Political establishment humiliated in Bavarian election

Horst Seehofer (right) with Chancellor Angela Merkel: the ruling CSU was rejected by Bavarian voters yesterday after Seehofer’s inconsistent stance on immigration

The latest in a series of historic defeats for Europe’s political establishment saw German Chancellor Angela Merkel’s partners in the Christian Social Union (CSU) fall to a humilating defeat in the Bavarian regional elections.

Ever since the creation of Bismarck’s Germany in 1871 Bavaria has had a unique position as a Catholic region in a majority-Protestant state and has almost always been ruled by Catholic-conservative parties. In postwar arrangements that grew out of Anglo-American military occupation, the Christian Democrats (CDU) are the main conservative party in fifteen of Germany’s sixteen regions or länder, while the CSU operates as the CDU’s Catholic partner in Bavaria.

CSU leader Horst Seehofer is Interior Minister in Merkel’s cabinet, and for more than a year he has been trying to distance himself from her disastrous immigration policies. However Bavaria’s voters saw through Seehofer’s inconsistency: if he really disagreed so much with Merkel’s determination to admit hordes of migrants, he should have split the CDU-CSU alliance and brought down the government. Seehofer cannot continue to serve in such a senior government role, then when it suits him avoid responsibility for government policy.

Seehofer’s CSU polled its worst result since 1950, down from 47.6% to 37.2%, finishing eighteen seats short of a majority.

Alternative für Deutschland (AfD – Alternative for Germany) – the anti-immigration party that was created just after the previous Bavarian elections in 2013 – achieved 10.2% and will have 22 seats in the new Bavarian parliament (Landtag). AfD now has members in every regional parliament except Hesse (the region that includes Frankfurt), where the newly-created party narrowly missed out at the September 2013 Landtag election, polling 4.1%, below the 5% threshold required to obtain seats. AfD is confident of winning seats at the next election in Hesse, which is on October 28th. Opinion polls suggest AfD’s Hesse vote will be between 10% and 14%.

 

Since there is no chance of the CSU agreeing to coalition talks with AfD, the ruling party will now seek a deal with the so-called ‘Free Voters’ (FW), a loosely-knit grouping of regionalist parties that will have a shopping list of demands representing particular local interests. FW’s platform is anti-immigration, but not so strongly as AfD, and their support can probably by bought by CSU concessions on specific issues (e.g. opposition to a third runway at Munich’s international airport).

The big question know is whether this latest electoral humiliation will signal the end for Angela Merkel. Armin Gastl, CSU leader in the central Munich constituency, said: “Voters are abandoning us chiefly because of Merkel. I hope she will step down—she is a woman of the past, not a woman of the future. This is the twilight of the chancellor.”

 

Lewisham East parliamentary by-election: the end of civic nationalism?

David Kurten, former UKIP leadership candidate humiliated in Lewisham by-election

Yesterday’s parliamentary by-election in the SE London constituency of Lewisham East was another tragi-comic episode in the slow death of the United Kingdom Independence Party.

Under the leadership of Nigel Farage, UKIP won more votes and seats than any other party at the 2014 European Parliamentary elections, ending up with 24 MEPs, though never gaining more than two MPs in the House of Commons. The party was primarily responsible for forcing then Conservative Prime Minister David Cameron to concede a referendum on Britain’s membership of the European Union, resulting in the historic Brexit vote of 2016.

But that was the beginning of the end for UKIP. Structural problems and ideological confusion (already analysed in several issues of H&D well before 2016) were never properly addressed even under Farage’s leadership, and since his departure immediately after the referendum the party has been scarred by factional infighting and incompetent leadership.

Yesterday was merely the latest demonstration of UKIP’s desperate state. Their by-election candidate was one of their highest profile and most experienced performers, half-caste London Assembly member David Kurten, but he finished a poor sixth with only 380 votes (1.7%), behind not only the big three parties and the Greens, but also behind the Women’s Equality Party!

Tess Culnane – polled more votes in a single Lewisham ward than UKIP managed yesterday across the entire seven-ward constituency of Lewisham East

To put this into context, H&D readers should remember that in 2002 BNP local election candidates Barry Roberts and Tess Culnane polled more votes in a single ward of Lewisham East than Mr Kurten managed yesterday across the entire constituency (which contains seven wards)!

The only good news for UKIP is that Kurten finished ahead of his former colleague Anne Marie Waters. She had been UKIP candidate for this constituency at the 2015 General Election, polling a very creditable 3,886 votes (9.1%) in what were admittedly far better times nationwide for the party. After an acrimonious leadership election last year, Ms Waters quit and with the help of former BNP and EDL activists created a breakaway party called the For Britain Movement.

Yesterday Ms Waters finished a poor seventh, with only 266 votes (1.2%). Her only excuse is that Labour called the by-election very quickly after the resignation of the previous MP, so Ms Waters and her campaign team (which included former East London BNP election guru Eddy Butler) had very little time. Yet it must be admitted that the Liberal Democrats also had very little time, yet they succeeded in building a serious bandwagon and advancing to second place: having lost their deposit twelve months ago with only 4.4%, the Lib Dems polled 24.6% yesterday.

