Actor launches new party to fight ‘culture wars’

Laurence Fox on BBC Question Time in January this year

Actor Laurence Fox – probably best known for his role as DS Hathaway in the long-running British television series Lewishas announced plans for a new political party to take on ‘woke’ culture warriors who dominate the UK news agenda.

Fox’s political views first came to public attention earlier this year when he was a panellist on the BBC’s Question Time. During a discussion about alleged ‘racism’ experienced by the Duchess of Sussex (former actress Meghan Markle), Fox commented: “It’s not racism … we’re the most tolerant, lovely country in Europe. It’s so easy to throw the charge of racism and it’s really starting to get boring now.”

He is the son of actor James Fox and nephew of fellow actor Edward Fox.

The party is to be called Reclaim, and among its stated objectives is “to promote an open space through full protection of the fundamental freedoms of speech, expression, thought, association and academic inquiry. To stand in full opposition to laws and other measures which undermine those freedoms.”

Another objective is “to preserve and celebrate our shared national history, cultural inheritance and global contribution.”

According to the Daily Telegraph, donors to the new party – which has been planned for the past two months – include former Conservative Party, Brexit Party and Vote Leave donor Jeremy Hosking.

There is no news yet from the Electoral Commission as to this new party being officially accepted and registered – which would be required before it could stand candidates in elections.

Mark Collett and Laura Towler of Patriotic Alternative – which like Laurence Fox’s ‘Reclaim’ has yet to be accepted by the Electoral Commission as a registered political party

Similarly the new racial nationalist party Patriotic Alternative has yet to be registered by the Commission, who rejected an earlier application by PA on a technicality.

As reported in H&D Issue 98, two former UKIP leadership candidates had their efforts to launch new parties rejected in June this year. Mike Hookem’s Alliance for Democracy and Freedom was eventually accepted on August 18th after reapplying, but the Heritage Party set up by the half-Jamaican David Kurten was rejected again by the Commission on September 4th.

Mr Kurten might not have a party (yet), but thanks to the postponement of last May’s elections he remains a Member of the Greater London Assembly (to which he was originally elected as a UKIP candidate) until May 2021 – or possibly later still, if the Covid pandemic forces another delay.

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