Dying UKIP prepares for leadership contest

David Coburn (left) with former UKIP leader Nigel Farage

David Coburn (left) with former UKIP leader Nigel Farage

The United Kingdon Independence Party continues its recent record of embarrassment, stumbling around in search of credible leadership, following last week’s disastrous General Election results.

Today David Coburn, UKIP’s sole MEP in Scotland announced that he would contest the leadership vacated on Friday by Paul Nuttall, who had been in the top job for just over six months. Mr Coburn is an ally of former leader Nigel Farage, and has said that if Farage decides to return he will not stand against him.

On the same day that he expressed his interest in the party leadership, Mr Coburn (who is openly homosexual) received unwelcome publicity in the Daily Record, Scotland’s best-selling newspaper.

The Record published its investigation of Scottish Dawn, described as successor to the nationalist youth movement National Action which is banned under the Terrorism Act.

Today's Daily Record front page

Today’s Daily Record front page

Ruaidhri McKim (a Scottish Dawn activist) was secretly filmed discussing his links to National Action and the Polish nationalist organisation NOP, as well as his membership of UKIP.  Mr McKim said:
I was in UKIP for a while. Then after Brexit I just left because I didn’t see a point in it anymore. There’s lots of radical people within it, but no one with any position is a radical. UKIP Scotland was fucked man. I’ve been drunk with David Coburn – he’s really good fun. He’s a fun guy.

Mr Coburn commented:
I think this chap is grandstanding and blethering and I am surprised you are taking him remotely seriously. I am homosexual, speak Arabic and various other languages and I have spent my entire life fighting ignorance, racial and sexual intolerance. Print this crap and I will sue this individual, you and your organ.

As UKIP continues to flounder, the ugly face of British Conservatism was exposed today when it emerged that the managing director of Jennings Racing (Britain’s largest independent bookmaking chain which trades under the name Jenningsbet) had emailed 500 staff before polling day warning them that only the Conservative Party would resist gambling reforms.

British gamblers lost £1.8bn last year on the notorious Fixed Odds Terminals

British gamblers lost £1.8bn last year on the notorious Fixed Odds Terminals

Labour and the Liberal Democrats had proposed reducing the maximum stake on the notorious fixed-odds betting terminals (FOBTs) from £100 to £2.  FOBTs are notorious for fleecing gambling addicts who pump the entire contents of their wallets and purses into these terminals which have proliferated on British high streets.

Jenningsbet has 400 terminals spread across 100 high street shops.  Each machine brings in an average of £53,000 per year, with Britain’s gambling addicts losing a record £1.8bn on FOBTs in the year to last September. Jenningsbet is co-owned by three Jewish brothers, the Pears family whose ancestor changed his name from Schleicher on arriving in Britain from Austria in the 19th century.

The Pears family are noted for their philanthropy to Jewish charities and Holocaust education, having established the Pears Institute for the Study of Antisemitism at Birkbeck College, London.

Gambling and property tycoon Trevor Pears, whose company warned its staff that only the Tories woulod resist reform of gambling laws

Gambling and property tycoon Trevor Pears, whose company warned its staff that only the Tories would resist reform of gambling laws

 

Arron Banks announces plans for post-UKIP movement

Arron Banks

Arron Banks says that UKIP has dispatched itself with “a strategic bullet to the back of the head”.

Following this week’s catastrophic election results which signalled the death of UKIP, the party’s former chief donor Arron Banks has issued a statement condemning new leader Paul Nuttall and confirming plans to launch “a new movement with radical policies and direct democracy”.

According to Banks this will “launch in the autumn after the General Election, once the electoral map has been redrawn”.

A close ally of ex-UKIP leader Nigel Farage, Banks contrasted the successes of the Farage era with the shambles that UKIP has become:

“If we use the analogy of UKIP as a racing car, Nigel was a skilled driver who drove the car around the track faster and faster, knowing when to take risks, delighting the audience.

“The current leadership has crashed the car, at the first bend of the race, into the crowd, killing the driver and spectators.

“As one of the Leave.EU team said to me: a strategic bullet to the back of the head.

“It’s a sorry state of affairs.”

Click here to read H&D‘s report on this week’s local elections.

Both here and in the journal Heritage and Destiny, we will continue to bring you updated news of the general election campaign as it affects racial nationalist parties and the broader movement.