Anne Marie Waters on the by-election campaign trail with former BNP election guru Eddy Butler (third left, back row) and an activist team including several former BNP officials and councillors, whose help could not save Ms Waters from a crushing defeat.

The inescapable conclusion is that the Lib Dem message (almost entirely focused on pro-Remain voters) resonated strongly with a certain section of the Lewisham electorate. We know that there is a different section of the Lewisham electorate who respond to nationalist issues, including immigration and law and order, but the Islam-obsessed campaigns of Kurten and Waters failed to resonate similarly among those voters. This was despite Ms Waters’ ally ‘Tommy Robinson’, founder of the EDL, getting himself jailed during the campaign and creating worldwide publicity. Proof yet again that there is a big difference between Facebook likes, or turning out screaming mobs in Whitehall, and the serious grown-up politics of winning votes.

It probably didn’t help that Lewisham is an odd place to bang on about Muslims: the area has many immigration-related problems, but relatively few of the large non-White population here are Muslims.

The third civic nationalist candidate, Massimo DiMambro of the new Democrats & Veterans party, was always going to be overshadowed by the far higher profile and better financed campaigns of Kurten and Walters: he managed only 67 votes (0.3%).

However the Democrats & Veterans party, which is much less Islam-obsessed than either UKIP or For Britain, but takes a strong line on immigration and other nationalist issues, seems to be having more success than Ms Waters’ party in building a network of branches nationwide.

The best bet is that UKIP-style civic nationalism is dying, but when the dust settles Democrats & Veterans might be the one viable civic nationalist party still capable of making a challenge (at least for local council seats).

 

Local Elections 2018: suspended Tory ‘racist’ gains seat

Votes were counted in councils across most of England overnight and today. (click here for full updated list of nationalist results)

So far the best nationalist result was achieved by Dr Jim Lewthwaite of the British Democrats: a very creditable vote in difficult circumstances in Wyke ward, Bradford, defeating both UKIP and the ex-UKIP party Democrats & Veterans.  Jim finished third of seven candidates with 161 votes (5.5%), a substantial advance on the 2.8% he polled in 2014.

Another excellent result (but in this case benefiting from UKIP’s absence) was achieved by former BNP organiser Steven Smith who polled 171 votes (14.8%) to finish third in Brunshaw ward, Burnley.

Joe Owens, a former NF and BNP activist who for several years was Nick Griffin’s bodyguard, was another independent candidate polling well.  Mr Owens stood as an Independent for Kensington & Fairfield ward, Liverpool, finishing third of six candidates with 4.9% of the vote (ahead of the Conservatives and Liberal Democrats).

But another ex-BNP independent, millionaire businessman Paul Cromie, was badly beaten in Queensbury ward, Bradford, where he finished third in a seat which he had held since 2006.

Dr Jim Lewthwaite of the British Democrats achieved the best nationalist result this year

All of the BNP votes so far have been down from the 2014 equivalents, even where candidates were lucky enough to have no UKIP opponent.  In the party’s last remaining London stronghold of SE London, Bexley BNP organiser Michael Jones polled 9.5% (down from 10.2%) with no UKIP opponent in East Wickham ward, and his colleague Pamela Mackie similarly benefited from UKIP’s disappearance, polling 6.5% (down from 8.0%) in Erith ward.

Almost all BNP candidates finished bottom of the poll in their respective areas, but significant exceptions were the brothers John and Dave Clarke, who polled 7.1% and 4.8% in the two New Addington wards of Croydon (where boundary changes make direct comparisons impossible).

Carl Mason, sole council candidate for British Resistance, the party founded by ex-UKIP candidate Jack Sen, polled 17 votes (0.8%) in Nunnery ward, Worcester, up from 0.4% last time. A commendable effort, but it would be unwise for his party to make too much of this doubling in support since 2014!

In the Outer East London borough of Havering, where there were some exceptionally crowded ballot papers due to a profusion of independent and post-UKIP parties, Denise Underwood of the BNP finished 12th of 13 candidates with 123 votes (2.5%) in St Andrew’s, while Kevin Layzell of the National Front had the worst luck of any nationalist this year, up against a full UKIP slate in addition to many other parties and independents: he finished 18th of 18 with 50 votes (1.3%). Meanwhile the NF’s former deputy chairman Graham Williamson, once a leading figure in Patrick Harrington’s Third Way faction, who has now reinvented himself as a multiracialist, was easily re-elected in South Hornchurch as an independent residents councillor.  His former Third Way colleague Dave Durant was similarly re-elected as an independent residents councillor for Rainham & Wennington. Their group has six councillors, but apart from Williamson and Durant has no connection to any nationalist movement (in fact one of their group is an Afro-Caribbean).

NF veteran Richard Edmonds was (like his Havering colleague Kevin Layzell) up against a full UKIP slate, so it was no great surprise when he polled 1.7%, but the two NF votes in North West England were more disappointing, as they had no UKIP opponents. H&D understands that partly for business reasons, party chairman Kevin Bryan was unable to leaflet his ward, and he paid the price, polling only 4.6% in Irwell ward, Rossendale, where he had managed 10.2% in 2016 and 16% in 2012.

Suspended Tory Antony Mullen was elected in Barnes ward, Sunderland

Perhaps the most sensational early result was in the former Labour bastion of Sunderland.

