Chairman Rat Leaves Sinking Ship

Adam Walker (right) has left the sinking BNP ship, four years after ousting Nick Griffin.

H&D understands that Adam Walker – who has been chairman of the virtually defunct British National Party since 2014 – left his post two days ago. It’s not yet clear whether Walker jumped or was pushed by his former cronies Clive Jefferson and Patrick Harrington. Former London mayoral candidate David Furness is said to have taken temporary charge.

The BNP has long since ceased to be a viable political organisation, and continues to exist solely with the aim of collecting legacies from misguided elderly patriots.

It could all have been so different, but one good thing to come out of the latest shameful episode might be that this once great party is finally put out of its misery, clearing the way for numerous fine nationalists still within its ranks to ditch their illusions and move on.

 

October 10th update:
Patrick Harrington informs us: “I have not had any contact with either Mr Jefferson or Mr Walker for over two years when a company I manage ceased to provide professional advice.”

Curiouser and curiouser.

 

Anthony David Jones RIP

The H&D team was very sorry to learn of the death of Dave Jones, an outstanding racial nationalist and loyalist who made a great contribution to our cause since the 1970s. As some readers will know, Dave had been in poor health for some years.

Dave Jones, racial nationalist, loyalist and parliamentary candidate, died on Friday 14th September

During the 1970s and 1980s Dave was a Manchester officer of the Ulster Defence Association (UDA), carrying out intelligence work against the terrorist alliance between militant ‘antifascists’ and the IRA, INLA and republican splinter groups. At the same time he was also a National Front activist, remaining loyal to the NF through the difficult years of the late ’70s and early ’80s.

In 1978 he was an NF council candidate for the first time, gaining 136 votes (3.2%) in the Ashton West & Limehurst ward of Tameside Metropolitan Borough, east of Manchester. At the following year’s General Election he was NF parliamentary candidate for Ashton-under-Lyne.

After the multiple NF splits of the mid-1980s Dave found a new political home in the Conservative Party, for whom he twice contested Tameside council elections in the increasingly multiracial Ashton St Peter’s ward, polling 20.1% in 1988 and 15.1% in 1990.

Dave then emigrated to South Africa, where he spent much of the 1990s pursuing his studies. Dave was a mine of information on political and military history and a tenacious researcher. In the age of Google and ‘fake news’ it’s often difficult to rely on information supplied even by fellow nationalists, but with Dave Jones you always knew you could rely on the accuracy and acuity of his observations.

Dave and Bev Jones with members of what was then a very successful Tameside branch of the BNP

While in South Africa, Dave met and married his wife Bev, a fellow racial nationalist activist, and when they returned to England at the turn of the millennium our cause was once again in the ascendant, especially in Oldham – the town adjacent to Dave’s native Ashton.

Dave and Bev began attending Oldham BNP branch meetings, where H&D assistant editor Peter Rushton was at the time a regular speaker. Peter arranged with Nick Griffin for Dave and Bev to revive a Tameside branch of the party. Ironically Tameside BNP was to remain succesful for several years under Dave and Bev’s leadership, even after Oldham BNP had collapsed following Griffin’s treacherous conduct.

From 2004 to 2010 Dave contested five council elections for the BNP, with his best result coming in 2006: 755 votes (24.5%) in his home ward of Ashton Waterloo.

He also saved his deposit as a parliamentary candidate at successive general elections with 2,051 votes (5.5%) in Ashton-under-Lyne in 2005, and 2,259 votes (5.5%) in Stalybridge & Hyde in 2010.

Sadly this was to be Dave’s electoral swansong. The BNP collapsed soon after that 2010 election. Although already in very poor health, Dave bravely attended meetings organised by Andrew Brons and others in an effort to salvage something from the wreckage of the party Griffin had destroyed. Shortly before his death, Dave arranged with two longstanding comrades in the North West (who had by now left the BNP for the NF) to inherit his library – so his great store of knowledge about our movement, race and nation will be preserved for the next generation of activists.

