Nationalist candidates at 2018 local elections

Tess Culnane, BNP candidate for Downham ward, Lewisham

Regular H&D readers will not be surprised to see only a small number of nationalist candidates at this year’s local elections, even though the London borough councils are up for election this year, which usually means a big increase in candidates from a normal year. We are in a transitional period, with UKIP in terminal decline, but its remnants still blocking the way for the re-emergence of a large scale nationalist effort.

The big story is the retirement of long serving BNP councillor Brian Parker, who is standing down in Marsden ward, Pendle. There is no new BNP candidate to replace Mr Parker, so the party is giving up its last borough council seat.

The list below shows every nationalist candidate that we know of, and will be updated if further information arrives. If you have a candidate in your area, try to get out to give him or her a helping hand, regardless of party/faction.

BNP: 16 candidates

London Borough of Barking & Dagenham
Eastbrook – Tony McKay
Goresbrook – Bede Smith

London Borough of Bexley
East Wickham – Michael Jones
Erith – Pamela Mackie
Falconwood & Welling – Jaymie McCoy
Northumberland Heath – Robert Howard
Sidcup – John Brooks

London Borough of Croydon
New Addington N – John Clarke
New Addington S – Dave Clarke
Selsdon & Addington Village – Michael Collard

London Borough of Ealing
Northolt West End – David Furness

Royal Borough of Greenwich
Coldharbour & New Eltham – Cliff Adams

London Borough of Havering
Saint Andrews – Denise Underwood

London Borough of Hillingdon
West Drayton – Vincent Evans

London Borough of Lewisham
Downham – Tess Culnane

Exeter City Council
St Thomas – Chris Stone

 

National Front: 4 candidates

London Borough of Havering
Gooshays – Kevin Layzell

London Borough of Sutton
St Helier – Richard Edmonds

Calderdale Metropolitan Borough
Todmorden – Chris Jackson

Rossendale Borough Council
Irwell – Kevin Bryan

 

British Democratic Party: 1 candidate

Bradford City Council
Wyke – Dr Jim Lewthwaite

 

British Resistance: 1 candidate

Worcester City Council
Nunnery – Carl Mason

 

Independent nationalist candidates

Burnley Borough Council
Brunshaw – Steven Smith

Liverpool City Council
Kensington & Fairfield – Joe Owens

 

English Democrats: 4 candidates
(we include the EDs in this list because in recent years the party absorbed some former BNP members and therefore included some people who would be regarded by H&D readers as part of our movement; we should however make it clear that none of the candidates below are former BNP members)

Sheffield City Region Mayoralty
David Allen

Barnsley Metropolitan Borough
Rockingham – Kevin Riddiough

Bury Metropolitan Borough
Besses – Steve Morris

Salford City Council
Swinton South – Craig Holmes

 

BNP gives up its last council seat without a fight

Pendle BNP councillor Brian Parker is stepping down this year, and the party is not putting up a candidate in his Marsden ward – the last BNP council seat in the country

Today the BNP surrendered its last council seat without a fight.  Just a few years ago the party was hitting the headlines with council victories in many areas of England, and even two Members of the European Parliament.  Yet today the press didn’t even notice when the last BNP council seat – Marsden ward, Pendle – was given up.

Nominations closed this afternoon for the local council elections, and it can now be confirmed that long-serving Cllr Brian Parker will not be defending his seat.  No one can blame Cllr Parker for retiring: he has put in a big effort sustained over twelve years, first gaining the seat from Labour in 2006, then winning re-election in 2010 and 2014.  He also contested the Pendle Central division four times at Lancashire County Council elections, most recently last year, and was parliamentary candidate for Pendle at last year’s general election.

The truth is that the BNP has collapsed around Mr Parker and a handful of other nationalist true-believers, and its national leadership is now devoted to hunting financial legacies rather than genuine political activity. The six surviving BNP candidates so far declared (all but one in London) are: David Furness in Northolt West End ward, Ealing; Vincent Evans in West Drayton ward, Hillingdon; Denise Underwood in Saint Andrews ward, Havering; Bede Smith in Goresbrook ward, Barking & Dagenham; Tony McKay in Eastbrook ward, Barking & Dagenham; and Chris Stone in St Thomas ward, Exeter.