Antony Mullen had been suspended as Conservative candidate for Barnes ward, Sunderland, after allegations of ‘racist’ and ‘sexist’ social media posts.  He remained on the ballot paper as official Conservative candidate despite being disowned by the party, as it was too late legally to remove him.

H&D are delighted to confirm that Mr Mullen gained the Barnes ward seat from Labour tonight, in one of the first results to be declared.  Clearly Sunderland’s voters do not share politically correct obsessions.

Elsewhere in Sunderland (where UKIP has now completely disappeared) the first result for ex-UKIP leadership candidate Anne Marie Waters’s new party For Britain was very disappointing.  Despite facing no competition from UKIP or any eurosceptic / civic nationalist party, Andrew Cox of For Britain polled only 6.5% in the Washington North ward, finishing fourth of five candidates.  This is a ward where UKIP polled 31% at the equivalent election four years ago.

The results so far have been a disaster for Ms Waters and a demonstration that the future of post-UKIP politics does not lie with the Islam-obsessed wing of civic nationalism. So far it appears that Democrats & Veterans (DVP) might have a better claim than For Britain to take over what remains of the UKIP vote. In Cross Gates & Whinmoor ward, Leeds, For Britain had disowned their candidate following yet another social media ‘scandal’, and they finished well behind not only UKIP but also DVP. In another Leeds ward, Armley, For Britain finished ahead of DVP but both were near the bottom of the poll; while in Bramley & Stanningley (where they had no rivals for the post-UKIP vote) For Britain expected to make an impact but came last with 9.3%.

Another Leeds ward where For Britain had no competition from UKIP or DVP was Farnley & Wortley, but here they polled only 3.0%; in Garforth & Swillington the result was worse still: bottom of the poll with 2.0%; and a miserable night for Anne Marie Waters’ supposedly strongest branch was completed in Otley & Yeadon with 2.8%.

In Sandwell – the Black Country council which For Britain’s main target area – their candidate finished a distant third in Great Barr with Yew Tree ward polling 8.8% despite having no UKIP opponent.  (UKIP had polled 33.6% here in 2014.)  Similarly in Newton ward, again with no UKIP opponent, For Britain were bottom of the poll with 10.2%, compared to UKIP’s 2014 vote of 30.1%. The only crumb of comfort for Ms Waters was in Charlemont with Grove Vale ward, where For Britain with 5.2% finished slightly ahead of the dying UKIP on 4.4%. Yet even the two parties combined support today is less than a third of the old UKIP vote in this ward (33.6%).

In Castle ward, Hastings, another area where UKIP has disappeared, the two rival post-UKIP parties each contested Castle ward: DVP finished with 3.2% to For Britain’s 2.6%.

Tom Commis (second left) with fellow Burnley UKIP councillor Alan Hosker, was a rare UKIP winner today

In Brookfield ward, Preston, where the H&D team had a pint or two earlier this evening, UKIP’s vote collapsed from 33% in 2014 to 12.4% today – another indication of what is sure to be a nationwide disaster for UKIP this year.  Similarly in the editor’s home ward of Ribbleton, UKIP’s vote collapsed from 32.7% to 9.8%. One of UKIP’s highest profile members, West Midlands MEP Bill Etheridge, lost his council seat in Sedgley ward, Dudley.  UKIP were wiped out across this borough, where they had won the largest share of the vote and seven seats in 2014. Mr Etheridge said he would quit politics unless UKIP changed its leader before the next elections. He is currently facing disciplinary action because of his attendance at an alleged pro-Putin forum in the Crimea last month.

So far UKIP has won only three council seats nationwide, compared to 166 in 2014. Only one of these three was a previous UKIP seat: Alvaston ward, Derby, where energetic campaigner Alan Graves won a superbly increased majority, in stark contrast to his party’s woeful performance nationwide. In nearby Boulton ward, UKIP sensationally ousted Ranjit Banwait, the Labour leader of Derby City Council.

The third UKIP winner was Tom Commis, who gained a seat from Labour in the former BNP stronghold of Hapton with Park, Burnley.  Cllr Commis joins his UKIP colleague Alan Hosker, who is both a borough and county councillor for the same area.  Labour’s Joanne Greenwood is her party’s only survivor in Hapton, and will surely be nervous when she comes up for re-election next year, even if Burnley is the only UKIP branch left in the country by then!

Only one of the sixteen Thurrock Independents (ex-UKIP councillors who had quit the party in January, kept his seat – that was MEP Tim Aker, who for the time being still represents UKIP in Brussels but was opposed by UKIP in this week’s council election.

The Labour leadership’s problems with alleged ‘antisemitism’ was reflected in one early result, where Labour lost Kersal ward, Salford, one of the most Jewish wards in England.  The rest of Salford has far fewer Jews, so the Kersal result will have no effect on Labour’s control of the city. A more significant Jewish landslide against Labour was in the London Borough of Barnet, where loss of Jewish support is likely to prevent Labour gaining control.

Meanwhile in the Lancashire borough of Pendle, outgoing BNP councillor Brian Parker had endorsed the Labour candidate in his old Marsden ward, but it was won by the Tory – and this was enough to give the Tories control of Pendle council after they  readmitted a councillor who had been suspended last year for a ‘racist’ Facebook post.