Rest in Peace, Dave: Quis Separabit.

RIP: Ken Booth and Stephen Mitford Goodson

The H&D team was very sad to learn of the deaths of two old friends and comrades in recent weeks.

Ken Booth of Newcastle, leading organiser for NF, BNP and British Democrats

Ken Booth, for years one of the most active nationalists in North East England, died from cancer on 17th July aged 65. Ken served in senior positions with the National Front, British National Party and British Democratic Party. Ken leaves eleven children, the youngest aged 7. His talents in leaflet design and branch organisation made racial nationalism the main challenger to Labour hegemony in many parts of the North East, and it is tragic to reflect on how much more he could have achieved had our movement not been blighted by factional division since the millennium.

Stephen Mitford Goodson addressing H&D‘s 2013 John Tyndall Memorial Meeting in Preston.

Stephen Mitford Goodson, a frequent H&D contributor and a former director of the South African Reserve Bank, died on 4th August aged 70. While we knew that Ken Booth had been seriously ill, Stephen’s death came as a shock: his last contribution to our magazine will appear in the November issue. Stephen Mitford Goodson was a relentless and well-informed critic of the global financial elite and a contributing editor of The Barnes Review. His work serialised in H&D included biographies of two very different South African leaders, Gen. Jan Christian Smuts and Dr Hendrik Frensch Verwoerd.

RIP Ken and Stephen: we shall remember your courage and commitment as we continue the struggle.

New archive for British ‘alt-right’ heritage

A newly launched online archive ‘Roots of Radicalism’ contains vital resources on the ideological heritage of our movement.

This website will be regularly updated and extended: it presently contains thirty articles from the British nationalist magazine Vanguard, first published during 1986/1987.

The site’s founders write:

The term ‘alt-right’ has become widely used in recent years. It does not describe a single, monolithic ideology, but rather a spectrum of related ideas and values. However, it can be said that the alt-right generally:

  • Recognises the positive values of group identities, nationalities and ethnicities;
  • Is prepared to unflinchingly challenge the dominant values of the liberal consensus, including the obsessive egalitarianism of the left;
  • Is not materialistic, and does not think that economic growth is the solution to every problem;
  • Does not believe itself to be on the same side as global capitalism – this, more than anything else, distinguishes the ‘alternative right’ from the conventional right.

Mainstream media commentators, blinkered by years of liberal orthodoxy, have tended to regard the alt-right as a disturbing, new phenomenon. We hope they are right to be disturbed, but they are wrong if they think that the ‘alt-right’ is new: its roots go back a long way, long before the term ‘alt-right’ had ever been thought of.

This website looks at the British contribution to this dissident political heritage, and – when finished – will include hundreds of articles from a wide variety of sources, from independent thinkers to those supporting nationalistic political parties.

As you will see these articles do not represent a single ‘party line’. The writers used a variety of different terms to describe themselves: not ‘alt-right’ but radical right or new right. Indeed many would have rejected the term ‘right-wing’ altogether, believing that they were trying to create an alternative to the existing, conventional Left-Right dichotomy and not wanting to be confused with the capitalist right. Such people generally used terms like ‘radical nationalist’ or ‘ethnic nationalist’ to describe themselves. Needless to say, the political Left used rather different terms, of varying degrees of ranting hysteria…

We believe, however, that the content of their writings are more significant than the labels attached to them. What these writers have in common is that they cared about Britain and the British people and tried to show that there is an alternative to the conventional ‘-isms’ of capitalism, liberalism, socialism or communism.

We hope you find this website to be a useful resource. It is our intention to add about thirty articles a month to the site, so please bookmark us, and visit us again from time to time. If there are worthy publications, authors and articles you feel we have overlooked please contact us and let us know – we make no claims to omniscience!

