s unique selling point.

Though failing to make a breakthrough in terms of defections from UKIP and overall candidate numbers, For Britain can reasonably hope to elect one or two councillors – perhaps in Stoke, perhaps in Epping Forest, perhaps in Thanet.

Overall however – while in past years we would have been looking at dozens of racial nationalist councillors, and hundreds of UKIP councillors – this year’s elections are likely merely to confirm the continuing crisis of both nationalism and euroscepticism, despite an obvious public appetite for alternatives to the Westminster charade.


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