 

Nationalist candidates at 2018 local elections

Tess Culnane, BNP candidate for Downham ward, Lewisham

Regular H&D readers will not be surprised to see only a small number of nationalist candidates at this year’s local elections, even though the London borough councils were up for election, which usually means a big increase in candidates from a normal year. We are in a transitional period, with UKIP in terminal decline, but its remnants still blocking the way for the re-emergence of a large scale nationalist effort.

The big story was the retirement of long serving BNP councillor Brian Parker, who stood down in Marsden ward, Pendle. There was no new BNP candidate to replace Mr Parker, so the party gave up its last borough council seat. All bar one of the remaining BNP candidates this year were in London, and almost all finished bottom of the poll, the main exceptions being brothers John and Dave Clarke who achieved credible results in Croydon, and Tess Culnane in Downham ward, Lewisham, who defeated a full slate from the ex-UKIP party Democrats & Veterans.

The highest BNP vote was for Michael Jones in East Wickham ward, Bexley, who had no UKIP or similar opponent, and the best nationalist vote overall was for ex-BNP organiser Steven Smith in Brunshaw ward, Burnley, who similarly had no UKIP or post-UKIP opposition.  Arguably the best performance however was by Dr Jim Lewthwaite in Wyke ward, Bradford, who doubled his vote and finished ahead of both UKIP and the breakaway ex-UKIP party Democrats & Veterans.

The list below shows the result for every nationalist candidate that we know of, and will be updated if further information arrives.

see also report and analysis here

BNP: 16 candidates

London Borough of Barking & Dagenham
Eastbrook – Tony McKay – 158 votes (5,2%, -1.2) – 8th of 8
Goresbrook – Bede Smith – 246 votes (10.8%, -3.1) – 7th of 7

London Borough of Bexley
East Wickham – Michael Jones – 398 votes (9.5%, -0.7) – 7th of 7
Erith – Pamela Mackie – 154 votes (6.5%, -2.5) – 5th of 5
Falconwood & Welling – Jaymie McCoy – 101 votes (1.9%, -7.0) – 12th of 12
Northumberland Heath – Robert Howard – 160 votes (5.1%, -7.0) – 6th of 6
Sidcup – John Brooks – 130 votes (2.6%, -1.5), 12th of 13

London Borough of Croydon
New Addington N – John Clarke – 142 votes (7.1%) – 5th of 8
New Addington S – Dave Clarke – 131 votes (4.8%) – 6th of 8
Selsdon & Addington Village – Michael Collard – 42 votes (1.1%) – 9th of 9

London Borough of Ealing
Northolt West End – David Furness – 180 votes (4.5%, -3.7) – 10th of 13

Royal Borough of Greenwich
Coldharbour & New Eltham – Cliff Adams – 123 votes (2.8%, -5.3) – 12th of 12

London Borough of Havering
Saint Andrew’s – Denise Underwood – 123 votes (2.5%) – 12th of 13

London Borough of Hillingdon
West Drayton – Vincent Evans – 143 votes (3.6%) – 7th of 9

London Borough of Lewisham
Downham – Tess Culnane – 98 votes (2.9%) – 12th of 15

Exeter City Council
St Thomas – Chris Stone – 34 votes (1.2%, -0.2) – 5th of 5

 

National Front: 5 candidates

London Borough of Havering
Gooshays – Kevin Layzell – 50 votes (1.4%) – 18th of 18

London Borough of Sutton
St Helier – Richard Edmonds – 49 votes (1.7%) – 13th of 13

Calderdale Metropolitan Borough
Todmorden – Chris Jackson – 98 votes (2.7%) – 5th of 5

Rossendale Borough Council
Irwell – Kevin Bryan – 56 votes (4.6%) – 3rd of 3

Amber Valley Borough Council
Langley Mill & Aldercar – Tim Knowles – 30 votes (2.7%) – 4th of 4

 

British Democratic Party: 1 candidate

Bradford City Council
Wyke – Dr Jim Lewthwaite – 161 votes (5.5%, +2.7) – 3rd of 7

 

British Resistance: 1 candidate

Worcester City Council
Nunnery – Carl Mason – 17 votes (0.8%, +0.4) – 5th of 5

 

Independent nationalist candidates

Burnley Borough Council
Brunshaw – Steven Smith – 171 votes (14.8%) – 3rd of 4

Liverpool City Council
Kensington & Fairfield – Joe Owens – 114 votes (4.9%) – 3rd of 6

Manchester City Council
Crumpsall – John Rowe – 138 votes (3.4%) – 10th of 11

 

English Democrats: 4 candidates
(we include the EDs in this list because in recent years the party absorbed some former BNP members and therefore included some people who would be regarded by H&D readers as part of our movement; we should however make it clear that none of the candidates below are former BNP members)

Sheffield City Region Mayoralty
David Allen – 14,547 votes (5.6%) – 6th of 7

Barnsley Metropolitan Borough
Rockingham – Kevin Riddiough – 235 votes (11.1%, +8.7) – 3rd of 4

Bury Metropolitan Borough
Besses – Steve Morris – 169 votes (7.1%, -9.4) – 3rd of 5

Salford City Council
Swinton South – Craig Holmes – 163 votes (7.4%) – 3rd of 6

 

New “anti-fascist” party stumbles at first fence

For Britain founder Anne Marie Waters (left) promoting the launch of her earlier anti-Islam group PEGIDA alongside the EDL founder Tommy Robinson (centre) and Liberty GB’s Paul Weston

Former UKIP leadership candidate Anne-Marie Waters has succeeded in winning lots of publicity for her new party, the For Britain Movement, which she describes as “anti-fascist”.  According to its website, “For Britain is a party for everyone except racists, fascists, Marxists, collectivists and identitarians.”

