Successful CT / JT Memorial Meeting held in Leeds

This year’s John Tyndall Memorial Meeting was again held in Leeds (for the second year running) on Saturday November 23rd.

However, this year it was a joint Colin Jordan and John Tyndall Memorial meeting and was organised by the British Movement.

Heritage and Destiny were kindly invited to attend, and H&D deputy editor Peter Rushton was one of the main speakers, while editor Mark Cotterill manned the H&D literature table.

Steve Frost, National Secretary of British Movement

The attendance of around sixty (including three former Borough councillors – Dr. Jim Lewthwaite (Wyke ward, Bradford); Angela Clarke (Keighley West ward, Bradford); and Mark Cotterill (Meadowhead ward, Blackburn); and one former MEP, Andrew Brons (Yorkshire & Humber) – was very impressive. Most of those attending were BM members, but also half a dozen British Democrats, and a couple each from the National Front and English Democrats, plus the H&D team.

Peter Rushton, H&D
Dr Jim Lewthwaite,
Chairman, British Democrats
Andrew Brons, former MEP

The speakers included: Richard Edmonds (NF Directorate member, former BNP national organiser, and right-hand man to John Tyndall); Benny Bullman (long standing BM member and lead singer of the Nationalist band Whitelaw); Dr. Jim Lewthwaite (the chairman of the British Democrats); Andrew Brons (former MEP for Yorkshire); Peter Rushton (H&D deputy editor); Alec Suchi (nationalist climate change activist); and Steve Frost (BM National Secretary).

The meeting which was ably chaired by Tony (a local BM member of longstanding), was the second successful Leeds meeting in the same venue this year, and hopefully more will follow in the new year.

During the first interval a superb buffet of both hot and cold food, was laid on, by the BM’s Women’s Division. And during the second interval an auction of classic national socialist memorabilia was held, raising several hundred pounds for BM funds.

Both the BM and H&D had literature stalls which did a brisk trade throughout the afternoon, with H&D picking up a couple of new subscribers on top – which is always good.

Richard Edmonds, NF Directorate member and former BNP national organiser

As at most nationalist events, there was no trouble at all at the meeting, which was held in a good old-fashioned Yorkshire pub, in a White working-class area of Leeds – not the sort of the pub the posh yuppies from Hope Not Hate or Antifa would ever set foot in! But if they had they would have been met by a large BM security team – led by Jordan Pont – who were more than capable of showing them the door – if they had dared turn up!

BM produced a nice souvenir programme of the event. Copies are still available by writing to PO Box 6, Heckmondwike, Yorkshire, WF16 0XG; or email – sunwheelteam@gmail.com – or visit the BM website at – www.britishmovement.info

Some of the speakers and organisers at the end of the Leeds meeting

Brexit dominates General Election – racial nationalist parties stand aside

Nominations closed today for the UK General Election on December 12th, and H&D readers will not be surprised to learn that there are very few candidates from racial nationalist parties.

Both the National Front and the British Democratic Party have agreed to stand aside from this General Election, recognising that it will be dominated by the Brexit issue and that most racial nationalists will wish to use their votes to support a pro-Brexit candidate. (Though there is of course a minority of our movement that takes an anti-Brexit line, following the tradition of Sir Oswald Mosley’s post-war Union Movement.)

For the BNP, David Furness will be contesting the Hornchurch & Upminster constituency in outer East London, where he seems to be the only non-Tory, pro-Brexit candidate. He is the only BNP candidate nationwide: this is the tenth general election that the BNP has contested since it was founded in 1982, and its lowest-ever number of candidates.

Former BNP activist Dr Andrew Emerson is contesting his home constituency of Chichester for the Patria party which he formed with LEL, NF and BNP veteran Dennis Whiting and fellow nationalists who broke away from the BNP some years ago. This will be Dr Emerson’s third parliamentary campaign in Chichester during the past four years: this time he has no opponent from UKIP or the Brexit Party.