The archive is online now at www.rootsofradicalism.com

Nationalist candidates at 2018 local elections

Tess Culnane, BNP candidate for Downham ward, Lewisham

Regular H&D readers will not be surprised to see only a small number of nationalist candidates at this year’s local elections, even though the London borough councils were up for election, which usually means a big increase in candidates from a normal year. We are in a transitional period, with UKIP in terminal decline, but its remnants still blocking the way for the re-emergence of a large scale nationalist effort.

The big story was the retirement of long serving BNP councillor Brian Parker, who stood down in Marsden ward, Pendle. There was no new BNP candidate to replace Mr Parker, so the party gave up its last borough council seat. All bar one of the remaining BNP candidates this year were in London, and almost all finished bottom of the poll, the main exceptions being brothers John and Dave Clarke who achieved credible results in Croydon, and Tess Culnane in Downham ward, Lewisham, who defeated a full slate from the ex-UKIP party Democrats & Veterans.

The highest BNP vote was for Michael Jones in East Wickham ward, Bexley, who had no UKIP or similar opponent, and the best nationalist vote overall was for ex-BNP organiser Steven Smith in Brunshaw ward, Burnley, who similarly had no UKIP or post-UKIP opposition.  Arguably the best performance however was by Dr Jim Lewthwaite in Wyke ward, Bradford, who doubled his vote and finished ahead of both UKIP and the breakaway ex-UKIP party Democrats & Veterans.

The list below shows the result for every nationalist candidate that we know of, and will be updated if further information arrives.

see also report and analysis here

BNP: 16 candidates

London Borough of Barking & Dagenham
Eastbrook – Tony McKay – 158 votes (5,2%, -1.2) – 8th of 8
Goresbrook – Bede Smith – 246 votes (10.8%, -3.1) – 7th of 7

London Borough of Bexley
East Wickham – Michael Jones – 398 votes (9.5%, -0.7) – 7th of 7
Erith – Pamela Mackie – 154 votes (6.5%, -2.5) – 5th of 5
Falconwood & Welling – Jaymie McCoy – 101 votes (1.9%, -7.0) – 12th of 12
Northumberland Heath – Robert Howard – 160 votes (5.1%, -7.0) – 6th of 6
Sidcup – John Brooks – 130 votes (2.6%, -1.5), 12th of 13

London Borough of Croydon
New Addington N – John Clarke – 142 votes (7.1%) – 5th of 8
New Addington S – Dave Clarke – 131 votes (4.8%) – 6th of 8
Selsdon & Addington Village – Michael Collard – 42 votes (1.1%) – 9th of 9

London Borough of Ealing
Northolt West End – David Furness – 180 votes (4.5%, -3.7) – 10th of 13

Royal Borough of Greenwich
Coldharbour & New Eltham – Cliff Adams – 123 votes (2.8%, -5.3) – 12th of 12

London Borough of Havering
Saint Andrew’s – Denise Underwood – 123 votes (2.5%) – 12th of 13

London Borough of Hillingdon
West Drayton – Vincent Evans – 143 votes (3.6%) – 7th of 9

London Borough of Lewisham
Downham – Tess Culnane – 98 votes (2.9%) – 12th of 15

Exeter City Council
St Thomas – Chris Stone – 34 votes (1.2%, -0.2) – 5th of 5

 

National Front: 5 candidates

London Borough of Havering
Gooshays – Kevin Layzell – 50 votes (1.4%) – 18th of 18

London Borough of Sutton
St Helier – Richard Edmonds – 49 votes (1.7%) – 13th of 13

Calderdale Metropolitan Borough
Todmorden – Chris Jackson – 98 votes (2.7%) – 5th of 5

Rossendale Borough Council
Irwell – Kevin Bryan – 56 votes (4.6%) – 3rd of 3

Amber Valley Borough Council
Langley Mill & Aldercar – Tim Knowles – 30 votes (2.7%) – 4th of 4

 