Unfortunately Ms Waters’ “party for everyone” has failed to recruit many candidates for its first electoral outing. They have six candidates in Leeds, three in Sandwell, and one each in Hartlepool, Sunderland, Hart, Plymouth, Hastings and the London Borough of Bromley.

A far less publicised rival splinter group from UKIP – the ‘Democrats and Veterans Party’ founded by former leadership candidate John Rees-Evans – has succeeded in recruiting far more candidates than Ms Waters, despite only being registered as a party since the end of January.  There are more than forty ‘Democrats and Veterans’ candidates for various English councils, plus mayoral candidates in two London boroughs, while For Britain seems to have only fifteen candidates nationwide.

Even the Thurrock Independents – another UKIP breakaway who, as their name suggests, are only contesting Thurrock Borough Council – have more candidates than Ms Waters. It seems that Islam-obsessed “anti-fascism” has a very limited electoral appeal.

 

BNP gives up its last council seat without a fight

Pendle BNP councillor Brian Parker is stepping down this year, and the party is not putting up a candidate in his Marsden ward – the last BNP council seat in the country

Today the BNP surrendered its last council seat without a fight.  Just a few years ago the party was hitting the headlines with council victories in many areas of England, and even two Members of the European Parliament.  Yet today the press didn’t even notice when the last BNP council seat – Marsden ward, Pendle – was given up.

Nominations closed this afternoon for the local council elections, and it can now be confirmed that long-serving Cllr Brian Parker will not be defending his seat.  No one can blame Cllr Parker for retiring: he has put in a big effort sustained over twelve years, first gaining the seat from Labour in 2006, then winning re-election in 2010 and 2014.  He also contested the Pendle Central division four times at Lancashire County Council elections, most recently last year, and was parliamentary candidate for Pendle at last year’s general election.

The truth is that the BNP has collapsed around Mr Parker and a handful of other nationalist true-believers, and its national leadership is now devoted to hunting financial legacies rather than genuine political activity. The six surviving BNP candidates so far declared (all but one in London) are: David Furness in Northolt West End ward, Ealing; Vincent Evans in West Drayton ward, Hillingdon; Denise Underwood in Saint Andrews ward, Havering; Bede Smith in Goresbrook ward, Barking & Dagenham; Tony McKay in Eastbrook ward, Barking & Dagenham; and Chris Stone in St Thomas ward, Exeter.

Elsewhere veteran nationalist Richard Edmonds will be National Front candidate for St Helier ward, Sutton, unfortunately facing a full slate of three UKIP opponents, as is Kevin Layzell in Gooshays ward, Havering.  NF chairman Kevin Bryan is more lucky, facing no UKIP opposition in Irwell ward, Rossendale where he is in a three-way fight against Lab and Con. Similarly Chris Jackson as NF candidate for Todmorden ward, Calderdale, has no UKIP opponent.

NF chairman Kevin Bryan is contesting his home ward of Irwell, Rossendale

Dr Jim Lewthwaite, chairman of the British Democratic Party, will be British Democrats candidate for Wyke ward, Bradford – the sole nationalist candidate in a city which once had four BNP councillors.

Former BNP, NF and EFP candidate Steven Smith (architect of the BNP’s success in Burnley sixteen years ago) is standing as Independent candidate for Brunshaw ward, Burnley, where he has no UKIP opposition.

Controversial nationalist author Joe Owens is Independent candidate for Kensington & Fairfield ward, Liverpool.

The almost extinct English Democrats have a candidate in Salford, yet another city where a once strong BNP branch has completely disappeared.  Probably the most high profile ED campaign will be for the new Sheffield City Region mayoralty, where David Allen is ED candidate.  This new region includes Doncaster, where the EDs won the old mayoralty in 2009. Another longstanding ED Kevin Riddiough will again be contesting Rockingham ward, Barnsley, and similarly Steve Morris will again contest Besses ward, Bury.

In most of the country the breaking news is of UKIP decline and in many cases disappearance, most notably in their former stronghold of Thurrock, where the entire UKIP group of councillors (including MEP Tim Aker) has left the party.  These councillors will be standing for re-election as ‘Thurrock Independents’, while the official UKIP has mustered only five candidates across the borough.

There are no UKIP candidates in Oldham, where the party is failing to defend the two seats gained in 2014.  Former UKIP councillor Warren Bates is standing for re-election as an Independent in the Failsworth West ward. Another old BNP stronghold where UKIP has now completely disappeared is Barking & Dagenham.  It is rare this year to find a council with a full UKIP slate of candidates for every ward: two examples are Derby and Swindon. In the whole of Birmingham there is only one UKIP candidate, though at least one ex-UKIP parliamentary candidate is standing as an independent.  Former UKIP leadership has candidate John Rees-Evans now runs a ‘Democrats and Veterans’ party which has candidates for several councils this year, including several in Yorkshire: Bradford, Leeds, Barnsley, Harrogate, Wakefield, Kirklees, and Hull.