Gary Butler, who was NF candidate for Maidstone & the Weald in 2010 and English Democrat candidate for Faversham & Mid Kent in 2015, is an Independent candidate this year, again for Faversham & Mid Kent.

Meanwhile in the Liverpool West Derby constituency, veteran nationalist activist Joe Owens appears as proposer on the nomination papers of Brexit Party candidate Ray Pearson – though Mr Owens has recently posted a YouTube video criticising party leader Nigel Farage for striking a deal to stand down 317 candidates in Tory-held constituencies.

Vicky Felton – councillor for the Democrats & Veterans Party in Monk Bretton ward, Barnsley – is the Brexit Party candidate for Barnsley Central. There has not been any announcement of a merger between D&V and the Brexit Party, and Mrs Felton’s husband Gavin remains D&V Party chairman, so this might be a temporary arrangement just for this election. Similarly Rebecca Rees-Evans, husband of D&V founder and leader Jonathan Rees-Evans, is Brexit Party candidate for Cynon Valley, where she was UKIP candidate in 2015.

There are five English Democrat candidates this year (only one of whom has a Brexit Party opponent and none of whom have UKIP opponents); while the Veterans and People’s Party is contesting Great Yarmouth, without Brexit Party or UKIP opposition, and Linlithgow & East Falkirk, where it has a Brexit Party opponent.

There are only 44 UKIP candidates nationwide (down from 467 just two years ago) – including two in Northern Ireland and seven in Scotland – but in thirteen of these constituencies UKIP and the Brexit Party are standing against each other, including two in Sunderland, two in Sheffield, and Oldham West & Royton.

There are ex-UKIP independents standing in several constituencies, including former party leader Henry Bolton, who will be Independent candidate for his home constituency Folkestone & Hythe. His splinter party Our Nation was deregistered last month after only a year in existence.

H&D will feature reports and analysis on the UK General Election during the next few weeks, and our January 2020 edition will examine future strategies for our movement once the Brexit issue has (one way or another) been resolved.

Final candidate totals for 2019 local elections

With today’s release of nominations for local authority elections in Northern Ireland, H&D can now publish our calculation of the final candidate totals for the UK’s various eurosceptic / nationalist political parties.

Not all of these parties are in any way racial nationalist, and not all racial nationalists are in any way eurosceptic, but we publish this list for our readers’ interest in showing the state of British electoral politics everywhere to the right of the Conservative Party.

Perhaps even “right” is not the correct word, but it is from somewhere within this spectrum that a new force will have to be drawn to rescue the United Kingdom from its multiracial / multicultural chaos of recent decades.

UKIP has eighteen candidates in various parts of Ulster, given them a total of 1,400 candidates across the UK for the scheduled local council elections, plus three mayoral candidates and about twenty in local by-elections that are also being held on May 2nd.

In other words UKIP will be contesting 16% of the available seats this year

Anne Marie Waters’ For Britain Movement has no candidates in Ulster, so their total remains 42.

Democrats & Veterans have three Ulster candidates, giving them 20 nationwide, plus a by-election candidate in the London Borough of Lewisham.

The new party Aontú, on which H&D recently reported, is a socially conservative and eurosceptic split from both Sinn Féin and the SDLP (north of the border) and Fianna Fáil south of the border. Aontú has sixteen candidates in various parts of Northern Ireland: an impressive total for a very new party.

Jolene Bunting, originally elected as a councillor for Traditional Unionist Voice, later became associated with the anti-Islamist group Britain First, which has failed to register as a political party but is supporting two independent candidates for English councils. Ms Bunting is standing as an Independent in the Court area of Belfast. It is not clear to H&D precisely what her present relationship is with Britain First following some internal rows last year.

TUV themselves have 32 local authority candidates this year.

So the updated candidate totals are as follows:

  • UKIP 1,400
  • For Britain 42
  • Traditional Unionist Voice 32
  • Democrats & Veterans 20
  • Aontú 16
  • English Democrats 10
  • Veterans & People’s Party 7
  • Our Nation 5
  • National Front 3
  • Populist 3
  • Britain First (standing as Independents) 3
  • British Democrats 2
  • BNP 2
  • British Resistance 1
  • Patria 1
  • Independents 3

For further details check our earlier articles on election nominations here and here.