 

UKIP disappears from the political map

Will Nigel Farage return to spearhead UKIP's General Election campaign, displacing his useless successor Paul Nuttall (right)

The Party’s Over: Nigel Farage (left) is no doubt relieved not to be sharing the blame for terrible UKIP results in 2017.

The 2017 elections have been even worse than predicted for UKIP – wiped off the map with not a single councillor re-elected. The collapsing share of the vote across what were once UKIP’s strongest counties repeated the pattern observed over the past year in H&D‘s regular analysis of local by-elections: down from 14.3% to 7.4% in Lincolnshire; from 20.0% to 6.3% in Suffolk; from 23.5% to 6.0% in Norfolk; and from 27.0% to 7.4% in Essex.

The party’s only success was in Padiham & Burnley West, Lancashire, where UKIP’s Alan Hosker won the county council seat once held by the BNP’s Sharon Wilkinson. (Strangely UKIP had failed to contest this in 2013 when Cllr Wilkinson stood down.) Elsewhere in Lancashire there were some UKIP disappointments in target divisions such as Preston East, where they polled 11.3%. (H&D editor Mark Cotterill had polled 22.3% in Preston East on slightly different boundaries in 2009.) In the neighbouring Preston South East UKIP fared even worse with just 6.7%, justly punished for failure to do any campaigning in these White working class areas of the city which voted heavily Leave in last year’s EU referendum.

Total UKIP support in Lancashire was down from 14.7% to 3.0% (partly reflecting a reduced number of candidates); similarly UKIP’s vote in Devon fell from 23.3% to 4.4%.

In overnight results UKIP votes collapsed across two former strongholds, Essex and Lincolnshire.

The landslide win for ex-UKIP councillor Kerry Smith, re-elected as an independent, contrasted with the near-annihilation of his former party.

The landslide win for ex-UKIP councillor Kerry Smith, re-elected as an independent, contrasted with the near-annihilation of his former party.

Ex-UKIP county councillor Kerry Smith (who was forced to quit the party in 2014 after a row over “offensive remarks”) retained his seat with a vastly increased majority, standing as an independent in the Basildon Westley Heights division of Essex. UKIP didn’t put up a candidate against him. Cllr Smith won 60.6% of the vote this time, compared to 29.0% when he first won the seat for UKIP in 2013.

But UKIP’s own official candidates were badly beaten. Every Essex UKIP seat was lost, including another Basildon division, Laindon Park & Fryerns, where they were pushed into third place.

Staying in Essex, UKIP lost the Thundersley division (part of the Castle Point constituency) to the Tories by almost 2,000 votes.  (Last time UKIP won this by 200.) Another Castle Point seat was lost to the Tories, again by more than 2,000 votes, in the South Benfleet division; while in the Harlow divisions UKIP incompetence led to their candidates failing to be validly nominated.

Labour’s defeats last night and today will make bigger headlines (especially some heavy losses to the Tories in Warwickshire) but by any objective measure this has been an even worse election for Paul Nuttall than for Jeremy Corbyn.

If this disaster is repeated at the General Election next month, Nigel Farage and his financial backer Arron Banks are sure to go ahead with their plans for a new ‘Patriotic Alliance’ to replace UKIP.

By far the best nationalist results were predictably in Pendle, an area of Lancashire where UKIP failed to put up any candidates and where the BNP has its sole remaining borough councillor, Brian Parker.

Mr Parker finished third with 719 votes (20.4%) in Pendle Central; his colleague John Rowe who was the only White candidate for the Nelson East division polled 500 votes (10.8%).

Ex-serviceman Pete Molloy, a former BNP activist, achieved one of the few good nationalist votes standing as an independent.

Ex-serviceman Pete Molloy, a former BNP activist, achieved one of the few good nationalist votes standing as an independent.

Outside Pendle the outstanding nationalist performance was ex-BNP activist Pete Molloy’s 601 votes (14.8%) standing as an independent in Spennymoor, Durham. Admittedly this is one of the rare areas that elects independent councillors, but Mr Molloy polled more than double the UKIP vote. On a bleak night for both nationalists and UKIP this was a rare bright spot.

Another ex-BNP (and in his case ex-BDP) candidate, ex-councillor Graham Partner, polled 66 votes (2.3%) in Coalville North, Leicestershire.