Elsewhere veteran nationalist Richard Edmonds will be National Front candidate for St Helier ward, Sutton, unfortunately facing a full slate of three UKIP opponents, as is Kevin Layzell in Gooshays ward, Havering.  NF chairman Kevin Bryan is more lucky, facing no UKIP opposition in Irwell ward, Rossendale where he is in a three-way fight against Lab and Con. Similarly Chris Jackson as NF candidate for Todmorden ward, Calderdale, has no UKIP opponent.

NF chairman Kevin Bryan is contesting his home ward of Irwell, Rossendale

Dr Jim Lewthwaite, chairman of the British Democratic Party, will be British Democrats candidate for Wyke ward, Bradford – the sole nationalist candidate in a city which once had four BNP councillors.

Former BNP, NF and EFP candidate Steven Smith (architect of the BNP’s success in Burnley sixteen years ago) is standing as Independent candidate for Brunshaw ward, Burnley, where he has no UKIP opposition.

Controversial nationalist author Joe Owens is Independent candidate for Kensington & Fairfield ward, Liverpool.

The almost extinct English Democrats have a candidate in Salford, yet another city where a once strong BNP branch has completely disappeared.  Probably the most high profile ED campaign will be for the new Sheffield City Region mayoralty, where David Allen is ED candidate.  This new region includes Doncaster, where the EDs won the old mayoralty in 2009. Another longstanding ED Kevin Riddiough will again be contesting Rockingham ward, Barnsley, and similarly Steve Morris will again contest Besses ward, Bury.

In most of the country the breaking news is of UKIP decline and in many cases disappearance, most notably in their former stronghold of Thurrock, where the entire UKIP group of councillors (including MEP Tim Aker) has left the party.  These councillors will be standing for re-election as ‘Thurrock Independents’, while the official UKIP has mustered only five candidates across the borough.

There are no UKIP candidates in Oldham, where the party is failing to defend the two seats gained in 2014.  Former UKIP councillor Warren Bates is standing for re-election as an Independent in the Failsworth West ward. Another old BNP stronghold where UKIP has now completely disappeared is Barking & Dagenham.  It is rare this year to find a council with a full UKIP slate of candidates for every ward: two examples are Derby and Swindon. In the whole of Birmingham there is only one UKIP candidate, though at least one ex-UKIP parliamentary candidate is standing as an independent.  Former UKIP leadership has candidate John Rees-Evans now runs a ‘Democrats and Veterans’ party which has candidates for several councils this year, including several in Yorkshire: Bradford, Leeds, Barnsley, Harrogate, Wakefield, Kirklees, and Hull.

So far it looks as though Mr Rees-Evans’s party will have substantially more candidates than another newly registered party led by another former UKIP leadership candidate. The ‘For Britain Movement’ created by Anne-Marie Waters on an anti-Islam platform is contesting the Washington North ward in Sunderland, another area where the UKIP branch seems to have collapsed. The strongest For Britain branch appears to be in Leeds, where they are contesting six city council wards. This should give them a chance of some decent results, because following boundary changes the entire Leeds council is being elected this year, with voters in each ward having three votes. Usually this gives a big boost to small parties (as with Burnley BNP in 2002).

There are seven UKIP candidates in Leeds, and only one ward (Crossgates & Whinmoor) has both UKIP and For Britain.  Another of the few areas where For Britain is making progress is the Black Country borough of Sandwell, where there are three For Britain candidates and only one UKIP (the latter has For Britain opposition in Charlemont with Grove Vale ward).

A For Britain candidate is also standing in Yateley East ward, Hart.  On the opposite side of the European debate, another new party seems to be having the same marginal impact as Ms Waters.  The self-styled ‘centrist’ and pro-Remain party Renew, founded by former anti-terrorist officer Chris Coghlan, has twelve candidates so far: eight in its main London base of Wandsworth; two in North Tyneside; and one each in Ealing and Hounslow.