H&D will continue to report on the local election campaign, and will include a comprehensive report on the results in our next issue, which as a consequence will appear slightly later than normal in early May.

UKIP misses broadcast target as NF overtakes dying BNP

UKIP leader Gerard Batten (left) with EDL founder Stephen Yaxley-Lennon (alias ‘Tommy Robinson’) whose increasingly close relationship with the party has prompted Nigel Farage and others to resign.

The United Kingdom Independence Party will have 1,382 candidates at the local council elections on May 2nd, according to an analysis by Heritage and Destiny. Our estimate is based on documents from 270 English councils and does not yet include Northern Ireland, where candidate totals have not yet been published. (There will also be a few UKIP local by-election candidates, and three Mayoral candidates on the same day.)

This is less than half the number that UKIP had aimed for to qualify for a television broadcast.

However even to reach this number (given the collapse of many UKIP branches) involved a colossal effort by the party’s national headquarters, twisting the arms of local members.

There are several councils where UKIP even its present state has managed to put up a full slate of candidates for every vacancy: these include Derby, Sunderland, North Tyneside, Worcester, Bolton and Eastleigh.

Alan Graves, leader of the UKIP group on Derby City Council, one of the party’s most successful branches

However there are others where the party is now reduced to a token effort or has disappeared from the electoral map: these include Blackpool, Fylde, Lincoln, Basildon, Solihull and Middlesbrough. Most notably UKIP has been almost obliterated in its former strongholds of Thurrock (where it is down to two candidates) and Thanet (a council UKIP used to control but now has only three candidates). Numerous former UKIP councillors are standing in these areas as ‘Thurrock Independents’ or ‘Thanet Independents’.

The good news for Gerard Batten’s party is that in the absence of his most important rival Nigel Farage – whose new Brexit Party is sitting out these local elections and concentrating on potential European and General Elections later this year – UKIP has comfortably outshone three other splinter parties. We are not yet aware of any local council candidates formally designated as ‘Brexit Party’, though in practice a number of ‘Thanet Independents’ and ‘Thurrock Independents’ will probably end up following Farage.

The For Britain Movement founded by former UKIP leadership candidate Anne Marie Waters will have 42 council candidates nationwide, according to H&D‘s analysis. These include eight in Leeds; four in the West Midlands racial battleground of Sandwell; three in Stoke; and perhaps most significantly two in Epping Forest. These latter two – former BNP councillor Patricia Richardson and former BNP London mayoral candidate Julian Leppert – are among the few candidates from the broad spectrum of British nationalism who have a chance of winning this year.

Anne Marie Waters on the by-election campaign trail with former BNP election guru Eddy Butler, who now runs For Britain’s strongest branch

Another UKIP splinter group Democrats & Veterans, founded by former UKIP leadership candidate John Rees-Evans, has 17 candidates in the main local elections, plus one in a London Borough of Lewisham by-election. The strongest D&V branches are in Yorkshire, where they have three candidates in Barnsley and three in Sheffield.

The English Democrats won over a few BNP defectors during 2010-2011, and though most of this group have since left the party, ED leader Robin Tilbrook has scored a publicity coup in recent weeks after launching a legal action to rescue Brexit. The EDs have ten local council candidates this year, including six in Barnsley. In the Derbyshire borough of Amber Valley their sole candidate is former NF and BNP activist Mick Sharpe.

The Veterans’ and People’s Party has a manifesto that combines independence from European control with some traditionally socialist / social democratic policies on housing and welfare. Their interim leader is Robin Horsfall, an SAS veteran of the famous Iranian Embassy siege in 1980. VAPP have seven candidates in different council areas.

UKIP’s short-lived leader Henry Bolton, who was forced to quit in February 2018, now leads a tiny party of loyal followers called Our Nation: they have five candidates this year, all but one of them in Dover.