So far it looks as though Mr Rees-Evans’s party will have substantially more candidates than another newly registered party led by another former UKIP leadership candidate. The ‘For Britain Movement’ created by Anne-Marie Waters on an anti-Islam platform is contesting the Washington North ward in Sunderland, another area where the UKIP branch seems to have collapsed. The strongest For Britain branch appears to be in Leeds, where they are contesting six city council wards. This should give them a chance of some decent results, because following boundary changes the entire Leeds council is being elected this year, with voters in each ward having three votes. Usually this gives a big boost to small parties (as with Burnley BNP in 2002).

There are seven UKIP candidates in Leeds, and only one ward (Crossgates & Whinmoor) has both UKIP and For Britain.  Another of the few areas where For Britain is making progress is the Black Country borough of Sandwell, where there are three For Britain candidates and only one UKIP (the latter has For Britain opposition in Charlemont with Grove Vale ward).

A For Britain candidate is also standing in Yateley East ward, Hart.  On the opposite side of the European debate, another new party seems to be having the same marginal impact as Ms Waters.  The self-styled ‘centrist’ and pro-Remain party Renew, founded by former anti-terrorist officer Chris Coghlan, has twelve candidates so far: eight in its main London base of Wandsworth; two in North Tyneside; and one each in Ealing and Hounslow.

H&D will report further on the 2018 local council elections as nominations are announced.

p.s.: Any nationalists feeling a bit depressed by the state of our movement should spare a thought for the lavishly funded ‘anti-fascists’ of Hope not Hate, whose ‘expert’ election article today predicts that Anne-Marie Waters and For Britain will have Rotherham as one of their target areas in this year’s election.  In fact there are no council elections in Rotherham this year (not until 2020). We do hope none of that Soros money has been spent on special anti-fascist leaflets for Rotherham…

German nationalists win Bundestag seats with record high vote

AfD candidate for Chancellor Alexander Gauland has led the party into the Bundestag for the first time with more than 80 MPs

The German anti-immigration party Alternative for Deutschland (AfD – Alternative for Germany) has won seats for the first time in the country’s national parliament, the Bundestag, polling 12.6% of the nationwide vote.

German general elections are a combination of Westminster-style constituencies (where an MP is elected first-past-the-post) and a proportional list-based system.  Voters choose both an MP for their locality, and express a preference for a party. After each directly elected MP has been chosen, the rest of the Bundestag is drawn from various party lists so that its final composition matches the proportion of votes for each party (with a threshold of 5% of the national vote, below which a party gets no MPs at all).[spacer height=”20px”]

Frauke Petry, co-leader of Alternative for Germany, has won her constituency in Saxony and will be one of a projected 88 AfD MPs.

[spacer height=”20px”]AfD’s co-leader Frauke Petry has won her constituency in Saxony, top of the poll with 37.4% and gaining the district from Chancellor Angela Merkel’s ruling CDU.  Two of Mrs Petry’s AfD colleagues in neighbouring Saxony districts were also directly elected – and at 2 a.m. German time came the sensational news that AfD is now the largest party in Saxony as a whole with almost 670,000 votes (27.0%) in this region of former East Germany! At a press conference the morning after this stunning result, Frauke Petry unfortunately distracted from the party’s success by announcing that she would not sit with AfD in the Bundestag. She then walked out of the press conference leaving party colleagues surprised and embarrassed. The party will hope not to be blighted by further displays of political immaturity.

AfD’s 12.6% vote was a significant improvement on polls at the start of the campaign that had put the party below 10%. This will make AfD the third largest party in the Bundestag: they are now projected to have 88 MPs but the precise total will depend detailed calculations not yet complete, due to the electoral system. Conservative Chancellor Merkel and her ex-coalition partners, the social-democratic SPD, have each polled lower than expected. Merkel will now struggle to form a viable coalition government, and will have to enter talks with both the liberal FDP and the Greens.[spacer height=”20px”]

Exit poll shows that AfD is now the most popular party among male voters in the former East Germany

[spacer height=”20px”]Merkel’s CDU/CSU polled 33.0%, down 9% from the previous election in 2013.  The SPD was second on 20.5%, down 5.2% and a record postwar low, despite having enjoyed a brief boost in the polls earlier this year. AfD were third with 12.6%, up 7.9%. The liberal FDP (on various occasions postwar coalition partners with either CDU/CSU or SPD) will be back in the Bundestag with 10.7% (up 5.9%) after losing all their MPs in 2013. The Left Party (ex-communists and left-wing former SPD members) managed 9.2% (up 0.6%) and the Greens are similarly almost unchanged from last time with 8.9% (up 0.5%).[spacer height=”20px”]

Chancellor Angela Merkel’s pro-immigration policies have cost her party millions of votes

[spacer height=”20px”]A few days ago in one of his final campaign speeches, AfD’s lead candidate Alexander Gauland said that Germans had the right to be proud of their soldiers’ record in the two 20th century world wars:

“If the French are rightly proud of their emperor and the Britons of Nelson and Churchill, we have the right to be proud of the achievements of the German soldiers in two world wars.”