H&D will report further on the 2018 local council elections as nominations are announced.

p.s.: Any nationalists feeling a bit depressed by the state of our movement should spare a thought for the lavishly funded ‘anti-fascists’ of Hope not Hate, whose ‘expert’ election article today predicts that Anne-Marie Waters and For Britain will have Rotherham as one of their target areas in this year’s election.  In fact there are no council elections in Rotherham this year (not until 2020). We do hope none of that Soros money has been spent on special anti-fascist leaflets for Rotherham…

Griffin’s pantomime comeback

Nick Griffin is best remembered for his roles in Carry on Cleo (“Infamy, infamy, they’ve all got it in for me!”) and Sunset Boulevard (“I’m still big, it’s the politics that got small”).

This year Griffin follows in the footsteps of other show business hasbeens such as Mickey Rooney, trying to eke out his EU pension with a turn in that most British of theatrical traditions – pantomime.

Backed by canny impresario Jim Dowson, Griffin hopes that his tired routine of gags about queers, communists and spies – some not heard since his 1988 hit Attempted Murder – will have a gullible public queueing at the box office to hand over their hard earned shekels.

Griffin’s attempted comeback has been insightfully reviewed by veteran nationalist Eddy Morrison at Nationalist Sentinel, and by Jez Turner of the London Forum at Radio Aryan.

But we must warn readers. Beware the traditional panto cry to look “behind you”!  In Mr Griffin’s case there’s a very real chance he might have a knife (or worse) in his hand: you have been warned – watch your backs!

BNP and other nationalist votes

Pendle BNP councillor and county council candidate Brian Parker

Pendle BNP councillor and parliamentary candidate Brian Parker

An extraordinary General Election that wiped out Theresa May’s Conservative majority also saw the electoral eclipse of the BNP and the English Democrats, none of whose candidates even came close to saving their deposits.

Brian Parker – the BNP’s sole remaining borough councillor – polled only 718 votes (1.6%) in Pendle, his party’s main target seat.

BNP chairman Adam Walker managed a slightly better result in Bishop Auckland, but was bottom of the poll with 991 votes (2.3%).

Meanwhile the English Democrats’ results were even worse, collapsing from an already low base. As the SNP lost support north of the border it appears that the Union is safe, and logically ‘English’ nationalism has lost relevance.[spacer height=”20px”]

BNP results

Bexleyheath & Crayford
Peter Finch 0.6%

Bishop Auckland
Adam Walker 2.3%

Charnwood
Stephen Denham 0.6% (-0.4)

Dagenham & Rainham
Paul Sturdy 0.5% (+0.2)

Eltham
John Clarke 1.6%

Hornchurch & Upminster
David Furness 0.7% (+0.3)

Maldon [listed as ‘Fighting Unsustainable Housing’: BNP name not on ballot]
Richard Perry 0.5%

Old Bexley & Sidcup
Michael Jones 0.7% (+0.2)

Pendle
Brian Parker 1.6%

South Basildon & East Thurrock
Paul Borg 0.8%

——–

English Democrat candidates

Barnsley Central
Stephen Morris 0.5% (-0.8)

Barnsley East
Kevin Riddiough 0.7% (-0.4)

Bradford South
Thérèse Hirst 0.9%

Clacton
Robin Tilbrook 0.7%

Doncaster North
David Allen 0.9% (-0.3)

Holborn & St Pancras
Janus Polenceus 0.2%

NE Cambridgeshire
Stephen Goldspink 0.5%

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Paul Nuttall (left) has succeeded Nigel Farage as UKIP leader following a period of internal turmoil. He claims that UKIP will serious challenge Labour in Northern England.