NF candidate for Brunshaw ward, Burnley, Steven Smith (left)

There are no elections this year in London or Birmingham, which has drastically reduced the number of potential National Front candidates. In fact there are just three NF council candidates this year: deputy chairman Jordan Pont in Sheffield; Chris Jackson in Calderdale; and Steven Smith in Burnley.

Despite this relatively modest campaign, 2019 might go down in history as the year the NF overtook the BNP. The truth is that the NF has for a year or two now been much the more significant nationalist organisation, in all but the financial sense. Nevertheless it will shock many observers that the BNP are down to just two council candidates this year, one in Broxbourne and the other in Sevenoaks.

Dr Jim Lewthwaite, British Democrats chairman and one of last year’s most successful nationalist candidates.

The British Democrats (mostly made up of former BNP members) will have two candidates this year. Former councillor Dr Jim Lewthwaite again contests Wyke ward, Bradford, where he achieved one of last year’s best nationalist results; while Kevan Stafford contests Loughborough Shelthorpe ward, Charnwood.

Former BNP organiser Dr Andrew Emerson continues to run his breakaway party Patria, and will again be the party’s sole candidate in Chichester.

Similarly the British Resistance party, closely associated with controversial ex-UKIP candidate Jack Sen, will have just one candidate this year – Mr Sen’s ally Carl Mason in Worcester.

Several prominent nationalists are supporting the Populist Party‘s campaign in Sunderland, where they will have two candidates in the scheduled May 2nd elections, plus a third in a by-election held the same day.

Pete Molloy, an Independent nationalist candidate in Spennymoor

There are also several veteran nationalists standing as Independents or without a party label this year. These include Pete Molloy in Spennymoor ward, Durham; Alan Girvan in Heckmondwike ward, Kirklees; and Joe Owens in Kensington & Fairfield ward, Liverpool.

The eager publicity-seekers of Britain First have failed to register with the Electoral Commission as a political party, so their name cannot appear on ballot papers. However Paul Rudge (a Britain First activist) will be standing as an independent in Rowley ward, Sandwell, as will his Britain First colleague Geoff Miles in Ware Trinity ward, East Hertfordshire.

Summary of eurosceptic / nationalist candidate totals at 2019 local council elections:

  • UKIP 1,382
  • For Britain 42
  • Democrats & Veterans 17
  • English Democrats 10
  • Veterans’ and People’s Party 7
  • Our Nation 5
  • National Front 3
  • Populist 3
  • British Democrats 2
  • BNP 2
  • Britain First (standing as independents) 2
  • British Resistance 1
  • Patria 1
  • Independents 3

RIP: Ken Booth and Stephen Mitford Goodson

The H&D team was very sad to learn of the deaths of two old friends and comrades in recent weeks.

Ken Booth of Newcastle, leading organiser for NF, BNP and British Democrats

Ken Booth, for years one of the most active nationalists in North East England, died from cancer on 17th July aged 65. Ken served in senior positions with the National Front, British National Party and British Democratic Party. Ken leaves eleven children, the youngest aged 7. His talents in leaflet design and branch organisation made racial nationalism the main challenger to Labour hegemony in many parts of the North East, and it is tragic to reflect on how much more he could have achieved had our movement not been blighted by factional division since the millennium.

Stephen Mitford Goodson addressing H&D‘s 2013 John Tyndall Memorial Meeting in Preston.

Stephen Mitford Goodson, a frequent H&D contributor and a former director of the South African Reserve Bank, died on 4th August aged 70. While we knew that Ken Booth had been seriously ill, Stephen’s death came as a shock: his last contribution to our magazine will appear in the November issue. Stephen Mitford Goodson was a relentless and well-informed critic of the global financial elite and a contributing editor of The Barnes Review. His work serialised in H&D included biographies of two very different South African leaders, Gen. Jan Christian Smuts and Dr Hendrik Frensch Verwoerd.

RIP Ken and Stephen: we shall remember your courage and commitment as we continue the struggle.

New archive for British ‘alt-right’ heritage

A newly launched online archive ‘Roots of Radicalism’ contains vital resources on the ideological heritage of our movement.