British Democratic Party: 1 candidate

Bradford City Council
Wyke – Dr Jim Lewthwaite – 161 votes (5.5%, +2.7) – 3rd of 7

 

British Resistance: 1 candidate

Worcester City Council
Nunnery – Carl Mason – 17 votes (0.8%, +0.4) – 5th of 5

 

Independent nationalist candidates

Burnley Borough Council
Brunshaw – Steven Smith – 171 votes (14.8%) – 3rd of 4

Liverpool City Council
Kensington & Fairfield – Joe Owens – 114 votes (4.9%) – 3rd of 6

Manchester City Council
Crumpsall – John Rowe – 138 votes (3.4%) – 10th of 11

 

English Democrats: 4 candidates
(we include the EDs in this list because in recent years the party absorbed some former BNP members and therefore included some people who would be regarded by H&D readers as part of our movement; we should however make it clear that none of the candidates below are former BNP members)

Sheffield City Region Mayoralty
David Allen – 14,547 votes (5.6%) – 6th of 7

Barnsley Metropolitan Borough
Rockingham – Kevin Riddiough – 235 votes (11.1%, +8.7) – 3rd of 4

Bury Metropolitan Borough
Besses – Steve Morris – 169 votes (7.1%, -9.4) – 3rd of 5

Salford City Council
Swinton South – Craig Holmes – 163 votes (7.4%) – 3rd of 6

 

BNP gives up its last council seat without a fight

Pendle BNP councillor Brian Parker is stepping down this year, and the party is not putting up a candidate in his Marsden ward – the last BNP council seat in the country

Today the BNP surrendered its last council seat without a fight.  Just a few years ago the party was hitting the headlines with council victories in many areas of England, and even two Members of the European Parliament.  Yet today the press didn’t even notice when the last BNP council seat – Marsden ward, Pendle – was given up.

Nominations closed this afternoon for the local council elections, and it can now be confirmed that long-serving Cllr Brian Parker will not be defending his seat.  No one can blame Cllr Parker for retiring: he has put in a big effort sustained over twelve years, first gaining the seat from Labour in 2006, then winning re-election in 2010 and 2014.  He also contested the Pendle Central division four times at Lancashire County Council elections, most recently last year, and was parliamentary candidate for Pendle at last year’s general election.

The truth is that the BNP has collapsed around Mr Parker and a handful of other nationalist true-believers, and its national leadership is now devoted to hunting financial legacies rather than genuine political activity. The six surviving BNP candidates so far declared (all but one in London) are: David Furness in Northolt West End ward, Ealing; Vincent Evans in West Drayton ward, Hillingdon; Denise Underwood in Saint Andrews ward, Havering; Bede Smith in Goresbrook ward, Barking & Dagenham; Tony McKay in Eastbrook ward, Barking & Dagenham; and Chris Stone in St Thomas ward, Exeter.

Elsewhere veteran nationalist Richard Edmonds will be National Front candidate for St Helier ward, Sutton, unfortunately facing a full slate of three UKIP opponents, as is Kevin Layzell in Gooshays ward, Havering.  NF chairman Kevin Bryan is more lucky, facing no UKIP opposition in Irwell ward, Rossendale where he is in a three-way fight against Lab and Con. Similarly Chris Jackson as NF candidate for Todmorden ward, Calderdale, has no UKIP opponent.

NF chairman Kevin Bryan is contesting his home ward of Irwell, Rossendale

Dr Jim Lewthwaite, chairman of the British Democratic Party, will be British Democrats candidate for Wyke ward, Bradford – the sole nationalist candidate in a city which once had four BNP councillors.

Former BNP, NF and EFP candidate Steven Smith (architect of the BNP’s success in Burnley sixteen years ago) is standing as Independent candidate for Brunshaw ward, Burnley, where he has no UKIP opposition.

Controversial nationalist author Joe Owens is Independent candidate for Kensington & Fairfield ward, Liverpool.