Paul Nuttall (left) succeeded Nigel Farage last year as UKIP leader following a period of internal turmoil. He resigned today after electoral humiliation,

Meanwhile those racial nationalists who believed that UKIP offered us some hope must think again after the party suffered a series of crushing defeats, ending with the resignation of humiliated leader Paul Nuttall.

Notable UKIP disasters included Clacton (formerly their sole parliamentary seat until Douglas Carswell’s resignation) where UKIP’s vote fell from 44.4% to 7.6%; Thanet South (where re-elected Conservative MP Craig Mackinlay still faces criminal charges for fraudulent overspending during his defeat of Nigel Farage in 2015) – UKIP vote down from 32.4% to 6.0%; and Boston & Skegness, a key target seat contested by Nuttall himself – UKIP vote down from 33.8% to 7.7%.

The only vaguely credible UKIP result came in Thurrock, where UKIP’s Tim Aker (an MEP from a part-Turkish background) fought a vigorous campaign against pro-Remain Tory MP Jackie Doyle-Price.  However even here the UKIP vote fell from 31.7% to 20.1%. Ms Doyle-Price survived, and Labour pushed UKIP into third place.

 

Nationalist candidates in this year’s elections

ballot box

 

Polls have closed in local elections held today across many parts of the country – with the notable exception of Greater London.  These elections will be seen as a dress rehearsal for next month’s general election, but are likely to be distorted by very low turnouts.

The big losers this week are likely to be UKIP and Labour, with gains for the SNP, Conservatives and Liberal Democrats. Click here for updated results and analysis of the bigger election picture.

There are also a small number of candidates from nationalist parties, as explained in our article on election nominations last month.

 

BNP – 12 candidates

Essex
Halstead – Paul Hooks  0.5%
Heybridge & Tollesbury – Richard Perry  8.2%
Maldon – Trevor Cable  2.4%
Pitsea (2 vacancies) – Paul Borg and Christine Winter  2.1%

Kent
Dartford NE – Ronald Ball 1.6%
Dartford W – Michael Cope  0.9%
Swanley – Cliff Le May 2.5%

Hampshire
Hayling Island – John Moore  0.6%

Lancashire
Nelson E – John Rowe  10.8%
Pendle C – Brian Parker  20.4%

Lincolnshire
Louth S – Robert Ashton  1.5%


National Front – 4 candidates

Aberdeen
Tillydrone, Seaton & Old Aberdeen – Dave MacDonald 1.2%
Torry & Ferryhill – Billy Watson 0.2%

Bridgend
Llangewydd & Brynhyfryd – Adam Lloyd 3.0%

Lancashire
Whitworth & Bacup – Kevin Bryan 1.6%


English Democrats – 4 candidates (we include the EDs in this list because in recent years the party absorbed some former BNP members and therefore included some people who would be regarded by H&D readers as part of our movement; we should however make it clear that none of the candidates below are former BNP members)

Bury
Besses (by-election) – Steve Morris  6.9%

Cambridgeshire & Peterborough
Mayoral election – Stephen Goldspink  1.1%

Essex
Ongar & Rural – Robin Tilbrook  1.7%

Greater Manchester
Mayoral election – Steve Morris  2.0%


British Resistance – 2 candidates

Worcestershire
Gorse Hill & Warndon – Linda Bell 2.0%
Nunnery – Carl Mason 0.5%


British Democratic Party

Leicestershire
Loughborough S – Kevan Stafford  1.1%


Patria

West Sussex
Chichester W – Dr Andrew Emerson  0.5%
(also contesting a simultaneous borough by-election in East Wittering, Chichester1.4%


Independent

Durham
Spennymoor – Pete Molloy  14.8%

Leicestershire
Coalville N – Graham Partner  2.3%

 

Arthur Flinders: British Nationalist (1939-2017)

Obituary by Richard Edmonds

Quoting a verse from an old, pre-Christian Norse saga:

Cattle die, and kinsmen die,
And so one dies oneself;
One thing I know that never dies:
The fame of a dead man’s deeds.