This website will be regularly updated and extended: it presently contains thirty articles from the British nationalist magazine Vanguard, first published during 1986/1987.

The site’s founders write:

The term ‘alt-right’ has become widely used in recent years. It does not describe a single, monolithic ideology, but rather a spectrum of related ideas and values. However, it can be said that the alt-right generally:

  • Recognises the positive values of group identities, nationalities and ethnicities;
  • Is prepared to unflinchingly challenge the dominant values of the liberal consensus, including the obsessive egalitarianism of the left;
  • Is not materialistic, and does not think that economic growth is the solution to every problem;
  • Does not believe itself to be on the same side as global capitalism – this, more than anything else, distinguishes the ‘alternative right’ from the conventional right.

Mainstream media commentators, blinkered by years of liberal orthodoxy, have tended to regard the alt-right as a disturbing, new phenomenon. We hope they are right to be disturbed, but they are wrong if they think that the ‘alt-right’ is new: its roots go back a long way, long before the term ‘alt-right’ had ever been thought of.

This website looks at the British contribution to this dissident political heritage, and – when finished – will include hundreds of articles from a wide variety of sources, from independent thinkers to those supporting nationalistic political parties.

As you will see these articles do not represent a single ‘party line’. The writers used a variety of different terms to describe themselves: not ‘alt-right’ but radical right or new right. Indeed many would have rejected the term ‘right-wing’ altogether, believing that they were trying to create an alternative to the existing, conventional Left-Right dichotomy and not wanting to be confused with the capitalist right. Such people generally used terms like ‘radical nationalist’ or ‘ethnic nationalist’ to describe themselves. Needless to say, the political Left used rather different terms, of varying degrees of ranting hysteria…

We believe, however, that the content of their writings are more significant than the labels attached to them. What these writers have in common is that they cared about Britain and the British people and tried to show that there is an alternative to the conventional ‘-isms’ of capitalism, liberalism, socialism or communism.

We hope you find this website to be a useful resource. It is our intention to add about thirty articles a month to the site, so please bookmark us, and visit us again from time to time. If there are worthy publications, authors and articles you feel we have overlooked please contact us and let us know – we make no claims to omniscience!

The archive is online now at www.rootsofradicalism.com

Nationalist candidates at 2018 local elections

Tess Culnane, BNP candidate for Downham ward, Lewisham

Regular H&D readers will not be surprised to see only a small number of nationalist candidates at this year’s local elections, even though the London borough councils were up for election, which usually means a big increase in candidates from a normal year. We are in a transitional period, with UKIP in terminal decline, but its remnants still blocking the way for the re-emergence of a large scale nationalist effort.

The big story was the retirement of long serving BNP councillor Brian Parker, who stood down in Marsden ward, Pendle. There was no new BNP candidate to replace Mr Parker, so the party gave up its last borough council seat. All bar one of the remaining BNP candidates this year were in London, and almost all finished bottom of the poll, the main exceptions being brothers John and Dave Clarke who achieved credible results in Croydon, and Tess Culnane in Downham ward, Lewisham, who defeated a full slate from the ex-UKIP party Democrats & Veterans.

The highest BNP vote was for Michael Jones in East Wickham ward, Bexley, who had no UKIP or similar opponent, and the best nationalist vote overall was for ex-BNP organiser Steven Smith in Brunshaw ward, Burnley, who similarly had no UKIP or post-UKIP opposition.  Arguably the best performance however was by Dr Jim Lewthwaite in Wyke ward, Bradford, who doubled his vote and finished ahead of both UKIP and the breakaway ex-UKIP party Democrats & Veterans.