The almost extinct English Democrats have a candidate in Salford, yet another city where a once strong BNP branch has completely disappeared.  Probably the most high profile ED campaign will be for the new Sheffield City Region mayoralty, where David Allen is ED candidate.  This new region includes Doncaster, where the EDs won the old mayoralty in 2009. Another longstanding ED Kevin Riddiough will again be contesting Rockingham ward, Barnsley, and similarly Steve Morris will again contest Besses ward, Bury.

In most of the country the breaking news is of UKIP decline and in many cases disappearance, most notably in their former stronghold of Thurrock, where the entire UKIP group of councillors (including MEP Tim Aker) has left the party.  These councillors will be standing for re-election as ‘Thurrock Independents’, while the official UKIP has mustered only five candidates across the borough.

There are no UKIP candidates in Oldham, where the party is failing to defend the two seats gained in 2014.  Former UKIP councillor Warren Bates is standing for re-election as an Independent in the Failsworth West ward. Another old BNP stronghold where UKIP has now completely disappeared is Barking & Dagenham.  It is rare this year to find a council with a full UKIP slate of candidates for every ward: two examples are Derby and Swindon. In the whole of Birmingham there is only one UKIP candidate, though at least one ex-UKIP parliamentary candidate is standing as an independent.  Former UKIP leadership has candidate John Rees-Evans now runs a ‘Democrats and Veterans’ party which has candidates for several councils this year, including several in Yorkshire: Bradford, Leeds, Barnsley, Harrogate, Wakefield, Kirklees, and Hull.

So far it looks as though Mr Rees-Evans’s party will have substantially more candidates than another newly registered party led by another former UKIP leadership candidate. The ‘For Britain Movement’ created by Anne-Marie Waters on an anti-Islam platform is contesting the Washington North ward in Sunderland, another area where the UKIP branch seems to have collapsed. The strongest For Britain branch appears to be in Leeds, where they are contesting six city council wards. This should give them a chance of some decent results, because following boundary changes the entire Leeds council is being elected this year, with voters in each ward having three votes. Usually this gives a big boost to small parties (as with Burnley BNP in 2002).

There are seven UKIP candidates in Leeds, and only one ward (Crossgates & Whinmoor) has both UKIP and For Britain.  Another of the few areas where For Britain is making progress is the Black Country borough of Sandwell, where there are three For Britain candidates and only one UKIP (the latter has For Britain opposition in Charlemont with Grove Vale ward).

A For Britain candidate is also standing in Yateley East ward, Hart.  On the opposite side of the European debate, another new party seems to be having the same marginal impact as Ms Waters.  The self-styled ‘centrist’ and pro-Remain party Renew, founded by former anti-terrorist officer Chris Coghlan, has twelve candidates so far: eight in its main London base of Wandsworth; two in North Tyneside; and one each in Ealing and Hounslow.

H&D will report further on the 2018 local council elections as nominations are announced.

p.s.: Any nationalists feeling a bit depressed by the state of our movement should spare a thought for the lavishly funded ‘anti-fascists’ of Hope not Hate, whose ‘expert’ election article today predicts that Anne-Marie Waters and For Britain will have Rotherham as one of their target areas in this year’s election.  In fact there are no council elections in Rotherham this year (not until 2020). We do hope none of that Soros money has been spent on special anti-fascist leaflets for Rotherham…

Griffin’s pantomime comeback

Nick Griffin is best remembered for his roles in Carry on Cleo (“Infamy, infamy, they’ve all got it in for me!”) and Sunset Boulevard (“I’m still big, it’s the politics that got small”).

This year Griffin follows in the footsteps of other show business hasbeens such as Mickey Rooney, trying to eke out his EU pension with a turn in that most British of theatrical traditions – pantomime.

Backed by canny impresario Jim Dowson, Griffin hopes that his tired routine of gags about queers, communists and spies – some not heard since his 1988 hit Attempted Murder – will have a gullible public queueing at the box office to hand over their hard earned shekels.