Among the overnight results the BNP highlight was their Eastern region organiser Richard Perry almost overtaking the fading UKIP in Heybridge & Tollesbury, an area of Essex where the BNP has campaigned almost solely on the issue of opposing “unsustainable” housing developments. Mr Perry polled 422 votes (8.2%), only 12 votes behind UKIP – but more than 2,500 votes behind the Tory winner.

In nearby Maldon, Mr Perry’s BNP colleague Trevor Cable (again fighting on the “unsustainable housing” issue and with this slogan on the ballot paper) fared less well with 115 votes (2.4%).

In the Basildon Pitsea division, BNP candidates Paul Borg and Christine Winter finished bottom of the poll with 2.1% (the same as the NF polled in 2013). Again UKIP were badly beaten here, in a division where they had been only just behind Labour in 2013.

The BNP’s Paul Hooks was again bottom of the poll in Halstead, polling 0.5% (down from 1.1% last time).

As in Essex, UKIP was wiped out in Lincolnshire (another former stronghold which includes the Boston & Skegness constituency targeted by Nuttall) losing seats in Boston and elsewhere to the Tories.

The UKIP vote across Lincolnshire was almost halved to 7.4% from 14.3% in 2013.

Robert Ashton, the BNP’s only Lincolnshire candidate, polled 46 votes (1.5%) in Louth South. In Hayling Island, Hampshire, the sole BNP candidate John Moore took 30 votes (0.6%).

Amid the UKIP disaster in Kent, where they lost every single seat, the BNP polled modestly – even in Swanley, where there was no UKIP candidate, BNP candidate Cliff Le May managed only 2.5%, while Ronald Ball polled 1.6% in Dartford NE and Michael Cope 0.9% in Dartford W.

The only racial nationalist result in Wales was in Llangewydd & Brynhyfryd, Bridgend, where the NF’s Adam Lloyd polled 21 votes (3.0%).

Likewise the NF was the only racial nationalist party with a presence in Scotland. Outgoing NF chairman Dave MacDonald polled 29 votes (1.2%) in the Tillydrone, Seaton & Old Aberdeen ward of Aberdeen; his colleague Billy Watson had 10 votes (0.2%) in the Torry & Ferryhill ward.

 

Kevin Bryan (right) about to return as NF Chairman, was the only NF candidate in England, with his colleague Adam Lloyd (left) the only racial nationalist candidate from any party in Wales.

Kevin Bryan (right) about to return as NF Chairman, was the only NF candidate in England, with his colleague Adam Lloyd (left) the only racial nationalist candidate from any party in Wales.

NF chairman Kevin Bryan will be disappointed with his 50 votes (1.6%) in Whitworth & Bacup, Lancashire, where even UKIP only polled 9.6%: the local contest there was dominated by the Tories, who gained this redrawn seat from Labour by just 17 votes. Even before this result H&D understands the NF was likely not to field General Election candidates, having quite reasonably concluded that this fake ‘snap’ election is likely to be dominated by the destruction of UKIP and a voter reaction against Corbyn’s Labour – there will be little time for smaller nationalist parties to develop a campaign.

The only British Democratic Party candidate, Kevan Stafford in Loughborough South, Leicestershire, polled 30 votes (1.1%) in Loughborough South, Leicestershire, a division which was similarly dominated by a close Tory-Labour contest and where UKIP slipped to 3.4%. The difference is that both Mr Bryan and Mr Stafford had actually done some work (unlike most UKIP candidates), so their result was scant reward for serious effort.

There were contrasting results for the two British Resistance candidates in Worcestershire.  Party leader and former BNP organiser Carl Mason polled 11 votes (0.5%) in Nunnery, while his colleague Linda Bell fared better with 39 votes (2.0%) in Gorse Hill & Warndon.

Dr Andrew Emerson, leader of another post-BNP party Patria, polled 21 votes (0.5%) in Chichester W, West Sussex. In a simultaneous by-election for East Wittering ward, Chichester, Dr Emerson polled 18 votes (1.4%).

English Democrat leader Robin Tilbrook was the only county council candidate for his much reduced party, polling 1.7% in Ongar & Rural – an Essex division where UKIP lost two-thirds of their 2013 vote. Elsewhere the headline result for the EDs was in the Greater Manchester mayoral election, where ED candidate Steve Morris with 2.0% finished ahead of the scandal-plagued UKIP rabbi Shneur Odze on 1.9%. Meanwhile the ED mayoral candidate for Cambridgeshire & Peterborough, Stephen Goldspink, polled 1.1%.