The list below shows the result for every nationalist candidate that we know of, and will be updated if further information arrives.

see also report and analysis here

BNP: 16 candidates

London Borough of Barking & Dagenham
Eastbrook – Tony McKay – 158 votes (5,2%, -1.2) – 8th of 8
Goresbrook – Bede Smith – 246 votes (10.8%, -3.1) – 7th of 7

London Borough of Bexley
East Wickham – Michael Jones – 398 votes (9.5%, -0.7) – 7th of 7
Erith – Pamela Mackie – 154 votes (6.5%, -2.5) – 5th of 5
Falconwood & Welling – Jaymie McCoy – 101 votes (1.9%, -7.0) – 12th of 12
Northumberland Heath – Robert Howard – 160 votes (5.1%, -7.0) – 6th of 6
Sidcup – John Brooks – 130 votes (2.6%, -1.5), 12th of 13

London Borough of Croydon
New Addington N – John Clarke – 142 votes (7.1%) – 5th of 8
New Addington S – Dave Clarke – 131 votes (4.8%) – 6th of 8
Selsdon & Addington Village – Michael Collard – 42 votes (1.1%) – 9th of 9

London Borough of Ealing
Northolt West End – David Furness – 180 votes (4.5%, -3.7) – 10th of 13

Royal Borough of Greenwich
Coldharbour & New Eltham – Cliff Adams – 123 votes (2.8%, -5.3) – 12th of 12

London Borough of Havering
Saint Andrew’s – Denise Underwood – 123 votes (2.5%) – 12th of 13

London Borough of Hillingdon
West Drayton – Vincent Evans – 143 votes (3.6%) – 7th of 9

London Borough of Lewisham
Downham – Tess Culnane – 98 votes (2.9%) – 12th of 15

Exeter City Council
St Thomas – Chris Stone – 34 votes (1.2%, -0.2) – 5th of 5

 

National Front: 5 candidates

London Borough of Havering
Gooshays – Kevin Layzell – 50 votes (1.4%) – 18th of 18

London Borough of Sutton
St Helier – Richard Edmonds – 49 votes (1.7%) – 13th of 13

Calderdale Metropolitan Borough
Todmorden – Chris Jackson – 98 votes (2.7%) – 5th of 5

Rossendale Borough Council
Irwell – Kevin Bryan – 56 votes (4.6%) – 3rd of 3

Amber Valley Borough Council
Langley Mill & Aldercar – Tim Knowles – 30 votes (2.7%) – 4th of 4

 

British Democratic Party: 1 candidate

Bradford City Council
Wyke – Dr Jim Lewthwaite – 161 votes (5.5%, +2.7) – 3rd of 7

 

British Resistance: 1 candidate

Worcester City Council
Nunnery – Carl Mason – 17 votes (0.8%, +0.4) – 5th of 5

 

Independent nationalist candidates

Burnley Borough Council
Brunshaw – Steven Smith – 171 votes (14.8%) – 3rd of 4

Liverpool City Council
Kensington & Fairfield – Joe Owens – 114 votes (4.9%) – 3rd of 6

Manchester City Council
Crumpsall – John Rowe – 138 votes (3.4%) – 10th of 11

 

English Democrats: 4 candidates
(we include the EDs in this list because in recent years the party absorbed some former BNP members and therefore included some people who would be regarded by H&D readers as part of our movement; we should however make it clear that none of the candidates below are former BNP members)

Sheffield City Region Mayoralty
David Allen – 14,547 votes (5.6%) – 6th of 7

Barnsley Metropolitan Borough
Rockingham – Kevin Riddiough – 235 votes (11.1%, +8.7) – 3rd of 4

Bury Metropolitan Borough
Besses – Steve Morris – 169 votes (7.1%, -9.4) – 3rd of 5

Salford City Council
Swinton South – Craig Holmes – 163 votes (7.4%) – 3rd of 6

 

Nationalist candidates in this year’s elections

ballot box

 

Polls have closed in local elections held today across many parts of the country – with the notable exception of Greater London.  These elections will be seen as a dress rehearsal for next month’s general election, but are likely to be distorted by very low turnouts.

The big losers this week are likely to be UKIP and Labour, with gains for the SNP, Conservatives and Liberal Democrats. Click here for updated results and analysis of the bigger election picture.

There are also a small number of candidates from nationalist parties, as explained in our article on election nominations last month.