Griffin’s attempted comeback has been insightfully reviewed by veteran nationalist Eddy Morrison at Nationalist Sentinel, and by Jez Turner of the London Forum at Radio Aryan.

But we must warn readers. Beware the traditional panto cry to look “behind you”!  In Mr Griffin’s case there’s a very real chance he might have a knife (or worse) in his hand: you have been warned – watch your backs!

BNP and other nationalist votes

Pendle BNP councillor and county council candidate Brian Parker

Pendle BNP councillor and parliamentary candidate Brian Parker

An extraordinary General Election that wiped out Theresa May’s Conservative majority also saw the electoral eclipse of the BNP and the English Democrats, none of whose candidates even came close to saving their deposits.

Brian Parker – the BNP’s sole remaining borough councillor – polled only 718 votes (1.6%) in Pendle, his party’s main target seat.

BNP chairman Adam Walker managed a slightly better result in Bishop Auckland, but was bottom of the poll with 991 votes (2.3%).

Meanwhile the English Democrats’ results were even worse, collapsing from an already low base. As the SNP lost support north of the border it appears that the Union is safe, and logically ‘English’ nationalism has lost relevance.[spacer height=”20px”]

BNP results

Bexleyheath & Crayford
Peter Finch 0.6%

Bishop Auckland
Adam Walker 2.3%

Charnwood
Stephen Denham 0.6% (-0.4)

Dagenham & Rainham
Paul Sturdy 0.5% (+0.2)

Eltham
John Clarke 1.6%

Hornchurch & Upminster
David Furness 0.7% (+0.3)

Maldon [listed as ‘Fighting Unsustainable Housing’: BNP name not on ballot]
Richard Perry 0.5%

Old Bexley & Sidcup
Michael Jones 0.7% (+0.2)

Pendle
Brian Parker 1.6%

South Basildon & East Thurrock
Paul Borg 0.8%

——–

English Democrat candidates

Barnsley Central
Stephen Morris 0.5% (-0.8)

Barnsley East
Kevin Riddiough 0.7% (-0.4)

Bradford South
Thérèse Hirst 0.9%

Clacton
Robin Tilbrook 0.7%

Doncaster North
David Allen 0.9% (-0.3)

Holborn & St Pancras
Janus Polenceus 0.2%

NE Cambridgeshire
Stephen Goldspink 0.5%

[spacer height=”20px”]

Paul Nuttall (left) has succeeded Nigel Farage as UKIP leader following a period of internal turmoil. He claims that UKIP will serious challenge Labour in Northern England.

Paul Nuttall (left) succeeded Nigel Farage last year as UKIP leader following a period of internal turmoil. He resigned today after electoral humiliation,

Meanwhile those racial nationalists who believed that UKIP offered us some hope must think again after the party suffered a series of crushing defeats, ending with the resignation of humiliated leader Paul Nuttall.

Notable UKIP disasters included Clacton (formerly their sole parliamentary seat until Douglas Carswell’s resignation) where UKIP’s vote fell from 44.4% to 7.6%; Thanet South (where re-elected Conservative MP Craig Mackinlay still faces criminal charges for fraudulent overspending during his defeat of Nigel Farage in 2015) – UKIP vote down from 32.4% to 6.0%; and Boston & Skegness, a key target seat contested by Nuttall himself – UKIP vote down from 33.8% to 7.7%.

The only vaguely credible UKIP result came in Thurrock, where UKIP’s Tim Aker (an MEP from a part-Turkish background) fought a vigorous campaign against pro-Remain Tory MP Jackie Doyle-Price.  However even here the UKIP vote fell from 31.7% to 20.1%. Ms Doyle-Price survived, and Labour pushed UKIP into third place.

 

Nationalist candidates in this year’s elections

ballot box

 

Polls have closed in local elections held today across many parts of the country – with the notable exception of Greater London.  These elections will be seen as a dress rehearsal for next month’s general election, but are likely to be distorted by very low turnouts.