Many journalists worldwide have been writing that AfD will be the first “far right” party to gain seats in the postwar German Bundestag.  However the Guardian’s Berlin correspondent Philip Oltermann points out that at the very first Bundestag election in 1949 the Deutsche Rechtspartei (DRP – German Right Party), sometimes known as the German Conservative Party (DKP), won five seats.

This party suffered various splits, with some of its MPs joining the Socialist Reich Party (SRP) which was banned in 1952.[spacer height=”20px”]

Ace fighter pilot and postwar nationalist politician Hans-Ulrich Rudel (third from left) at a social event in Munich, September 1968, with (left to right) Freda Jones, Ursula Rudel, John Tyndall, Beryl Cheetham, Savitri Devi and Joe Jones

Some others then joined the Deutsche Reichspartei (German Reich Party, or German Empire Party, confusingly also abbreviated as DRP) which developed links with Sir Oswald Mosley and included Luftwaffe ace Hans-Ulrich Rudel among its members.  This DRP never won Bundestag seats, though did win representation in the Rhineland-Palatinate Landtag.
 
The NPD of course never won a Bundestag seat, though again winning various Landtag seats, and polling a peak of 3.6% at the 1969 Bundestag election.
 
The Deutsche Partei (German Party, DP) was a more respectable version of nationalism and had Bundestag seats from 1949 to 1961: indeed the DP was a coalition partner with the conservative CDU and CSU until 1960.
 
In 1960 the DP merged with the GB/BHE (a party representing Germans expelled from the eastern territories) to form the All-German Party (GDP), but this new merged party failed to win Bundestag seats at the 1961 election, and quickly faded, with several of its leading activists co-founding the new NPD in 1964.
 
Schönhuber’s Republikaner (Republican) party, which had its big success at the 1989 European election with 6 MEPs, never entered the Bundestag: its best result was 2.1% in 1990.  At the founding of the Republikaner in 1983 as a split from the Bavarian conservative CSU, they had two Bundestag MPs (who had been elected as CSU) but by the time of the next Bundestag election in 1987 these two had quit the party and Schönhuber decided the party was too weak to contest those elections.

Thirty years on, German politics has been transformed. Today’s front pages convey the liberal establishment’s horror.[spacer height=”20px”]

Dying UKIP prepares for leadership contest

David Coburn (left) with former UKIP leader Nigel Farage

David Coburn (left) with former UKIP leader Nigel Farage

[spacer height=”20px”]The United Kingdon Independence Party continues its recent record of embarrassment, stumbling around in search of credible leadership, following last week’s disastrous General Election results.

Today David Coburn, UKIP’s sole MEP in Scotland announced that he would contest the leadership vacated on Friday by Paul Nuttall, who had been in the top job for just over six months. Mr Coburn is an ally of former leader Nigel Farage, and has said that if Farage decides to return he will not stand against him.

On the same day that he expressed his interest in the party leadership, Mr Coburn (who is openly homosexual) received unwelcome publicity in the Daily Record, Scotland’s best-selling newspaper.

The Record published its investigation of Scottish Dawn, described as successor to the nationalist youth movement National Action which is banned under the Terrorism Act.

Today's Daily Record front page

Today’s Daily Record front page

[spacer height=”20px”]Ruaidhri McKim (a Scottish Dawn activist) was secretly filmed discussing his links to National Action and the Polish nationalist organisation NOP, as well as his membership of UKIP.  Mr McKim said:
I was in UKIP for a while. Then after Brexit I just left because I didn’t see a point in it anymore. There’s lots of radical people within it, but no one with any position is a radical. UKIP Scotland was fucked man. I’ve been drunk with David Coburn – he’s really good fun. He’s a fun guy.

Mr Coburn commented:
I think this chap is grandstanding and blethering and I am surprised you are taking him remotely seriously. I am homosexual, speak Arabic and various other languages and I have spent my entire life fighting ignorance, racial and sexual intolerance. Print this crap and I will sue this individual, you and your organ.

As UKIP continues to flounder, the ugly face of British Conservatism was exposed today when it emerged that the managing director of Jennings Racing (Britain’s largest independent bookmaking chain which trades under the name Jenningsbet) had emailed 500 staff before polling day warning them that only the Conservative Party would resist gambling reforms.

British gamblers lost £1.8bn last year on the notorious Fixed Odds Terminals

British gamblers lost £1.8bn last year on the notorious Fixed Odds Terminals

[spacer height=”20px”]Labour and the Liberal Democrats had proposed reducing the maximum stake on the notorious fixed-odds betting terminals (FOBTs) from £100 to £2.  FOBTs are notorious for fleecing gambling addicts who pump the entire contents of their wallets and purses into these terminals which have proliferated on British high streets.

Jenningsbet has 400 terminals spread across 100 high street shops.  Each machine brings in an average of £53,000 per year, with Britain’s gambling addicts losing a record £1.8bn on FOBTs in the year to last September. Jenningsbet is co-owned by three Jewish brothers, the Pears family whose ancestor changed his name from Schleicher on arriving in Britain from Austria in the 19th century.

The Pears family are noted for their philanthropy to Jewish charities and Holocaust education, having established the Pears Institute for the Study of Antisemitism at Birkbeck College, London.