 

BNP – 12 candidates

Essex
Halstead – Paul Hooks  0.5%
Heybridge & Tollesbury – Richard Perry  8.2%
Maldon – Trevor Cable  2.4%
Pitsea (2 vacancies) – Paul Borg and Christine Winter  2.1%

Kent
Dartford NE – Ronald Ball 1.6%
Dartford W – Michael Cope  0.9%
Swanley – Cliff Le May 2.5%

Hampshire
Hayling Island – John Moore  0.6%

Lancashire
Nelson E – John Rowe  10.8%
Pendle C – Brian Parker  20.4%

Lincolnshire
Louth S – Robert Ashton  1.5%


National Front – 4 candidates

Aberdeen
Tillydrone, Seaton & Old Aberdeen – Dave MacDonald 1.2%
Torry & Ferryhill – Billy Watson 0.2%

Bridgend
Llangewydd & Brynhyfryd – Adam Lloyd 3.0%

Lancashire
Whitworth & Bacup – Kevin Bryan 1.6%


English Democrats – 4 candidates (we include the EDs in this list because in recent years the party absorbed some former BNP members and therefore included some people who would be regarded by H&D readers as part of our movement; we should however make it clear that none of the candidates below are former BNP members)

Bury
Besses (by-election) – Steve Morris  6.9%

Cambridgeshire & Peterborough
Mayoral election – Stephen Goldspink  1.1%

Essex
Ongar & Rural – Robin Tilbrook  1.7%

Greater Manchester
Mayoral election – Steve Morris  2.0%


British Resistance – 2 candidates

Worcestershire
Gorse Hill & Warndon – Linda Bell 2.0%
Nunnery – Carl Mason 0.5%


British Democratic Party

Leicestershire
Loughborough S – Kevan Stafford  1.1%


Patria

West Sussex
Chichester W – Dr Andrew Emerson  0.5%
(also contesting a simultaneous borough by-election in East Wittering, Chichester1.4%


Independent

Durham
Spennymoor – Pete Molloy  14.8%

Leicestershire
Coalville N – Graham Partner  2.3%

 

BNP boosted by UKIP’s disappearance in Pendle

ballot-boxes-460_1418302c

Nominations closed on Tuesday for various local elections being held across most of the UK (except London) on May 4th.

As expected there will be very few candidates from traditional nationalist parties, with most interest focused on just how far UKIP declines. In several (especially northern) counties UKIP have lost about half of their candidates.

For example, we now know that UKIP will have 36 candidates in Lancashire this year, compared to 63 last time; similarly in Cumbria the UKIP candidate list is down from 52 to 23; in North Yorkshire down from 48 to 24; in Durham down from 31 to 14; and in Derbyshire down from 54 to 38.  Further south and east the party has more candidates, though weaker in the South West: down from 48 to 24 in Somerset and from 77 to 21 in Cornwall. The biggest decline is in Wiltshire, where UKIP had 54 candidates last time, but only 8 this year.

One early surprise is in Pendle (part of Lancashire County Council) where the BNP will have two candidates, neither of them opposed by UKIP. Long-serving borough councillor Brian Parker faces Conservative, Labour and Liberal Democrat opponents in the Pendle Central division, while his colleague John Rowe has only Labour and Conservative opponents (both Asian) in Nelson East.

Pendle BNP councillor and county council candidate Brian Parker

Pendle BNP councillor and county council candidate Brian Parker

 

 

British Democratic Party candidate Kevin Stafford

British Democratic Party candidate Kevin Stafford

Kevan Stafford of the British Democrats will contest the Loughborough South division of Leicestershire, his party’s sole candidate.

The National Front will have four candidates across the UK: chairman Kevin Bryan is standing in the Whitworth & Bacup division of Lancashire. Unfortunately (like Mr Stafford of the Brit Dems) he has UKIP opposition.

Dave MacDonald (Mr Bryan’s successor as NF chairman) is contesting the Tillydrone, Seaton & Old Aberdeen ward of Aberdeen City Council.  Mr MacDonald is of course already an elected community councillor in the Aberdeen suburb of Garthdee. Also in Aberdeen, the NF’s Billy Watson is contesting the Torry & Ferryhill ward.