 

 

 

 

Nationalist candidates in this year’s elections

ballot box

 

Polls have closed in local elections held today across many parts of the country – with the notable exception of Greater London.  These elections will be seen as a dress rehearsal for next month’s general election, but are likely to be distorted by very low turnouts.

The big losers this week are likely to be UKIP and Labour, with gains for the SNP, Conservatives and Liberal Democrats. Click here for updated results and analysis of the bigger election picture.

There are also a small number of candidates from nationalist parties, as explained in our article on election nominations last month.

 

BNP – 12 candidates

Essex
Halstead – Paul Hooks  0.5%
Heybridge & Tollesbury – Richard Perry  8.2%
Maldon – Trevor Cable  2.4%
Pitsea (2 vacancies) – Paul Borg and Christine Winter  2.1%

Kent
Dartford NE – Ronald Ball 1.6%
Dartford W – Michael Cope  0.9%
Swanley – Cliff Le May 2.5%

Hampshire
Hayling Island – John Moore  0.6%

Lancashire
Nelson E – John Rowe  10.8%
Pendle C – Brian Parker  20.4%

Lincolnshire
Louth S – Robert Ashton  1.5%


National Front – 4 candidates

Aberdeen
Tillydrone, Seaton & Old Aberdeen – Dave MacDonald 1.2%
Torry & Ferryhill – Billy Watson 0.2%

Bridgend
Llangewydd & Brynhyfryd – Adam Lloyd 3.0%

Lancashire
Whitworth & Bacup – Kevin Bryan 1.6%


English Democrats – 4 candidates (we include the EDs in this list because in recent years the party absorbed some former BNP members and therefore included some people who would be regarded by H&D readers as part of our movement; we should however make it clear that none of the candidates below are former BNP members)

Bury
Besses (by-election) – Steve Morris  6.9%

Cambridgeshire & Peterborough
Mayoral election – Stephen Goldspink  1.1%

Essex
Ongar & Rural – Robin Tilbrook  1.7%

Greater Manchester
Mayoral election – Steve Morris  2.0%


British Resistance – 2 candidates

Worcestershire
Gorse Hill & Warndon – Linda Bell 2.0%
Nunnery – Carl Mason 0.5%


British Democratic Party

Leicestershire
Loughborough S – Kevan Stafford  1.1%


Patria

West Sussex
Chichester W – Dr Andrew Emerson  0.5%
(also contesting a simultaneous borough by-election in East Wittering, Chichester1.4%


Independent

Durham
Spennymoor – Pete Molloy  14.8%

Leicestershire
Coalville N – Graham Partner  2.3%

 

UKIP’s rabbi candidate exposed in bizarre scandal

UKIP's Rabbi Shneur Odze (right) canvassing for the party with then leader Nigel Farage.

UKIP’s Rabbi Shneur Odze (right) canvassing for the party with then leader Nigel Farage.

Regular H&D readers will remember the name Shneur Odze.  He’s the rabbi from the fanatically pro-Zionist Lubavitcher sect who has long been influential in UKIP, and is contesting this week’s Greater Manchester mayoral election for Paul Nuttall’s rapidly fading party.

Previous scandals involving Rabbi Odze have included the following:

  1. More than a decade ago while serving as a Tory councillor in Hackney, he was censured and suspended from the council for three months for a serious ‘breach of trust’.
  2. At the start of the mayoral campaign a month ago, he was targeted by Liberal Democrat opponents for his politically incorrect (and religiously motivated) refusal to shake women’s hands.
  3. Just a fortnight ago, the national press reported that Rabbi Odze had burned a copy of the New Testament outside his synagogue.

Now comes what must surely be the fatal blow to Rabbi Odze’s political career.  The Mail on Sunday reports that UKIP’s rabbi has been conducting an affair with a young woman he met via a “bondage and sadomasochism website”, where the rabbi had posed as a Roman Catholic priest.

Full bizarre details of this scandal are described on the Mail on Sunday website.

Shneur Odze (right) with successive UKIP leaders Nigel Farage and Paul Nuttall (left)

Shneur Odze (right) with successive UKIP leaders Nigel Farage and Paul Nuttall (left)

Yet the most shocking aspect is that UKIP has been so desperate to acquire its own ‘Court Jew’, so keen for insurance against accusations of ‘racism’ or links to the BNP/NF, that it has tolerated any amount of disreputable behaviour from Odze, which would surely have led to the dismissal of any other candidate. In February 2014 Dr Fred McGlade resigned as UKIP’s North West regional organiser because the party leadership had refused to back his view that it was inappropriate for Odze to be a candidate.