Gambling and property tycoon Trevor Pears, whose company warned its staff that only the Tories woulod resist reform of gambling laws

Gambling and property tycoon Trevor Pears, whose company warned its staff that only the Tories would resist reform of gambling laws

 

BNP and other nationalist votes

Pendle BNP councillor and county council candidate Brian Parker

Pendle BNP councillor and parliamentary candidate Brian Parker

An extraordinary General Election that wiped out Theresa May’s Conservative majority also saw the electoral eclipse of the BNP and the English Democrats, none of whose candidates even came close to saving their deposits.

Brian Parker – the BNP’s sole remaining borough councillor – polled only 718 votes (1.6%) in Pendle, his party’s main target seat.

BNP chairman Adam Walker managed a slightly better result in Bishop Auckland, but was bottom of the poll with 991 votes (2.3%).

Meanwhile the English Democrats’ results were even worse, collapsing from an already low base. As the SNP lost support north of the border it appears that the Union is safe, and logically ‘English’ nationalism has lost relevance.[spacer height=”20px”]

BNP results

Bexleyheath & Crayford
Peter Finch 0.6%

Bishop Auckland
Adam Walker 2.3%

Charnwood
Stephen Denham 0.6% (-0.4)

Dagenham & Rainham
Paul Sturdy 0.5% (+0.2)

Eltham
John Clarke 1.6%

Hornchurch & Upminster
David Furness 0.7% (+0.3)

Maldon [listed as ‘Fighting Unsustainable Housing’: BNP name not on ballot]
Richard Perry 0.5%

Old Bexley & Sidcup
Michael Jones 0.7% (+0.2)

Pendle
Brian Parker 1.6%

South Basildon & East Thurrock
Paul Borg 0.8%

——–

English Democrat candidates

Barnsley Central
Stephen Morris 0.5% (-0.8)

Barnsley East
Kevin Riddiough 0.7% (-0.4)

Bradford South
Thérèse Hirst 0.9%

Clacton
Robin Tilbrook 0.7%

Doncaster North
David Allen 0.9% (-0.3)

Holborn & St Pancras
Janus Polenceus 0.2%

NE Cambridgeshire
Stephen Goldspink 0.5%

[spacer height=”20px”]

Paul Nuttall (left) has succeeded Nigel Farage as UKIP leader following a period of internal turmoil. He claims that UKIP will serious challenge Labour in Northern England.

Paul Nuttall (left) succeeded Nigel Farage last year as UKIP leader following a period of internal turmoil. He resigned today after electoral humiliation,

Meanwhile those racial nationalists who believed that UKIP offered us some hope must think again after the party suffered a series of crushing defeats, ending with the resignation of humiliated leader Paul Nuttall.

Notable UKIP disasters included Clacton (formerly their sole parliamentary seat until Douglas Carswell’s resignation) where UKIP’s vote fell from 44.4% to 7.6%; Thanet South (where re-elected Conservative MP Craig Mackinlay still faces criminal charges for fraudulent overspending during his defeat of Nigel Farage in 2015) – UKIP vote down from 32.4% to 6.0%; and Boston & Skegness, a key target seat contested by Nuttall himself – UKIP vote down from 33.8% to 7.7%.

The only vaguely credible UKIP result came in Thurrock, where UKIP’s Tim Aker (an MEP from a part-Turkish background) fought a vigorous campaign against pro-Remain Tory MP Jackie Doyle-Price.  However even here the UKIP vote fell from 31.7% to 20.1%. Ms Doyle-Price survived, and Labour pushed UKIP into third place.

 

Tory gamble fails

ballot-boxes-460_1418302c

Early results have confirmed the H&D team’s suspicions that this UK general election would prove a personal disaster for Prime Minister Theresa May.

We shall tomorrow be publishing our analysis of what this means for the racial nationalist movement.  UKIP died today; the promise of “strong and stable” Tory rule has proved illusory. In fact Mrs May’s gamble has been arguably the most disastrous decision in the history of Western democracy. Only a handful of hardcore pro-Brexit constituencies in the Midlands shifted from Labour to Tory: MansfieldNE Derbyshire, Walsall North and Stoke South (the latter a former BNP stronghold where UKIP boosted the Tories by standing aside).

This has proved a disastrous election for the multi-racial, politically correct Scottish National Party, whose former leader Alex Salmond was among several casualties: in fact the only silver lining for the Conservatives is that they will gain several seats from the SNP.  Scottish independence is as dead as UKIP after tonight’s results.  The Union is safe.

Though this might seem an excellent result for Jeremy Corbyn’s Labour, racial nationalists should not despair.

Watch this space for developing news on an extraordinary election!

Meanwhile – sadly – this election confirmed the decline of our existing racial nationalist parties. Even in Pendle the BNP’s Brian Parker – his party’s last remaining borough councillor – managed only 1.6%, though he had no UKIP opponent.

2017 has definitively killed off Prime Minister May and two moribund parties: UKIP and the BNP.

Perhaps the best news of the election for H&D readers is that the Democratic Unionist Party emerges from this election greatly strengthened, with ten MPs in a (probably) hung parliament.

 

Next Page »

  • Find By Category

  • Latest News

  • Follow us on Twitter