Arthur Flinders with Jean-Marie Le Pen at the FN's Bleu-Blanc-Rouge festival in 1999

Arthur Flinders with Jean-Marie Le Pen at the FN’s Bleu-Blanc-Rouge festival in 1999

Our friend and comrade, a staunch British nationalist, a man who shared many of our adventures and was right in the thick of them, Arthur Flinders, has died.

Arthur Flinders, born in South London during the Second World War, had led an adventurous life long before he signed up for the National Front in the 1970s. A working-class man but with working-class gumption and intelligence Arthur had built up a successful business. On his retirement he returned to Nationalist politics and became an indispensable part of our BNP activist team.

Arthur was the deputy manager of our BNP bookshop in Welling, South East London. Arthur was part of our team at the Brick Lane Sunday street market. Looking back our energy and commitment was astounding: every Sunday of the year, come rain or come shine, for ten long years, a dedicated, very, group of us sold nationalist papers at the Brick Lane street market, Bethnal Green, East London. Arthur was a regular there.

Arthur was a great guy to know: a shrewd judge of men, quick to sum up a situation, good company, always looking for the positive side things of things, a man of his word, a man you could rely upon.

A number of us were able to attend his funeral service. Arthur Flinders, one of the best.

BNP boosted by UKIP’s disappearance in Pendle

ballot-boxes-460_1418302c

Nominations closed on Tuesday for various local elections being held across most of the UK (except London) on May 4th.

As expected there will be very few candidates from traditional nationalist parties, with most interest focused on just how far UKIP declines. In several (especially northern) counties UKIP have lost about half of their candidates.

For example, we now know that UKIP will have 36 candidates in Lancashire this year, compared to 63 last time; similarly in Cumbria the UKIP candidate list is down from 52 to 23; in North Yorkshire down from 48 to 24; in Durham down from 31 to 14; and in Derbyshire down from 54 to 38.  Further south and east the party has more candidates, though weaker in the South West: down from 48 to 24 in Somerset and from 77 to 21 in Cornwall. The biggest decline is in Wiltshire, where UKIP had 54 candidates last time, but only 8 this year.

One early surprise is in Pendle (part of Lancashire County Council) where the BNP will have two candidates, neither of them opposed by UKIP. Long-serving borough councillor Brian Parker faces Conservative, Labour and Liberal Democrat opponents in the Pendle Central division, while his colleague John Rowe has only Labour and Conservative opponents (both Asian) in Nelson East.

Pendle BNP councillor and county council candidate Brian Parker

Pendle BNP councillor and county council candidate Brian Parker

 

 

British Democratic Party candidate Kevin Stafford

British Democratic Party candidate Kevin Stafford

Kevan Stafford of the British Democrats will contest the Loughborough South division of Leicestershire, his party’s sole candidate.

The National Front will have four candidates across the UK: chairman Kevin Bryan is standing in the Whitworth & Bacup division of Lancashire. Unfortunately (like Mr Stafford of the Brit Dems) he has UKIP opposition.

Dave MacDonald (Mr Bryan’s successor as NF chairman) is contesting the Tillydrone, Seaton & Old Aberdeen ward of Aberdeen City Council.  Mr MacDonald is of course already an elected community councillor in the Aberdeen suburb of Garthdee. Also in Aberdeen, the NF’s Billy Watson is contesting the Torry & Ferryhill ward.

Mr MacDonald’s former deputy Adam Lloyd is NF candidate for Llangewydd & Brynhyfryd ward, Bridgend.

Kevin Bryan of the National Front, standing in his home area of Whitworth & Backup, Lancashire

Kevin Bryan of the National Front, standing in his home area of Whitworth & Backup, Lancashire

Three BNP candidates are standing in Kent: former GLA candidate Cliff Le May in Swanley; Ronald Ball in Dartford NE; and Michael Cope in Dartford West.  Mr Le May is the only one without UKIP opposition: bearing in mind UKIP polled almost 20% in Swanley four years ago, he will be hopeful of a good result in their absence.