Indeed UKIP continues to indulge the rabbi.  A party spokesman told the Mail‘s reporter: “This is a personal matter for Mr Odze. He has broken no law, and therefore we have no comment to make.”

As with other Christian Zionists and Friends of Israel, the truly masochistic aspect of this whole saga is UKIP’s persistent and degrading surrender to any and every outrage committed by even the most marginal and perverted representatives of Zionist Jewry.

 

BNP boosted by UKIP’s disappearance in Pendle

ballot-boxes-460_1418302c

Nominations closed on Tuesday for various local elections being held across most of the UK (except London) on May 4th.

As expected there will be very few candidates from traditional nationalist parties, with most interest focused on just how far UKIP declines. In several (especially northern) counties UKIP have lost about half of their candidates.

For example, we now know that UKIP will have 36 candidates in Lancashire this year, compared to 63 last time; similarly in Cumbria the UKIP candidate list is down from 52 to 23; in North Yorkshire down from 48 to 24; in Durham down from 31 to 14; and in Derbyshire down from 54 to 38.  Further south and east the party has more candidates, though weaker in the South West: down from 48 to 24 in Somerset and from 77 to 21 in Cornwall. The biggest decline is in Wiltshire, where UKIP had 54 candidates last time, but only 8 this year.

One early surprise is in Pendle (part of Lancashire County Council) where the BNP will have two candidates, neither of them opposed by UKIP. Long-serving borough councillor Brian Parker faces Conservative, Labour and Liberal Democrat opponents in the Pendle Central division, while his colleague John Rowe has only Labour and Conservative opponents (both Asian) in Nelson East.

Pendle BNP councillor and county council candidate Brian Parker

Pendle BNP councillor and county council candidate Brian Parker

 

 

British Democratic Party candidate Kevin Stafford

British Democratic Party candidate Kevin Stafford

Kevan Stafford of the British Democrats will contest the Loughborough South division of Leicestershire, his party’s sole candidate.

The National Front will have four candidates across the UK: chairman Kevin Bryan is standing in the Whitworth & Bacup division of Lancashire. Unfortunately (like Mr Stafford of the Brit Dems) he has UKIP opposition.

Dave MacDonald (Mr Bryan’s successor as NF chairman) is contesting the Tillydrone, Seaton & Old Aberdeen ward of Aberdeen City Council.  Mr MacDonald is of course already an elected community councillor in the Aberdeen suburb of Garthdee. Also in Aberdeen, the NF’s Billy Watson is contesting the Torry & Ferryhill ward.

Mr MacDonald’s former deputy Adam Lloyd is NF candidate for Llangewydd & Brynhyfryd ward, Bridgend.

Kevin Bryan of the National Front, standing in his home area of Whitworth & Backup, Lancashire

Kevin Bryan of the National Front, standing in his home area of Whitworth & Backup, Lancashire

Three BNP candidates are standing in Kent: former GLA candidate Cliff Le May in Swanley; Ronald Ball in Dartford NE; and Michael Cope in Dartford West.  Mr Le May is the only one without UKIP opposition: bearing in mind UKIP polled almost 20% in Swanley four years ago, he will be hopeful of a good result in their absence.

There are five BNP candidates in Essex (compared to 14 in 2013 and 75 in 2009): former Braintree parliamentary candidate Paul Hooks in Halstead; Paul Borg and Christine Winter in the two-councillor Pitsea division; Richard Perry in Heybridge & Tollesbury; and Trevor Cable in Maldon. The latter two are standing under the label Fighting Unsustainable Housing Because We Care (which the party has successfully used to win parish council seats in the past without mentioning the BNP name).  We don’t yet know whether this time the name BNP will appear on the ballot paper in these two divisions.

British Resistance (the party founded by supporters of ex-UKIP parliamentary candidate Jack Sen) have two candidates in Worcestershire: former BNP organiser Carl Mason in Nunnery; and Linda Bell in Gorse Hill & Warndon.

Former BNP parliamentary candidate Dr Andrew Emerson is Patria candidate for the Chichester West division of West Sussex. Dr Emerson is also contesting a borough council by-election on the same day in East Wittering ward, Chichester.