The big losers this week are likely to be UKIP and Labour, with gains for the SNP, Conservatives and Liberal Democrats. Click here for updated results and analysis of the bigger election picture.

There are also a small number of candidates from nationalist parties, as explained in our article on election nominations last month.

 

BNP – 12 candidates

Essex
Halstead – Paul Hooks  0.5%
Heybridge & Tollesbury – Richard Perry  8.2%
Maldon – Trevor Cable  2.4%
Pitsea (2 vacancies) – Paul Borg and Christine Winter  2.1%

Kent
Dartford NE – Ronald Ball 1.6%
Dartford W – Michael Cope  0.9%
Swanley – Cliff Le May 2.5%

Hampshire
Hayling Island – John Moore  0.6%

Lancashire
Nelson E – John Rowe  10.8%
Pendle C – Brian Parker  20.4%

Lincolnshire
Louth S – Robert Ashton  1.5%


National Front – 4 candidates

Aberdeen
Tillydrone, Seaton & Old Aberdeen – Dave MacDonald 1.2%
Torry & Ferryhill – Billy Watson 0.2%

Bridgend
Llangewydd & Brynhyfryd – Adam Lloyd 3.0%

Lancashire
Whitworth & Bacup – Kevin Bryan 1.6%


English Democrats – 4 candidates (we include the EDs in this list because in recent years the party absorbed some former BNP members and therefore included some people who would be regarded by H&D readers as part of our movement; we should however make it clear that none of the candidates below are former BNP members)

Bury
Besses (by-election) – Steve Morris  6.9%

Cambridgeshire & Peterborough
Mayoral election – Stephen Goldspink  1.1%

Essex
Ongar & Rural – Robin Tilbrook  1.7%

Greater Manchester
Mayoral election – Steve Morris  2.0%


British Resistance – 2 candidates

Worcestershire
Gorse Hill & Warndon – Linda Bell 2.0%
Nunnery – Carl Mason 0.5%


British Democratic Party

Leicestershire
Loughborough S – Kevan Stafford  1.1%


Patria

West Sussex
Chichester W – Dr Andrew Emerson  0.5%
(also contesting a simultaneous borough by-election in East Wittering, Chichester1.4%


Independent

Durham
Spennymoor – Pete Molloy  14.8%

Leicestershire
Coalville N – Graham Partner  2.3%

 

Arthur Flinders: British Nationalist (1939-2017)

Obituary by Richard Edmonds

Quoting a verse from an old, pre-Christian Norse saga:

Cattle die, and kinsmen die,
And so one dies oneself;
One thing I know that never dies:
The fame of a dead man’s deeds.

Arthur Flinders with Jean-Marie Le Pen at the FN's Bleu-Blanc-Rouge festival in 1999

Arthur Flinders with Jean-Marie Le Pen at the FN’s Bleu-Blanc-Rouge festival in 1999

Our friend and comrade, a staunch British nationalist, a man who shared many of our adventures and was right in the thick of them, Arthur Flinders, has died.

Arthur Flinders, born in South London during the Second World War, had led an adventurous life long before he signed up for the National Front in the 1970s. A working-class man but with working-class gumption and intelligence Arthur had built up a successful business. On his retirement he returned to Nationalist politics and became an indispensable part of our BNP activist team.

Arthur was the deputy manager of our BNP bookshop in Welling, South East London. Arthur was part of our team at the Brick Lane Sunday street market. Looking back our energy and commitment was astounding: every Sunday of the year, come rain or come shine, for ten long years, a dedicated, very, group of us sold nationalist papers at the Brick Lane street market, Bethnal Green, East London. Arthur was a regular there.

Arthur was a great guy to know: a shrewd judge of men, quick to sum up a situation, good company, always looking for the positive side things of things, a man of his word, a man you could rely upon.

A number of us were able to attend his funeral service. Arthur Flinders, one of the best.

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