There are five BNP candidates in Essex (compared to 14 in 2013 and 75 in 2009): former Braintree parliamentary candidate Paul Hooks in Halstead; Paul Borg and Christine Winter in the two-councillor Pitsea division; Richard Perry in Heybridge & Tollesbury; and Trevor Cable in Maldon. The latter two are standing under the label Fighting Unsustainable Housing Because We Care (which the party has successfully used to win parish council seats in the past without mentioning the BNP name).  We don’t yet know whether this time the name BNP will appear on the ballot paper in these two divisions.

British Resistance (the party founded by supporters of ex-UKIP parliamentary candidate Jack Sen) have two candidates in Worcestershire: former BNP organiser Carl Mason in Nunnery; and Linda Bell in Gorse Hill & Warndon.

Former BNP parliamentary candidate Dr Andrew Emerson is Patria candidate for the Chichester West division of West Sussex. Dr Emerson is also contesting a borough council by-election on the same day in East Wittering ward, Chichester.

Robin Tilbrook - is the ED party over?

Robin Tilbrook – is the ED party over?

Following the imprisonment of former party official Steve Uncles for election fraud, English Democrats candidates are notable by their absence. There are no ED candidates in the former stronghold Doncaster – which has an all-out council and mayoral election this year with no ED presence. So far we only know about party leader Robin Tilbrook, standing in his local Essex division Ongar & Rural, plus ED mayoral candidates Steve Morris in Greater Manchester and Stephen Goldspink in Cambridgeshire and Peterborough. Steve Morris is also contesting a by-election in Besses ward, Bury.

Robert Ashton is BNP candidate for the Louth South division of Lincolnshire, while John Moore is contesting the Hayling Island division of Hampshire.

Former Liverpool BNP organiser Pete Molloy is standing as an independent in the Spennymoor division of Durham (technically a unitary authority rather than a county council). Despite this being the home of party leader Adam Walker, there are no BNP candidates in Durham, nor in Cumbria where the party’s head office is located.

Further news of candidates and campaigns will be posted as we get it. So far H&D believes that the BNP has 12 county council candidates in total, compared to 92 at the last county elections in 2013.

According to H&D‘s (unofficial) calculation, UKIP have 1,037 candidates for the county councils this year: that’s down from 1,494 last time. There are also six unitary authorities that are directly comparable, having elections both in 2013 and this year.  In those six councils combined, UKIP has 85 candidates this year, compared to 242 last time.

There has been a real UKIP collapse in three unitary council areas – Cornwall (from 77 candidates to 21), Wiltshire (from 54 to 8), and Shropshire (from 29 to 9).
By contrast in several South Eastern or Eastern counties UKIP has maintained pretty solid slates: 69 in Kent, 60 in West Sussex, 59 in Essex, 57 in Surrey and 54 in Norfolk.
NOTE: An earlier version of this article incorrectly stated that former Liverpool BNP organiser Pete Molloy was at one time briefly a member of British Voice. We apologise for this error.

BNP leadership tries to mislead members

Another tall tale from Adam Walker, BNP clown and crook.

Another tall tale from Adam Walker, BNP clown and crook.

In a video posted online following the BNP’s recent lost deposit at the Batley & Spen parliamentary by-election, party chairman Adam Walker blatantly tried to mislead members and viewers by pretending that the BNP had taken control of a council in Essex.

Mr Walker was desperately trying to deflect attention from the fact that the BNP vote in Batley & Spen had fallen from more than 7% to 2.7%, despite major parties including the Tories, UKIP and the Liberal Democrats not putting up candidates in this latest by-election.

So he claimed that on the same day the BNP had achieved a great success, gaining control of Heybridge Council.

The truth – as H&D has regularly reported – is that the BNP’s Heybridge organiser Richard Perry also runs a local pressure group campaigning against plans to build additional housing in his area.

It is this group, under the label ‘Fighting Unsustainable Housing – Because We Care’, that has won several parish council seats during the past year, and with two further victories last week, now has a majority on Heybridge Council.