Mr MacDonald’s former deputy Adam Lloyd is NF candidate for Llangewydd & Brynhyfryd ward, Bridgend.

Kevin Bryan of the National Front, standing in his home area of Whitworth & Backup, Lancashire

Kevin Bryan of the National Front, standing in his home area of Whitworth & Backup, Lancashire

Three BNP candidates are standing in Kent: former GLA candidate Cliff Le May in Swanley; Ronald Ball in Dartford NE; and Michael Cope in Dartford West.  Mr Le May is the only one without UKIP opposition: bearing in mind UKIP polled almost 20% in Swanley four years ago, he will be hopeful of a good result in their absence.

There are five BNP candidates in Essex (compared to 14 in 2013 and 75 in 2009): former Braintree parliamentary candidate Paul Hooks in Halstead; Paul Borg and Christine Winter in the two-councillor Pitsea division; Richard Perry in Heybridge & Tollesbury; and Trevor Cable in Maldon. The latter two are standing under the label Fighting Unsustainable Housing Because We Care (which the party has successfully used to win parish council seats in the past without mentioning the BNP name).  We don’t yet know whether this time the name BNP will appear on the ballot paper in these two divisions.

British Resistance (the party founded by supporters of ex-UKIP parliamentary candidate Jack Sen) have two candidates in Worcestershire: former BNP organiser Carl Mason in Nunnery; and Linda Bell in Gorse Hill & Warndon.

Former BNP parliamentary candidate Dr Andrew Emerson is Patria candidate for the Chichester West division of West Sussex. Dr Emerson is also contesting a borough council by-election on the same day in East Wittering ward, Chichester.

Robin Tilbrook - is the ED party over?

Robin Tilbrook – is the ED party over?

Following the imprisonment of former party official Steve Uncles for election fraud, English Democrats candidates are notable by their absence. There are no ED candidates in the former stronghold Doncaster – which has an all-out council and mayoral election this year with no ED presence. So far we only know about party leader Robin Tilbrook, standing in his local Essex division Ongar & Rural, plus ED mayoral candidates Steve Morris in Greater Manchester and Stephen Goldspink in Cambridgeshire and Peterborough. Steve Morris is also contesting a by-election in Besses ward, Bury.

Robert Ashton is BNP candidate for the Louth South division of Lincolnshire, while John Moore is contesting the Hayling Island division of Hampshire.

Former Liverpool BNP organiser Pete Molloy is standing as an independent in the Spennymoor division of Durham (technically a unitary authority rather than a county council). Despite this being the home of party leader Adam Walker, there are no BNP candidates in Durham, nor in Cumbria where the party’s head office is located.

Further news of candidates and campaigns will be posted as we get it. So far H&D believes that the BNP has 12 county council candidates in total, compared to 92 at the last county elections in 2013.

According to H&D‘s (unofficial) calculation, UKIP have 1,037 candidates for the county councils this year: that’s down from 1,494 last time. There are also six unitary authorities that are directly comparable, having elections both in 2013 and this year.  In those six councils combined, UKIP has 85 candidates this year, compared to 242 last time.

There has been a real UKIP collapse in three unitary council areas – Cornwall (from 77 candidates to 21), Wiltshire (from 54 to 8), and Shropshire (from 29 to 9).
By contrast in several South Eastern or Eastern counties UKIP has maintained pretty solid slates: 69 in Kent, 60 in West Sussex, 59 in Essex, 57 in Surrey and 54 in Norfolk.
NOTE: An earlier version of this article incorrectly stated that former Liverpool BNP organiser Pete Molloy was at one time briefly a member of British Voice. We apologise for this error.

Video from 2015 John Tyndall Memorial Meeting

Video footage is now online from the 10th John Tyndall Memorial Meeting, organised by Heritage and Destiny in Preston, Lancashire on 10th October 2015.

A DVD will be available soon: for details email heritageanddestiny@yahoo.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

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