Robin Tilbrook - is the ED party over?

Robin Tilbrook – is the ED party over?

Following the imprisonment of former party official Steve Uncles for election fraud, English Democrats candidates are notable by their absence. There are no ED candidates in the former stronghold Doncaster – which has an all-out council and mayoral election this year with no ED presence. So far we only know about party leader Robin Tilbrook, standing in his local Essex division Ongar & Rural, plus ED mayoral candidates Steve Morris in Greater Manchester and Stephen Goldspink in Cambridgeshire and Peterborough. Steve Morris is also contesting a by-election in Besses ward, Bury.

Robert Ashton is BNP candidate for the Louth South division of Lincolnshire, while John Moore is contesting the Hayling Island division of Hampshire.

Former Liverpool BNP organiser Pete Molloy is standing as an independent in the Spennymoor division of Durham (technically a unitary authority rather than a county council). Despite this being the home of party leader Adam Walker, there are no BNP candidates in Durham, nor in Cumbria where the party’s head office is located.

Further news of candidates and campaigns will be posted as we get it. So far H&D believes that the BNP has 12 county council candidates in total, compared to 92 at the last county elections in 2013.

According to H&D‘s (unofficial) calculation, UKIP have 1,037 candidates for the county councils this year: that’s down from 1,494 last time. There are also six unitary authorities that are directly comparable, having elections both in 2013 and this year.  In those six councils combined, UKIP has 85 candidates this year, compared to 242 last time.

There has been a real UKIP collapse in three unitary council areas – Cornwall (from 77 candidates to 21), Wiltshire (from 54 to 8), and Shropshire (from 29 to 9).
By contrast in several South Eastern or Eastern counties UKIP has maintained pretty solid slates: 69 in Kent, 60 in West Sussex, 59 in Essex, 57 in Surrey and 54 in Norfolk.
NOTE: An earlier version of this article incorrectly stated that former Liverpool BNP organiser Pete Molloy was at one time briefly a member of British Voice. We apologise for this error.

Lib Dems play race card against UKIP candidate

Shneur Odze (right) with successive UKIP leaders Nigel Farage and Paul Nuttall (left)

Shneur Odze (right) with successive UKIP leaders Nigel Farage and Paul Nuttall (left)

Shneur Odze – Orthodox Jewish rabbi and UKIP candidate for the first Greater Manchester mayoral election on 4th May 2017 – is once again in trouble because his religious practices clash with political correctness.

More than three years ago when Rabbi Odze (a member of the Lubavitcher Jewish sect) was on the UKIP slate for North West England at the European Parliamentary election, he made national headlines because Orthodox Jewish “religious modesty” laws forbid him to have physical contact with women. Dr Fred McGlade resigned as UKIP’s North West regional organiser in February 2014 because he felt it was inappropriate for Odze to be a candidate.  The national UKIP leadership – cynically aware that having Odze on the ticket might help them distance their party from the “far right” took the rabbi’s side, and Dr McGlade quit the party.

Last weekend the issue was raised again by Liberal Democrat mayoral candidate Jane Brophy, who complained that Odze refused to shake her hand at a hustings event – not because he objects to Lib Dems, but because he refuses on principle to shake hands with women.

Ms Brophy said:
“I think if you’re standing for a position then religion shouldn’t come into it. I should be treated equally as a woman, as a candidate, as everybody here.”

Perhaps a more serious objection to Rabbi Odze standing as a candidate is that when serving as a Tory councillor in Hackney in 2004, he was censured and suspended from the council for three months after removing a sack of electoral registration forms from the Town Hall and delivering them to a local newspaper in what he claimed was a stunt to reveal poor security. His suspension followed failure to complete a supervised ethical training programme.

The panel censuring Odze commented:
“The evidence indicates that Councillor Odze was, at the least in part, motivated by a wish to compromise the Mayoral election. The evidence suggests that Councillor Odze was aware that what he was doing was wrong, that he was misusing confidential information and that his actions likely to bring his office into disrepute. …Cllr Odze undermined public confidence in the Council and he encouraged a member of staff to breach their contract of employment by co-opting them to assist him in this plan.
As stated above the breach of trust involved in the incident was such as to go to the heart of the relationship between Councillor Odze and the Council. It is difficult to imagine a more serious case being referred back to the Council for local determination.”

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