Richard Perry (centre) celebrates with newly elected councillors Ashley Jones and Trevor Cable, who represent the 'Fighting Unsustainable Housing' group - not the BNP.

Richard Perry (centre) celebrates with newly elected councillors Ashley Jones and Trevor Cable, who represent the ‘Fighting Unsustainable Housing’ group – not the BNP.

These victories reflect great credit on Mr Perry, but unlike his party leader he does not pretend that the parish councillors represent the BNP in any way.  Quite the opposite, Mr Perry very honestly told his local newspaper this week that “we are not really pushing the party political issues. …Everyone knows what my political beliefs are but most people just say ‘we don’t care, you’re a good councillor’. We are more interested in fighting the unsustainable housing. It is about local issues not national issues.”

Mr Perry added: “Anyone who wants to join our group is welcome, no matter of their political party, affiliation or religion. …Parish councils are non-political; if I’m standing in a district council election, it is a different matter but we’re not involved on that basis.”

It couldn’t be clearer: Mr Perry’s parish council group campaigns solely on the local housing issue, and if a Muslim Labour Party member or a Jewish Communist wanted to join and become one of their councillors, they would be most welcome. This is not a BNP victory, and Mr Walker should stop his fraudulent pretence.

Massive leak of Soros documents exposes anti-racist agenda

Soros

A network of organisations run by billionaire George Soros (notorious for his profitable speculation against the pound on ‘Black Wednesday’ in 1992) has been successfully targeted in a massive leak of confidential documents, published online today.

One organisation lavishly funded by Soros was the British “antifascist” group Hope Not Hate, which in one of the leaked documents is shown receiving $93,740 for just one of its projects – Hope Camp – in advance of the 2014 elections.

This was part of a series of Soros-funded projects intended to influence those elections.  According to the leaked documents, Hope Camp’s “purpose is to provide a community organizers’ training program for local anti-hate organizations, especially those wanting to engage in the 2014 European elections.  The training model will combine the experience, the organizing and campaigning skills developed and used by HOPE not hate in the UK and by United We Dream in the US.”

The smoking gun: leaked document shows Soros funding for "anti-racist" campaign at 2014 elections - click to view full size

The smoking gun: leaked document shows Soros funding for “anti-racist” campaign at 2014 elections – click to view full size

UK political parties are of course prohibited from receiving overseas donations from people not on the UK electoral register.  It will be interesting to see whether the Electoral Commission takes a close look at foreign, non-party intervention in the electoral process.

Although Soros & Co. might have been well pleased with the BNP’s defeat in 2014, the truth is that this had little to do with “antifascist” campaigning.  Nick Griffin had already effectively destroyed his own party’s chances years earlier.

Moreover, another of the leaked Soros documents – a review of the European campaign, written in November 2014 – showed that not everything went the billionaire’s way.  The document makes clear that the Soros foundations “concentrated a large amount of resources and energy to try and bolster the groups and campaigns which could, in some ways, mitigate the feared populist surge in the EP elections.”

This involved “exposing the weaknesses of the extreme right”.

However, while some projects “far exceeded our expectations”, others “surprised us in a negative way. The grant to UNITED, for example, was a clear disappointment.  While the proposal was well written and the cooperation with ENAR and HOPE not Hate, two OSF grantees which generally deliver great work, seemed promising, not much was achieved on the ground. …Arguing that the HOPE not Hate approach could not be applied in other countries due to particular sensitivities, the project ended up with five very different projects on the ground, with little coordination amongst them. …It was a typical case of a project which looked great on paper, but was an unexpected disappointment in practice.”

H&D looks forward to analysing these leaked documents further: but two points are already evident. Firstly, there was massive financial intervention by George Soros and his foundations in a covert effort to influence European elections.  Secondly, despite lavish funding, many of these interventions failed and are continuing to fail, as European nationalist movements continue to advance!

Peter Mullins RIP

Peter Mullins (1936-2016)

Peter Mullins (1936-2016)

It is with sadness that we learn of the death of Peter Mullins on 28th July 2016.

Peter was a proud ex-serviceman and a charismatic nationalist. Someone who could grab and engage an audience. At our St. George’s Day celebrations his enthusiasm and wit could be relied upon to keep everyone entertained; whether through patriotic speaking, or by organising and acting as quiz master.

Peter’s dedication to nationalism was second to none, working tirelessly and giving his time and money with generosity.

Born in 1936, he was brought up and educated in East Anglia, Luton and Cambridge.

In the late 1950s he joined the Royal Air Force and for many years after he was a member of the Conservative Party.

After leaving the Royal Air Force, Peter worked for many years in North Africa, the Middle East and Pakistan for both Arab and British companies as manager and coordinator for large, heavy electrical and construction projects for foreign governments. During this time he worked and lived in Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates and Iran.

He returned to the U.K. in the early 1980s when he began another career with Ford Motor Company developing Sales and Marketing corporate training and strategies.

In the late 1990s he relocated to Cornwall as the curator of the Daphne du Maurier and Smugglers’ Museums, at the famous “Jamaica Inn” hotel complex at Bolventor, on Bodmin Moor.

At this time that he became completely disenchanted with the political systems in place in our country, ditched the Conservative party and joined the British National Party.

Quickly becoming the BNP Western area organiser, covering from the Solent (Portsmouth/Southampton) to Bristol down to Lands End, he was also a member of the party’s Advisory Council and stood for County Council and for Parliament.

Peter was also a founder of the British Freedom Party and the first chairman. It was well organised and grew quickly, but unfortunately events out of Peter’s hands led to the party’s collapse.

Friends of Peter’s are keen to add their memories.
Brin Jenkins (ex organiser for Cornwall) was a friend of Peter’s for a number of years….

“I held him in high regard. We had similar early backgrounds having both been in the RAF as boys and in similar radio electronic trades. Peter was awarded a commission and became an Electronics officer flying in a number of Cold War aircraft like Nimrods and Vulcans.  I met him when I joined the BNP and he was the Western area organiser. He worked hard and conscientiously in this role seeing the party go from strength to strength. Peter will be missed, a staunch nationalist without compromise. His watch is over: RIP my friend”.

Roger Bennett, another close friend….

“Peter was a passionate nationalist who put himself forward in parliamentary elections many times.  Being a clone of Enoch Powell, the most memorable was 2009.

Peter stood in Enoch Powell’s old constituency in Wolverhampton, West Midlands. A poster showing a picture of Peter with only these words at the top.  HE’S BACK and at the bottom VOTE  BNP.  This was very effective with Peter securing a high vote for the party.

Peter was a very good speaker,  he spoke with passion and superb diction and always with wit and humour. I had him as an after dinner speaker who could always be relied on to be informative and very funny with it.

One time on Euston station, he spotted Peter Ustinov.  Peter approached him and asked are you Peter Ustinov?  Do I owe you money? Was the reply.  NO said Peter.
Well in that case I am he.  They had a long conversation both amusing each other.

Away from politics he was a talented golfer who loved the game and played up to the time of his death. One didn’t play Peter for money if your wallet was light. He was very well known in the golfing world and many people will also miss him greatly.

I have lost friend whom I shall miss”.

Peter read the famous “Rivers of Blood” speech delivered by Powell back in 1968 in the very same Birmingham hotel where Powell had addressed his Conservative Party conference.

The entire speech can be heard on

http://www.radioaryan.com/

I had known Peter long enough to know he was a committed, honest and true Englishman and he will be sadly missed not just by those who knew him and the nationalist movement, but by those Britons yet to recognise their own, ever growing, funeral pyre.

Peter Mullins RIP.

John Ings

My thanks also to Adrian Romilly and Dave Perkins for their contributions.

Editor’s note: Sadly we have also recently heard of the deaths of two staunch nationalists and H&D subscribers from Worcestershire: Michael Carr, from Kidderminster, aged 70; and Tom Hickman, from Stourbridge, aged 83.

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